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Full text of "Town Report"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
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http://archive.org/details/townreport19561959linc 



rOWN OF LINCOLN 
MASSACHUSETTS 



.^sofoho 




1956- report 



Jveport 



of the Officers and Committees 



of the 



^Csown of lolncoln 



FOR THE YEAR 1956 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN — Second and fourth Mondays of each month, 8 P. M. at 
the Town House, Clearwater 9-8850. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE — First Tuesday of each month, 8 P. M. at the 
Charles Sumner Smith School, CI. 9-8172. 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS — First Wednesday of each month, 8 P. M. at 
the Town House, Clearwater 9-8850. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS — Meetings by appointment; call Sumner Smith, 
Clearwater 9-8213. 

BOARD OF HEALTH — Meetings by appointment; call Dr. Gordon 
Donaldson, Clearwater 9-8192. 

BOARD OF APPEALS — Meetings by appointment; call Town House, 
Clearwater 9-8850. 

PLANNING BOARD — Second Wednesday of each month, 8 P. M. at the 
Town House, Clearwater 9-8850. 

Population — 2,949 by 1955 census. 

Town Area — 8,572 acres. 

1956 Tax Rate — $58.00 per $1,000 valuation. 

Annual Town Meeting — First Monday in March after the fifteenth - 
March 18, 1957. 

Annual Election of Town Officers — Saturday following Town Meeting - 
March 23, 1957. 

Qualifications for Registration — Twelve months continuous residence 
in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts prior to March 18, 
1957, and six months continuous residence in the Town 
of Lincoln prior to March 18, 1957. 

Town Office — Open daily 8:30 A. M. to 5:00 P. M. Closed on 
Saturdays. 

Town Dump — Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays - 10:30 A.M. 
to 5 P. M. 



CONTENTS 



TOWN CALENDAR 

TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Officers and Committees ..... 1 

Honorary Selectmen 9 

Board of Selectmen 10 

Town Clerk 17 

Licenses 48 

FINANCE 

Auditors 49 

Treasurer 51 

Collector of Taxes 66 

Assessors 67 

Trust Fund Commissioners 175 

Finance Committee Recommendations 184 

PROTECTION 

Police Department 69 

Fire Department 71 

Inspector of Animals 72 

Tree Warden 73 

Civil Defense Agency 75 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 76 

Nursing Committee 78 

Public Assistance Agent 80 

Mosquito Control 81 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 83 

Board of Appeals 86 

Water Commissioners 89 

Inspectors 90 

Highway Department 91 

Cemetery Commissioners 92 

Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee 93 

Public Land Study Committee 94 

School Building Committee 98 

Police -Jire Station Plans Committee 100 

Veterans 1 Memorial Committee 101 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Bemis Free Lectures 102 

Library Trustees 103 

Middlesex County Extension Service « . . . . 107 

Recreation Committee 109 

DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park 110 

Lincoln Scholarship Fund 115 

School Committee 116 

Regional School Committee 133 

APPENDIX 

Vital Statistics IAS 

Valuation List 153 

Trust Funds 176 

WARRANT FOR 1957 192 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



EIECTED TOWN OFFICERS 



MODERATOR Term Expires 

Donald P. Donaldson " 1957 

TOWN CUSRK 

William H. Davis 1957 

SELECTMEN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Charles K. Fitts, Chairman 1959 

William T. King 1958 

Elliott V. Grabill 1957 

ASSESSORS 

Frederick H. Greene, Jr., Chairman 1958 

Arthur W. Rice, Jr 1957 

Elmer H. Ziegler 1959 

TREASURER 

Frederick B. Taylor 1957 

COLIECTOR OF TAXES 

William H. Davis 1959 

AUDITOR 

Louis C. Farley, Jr 1957 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

John W. Carman, Chairman 1959 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 1957 

Ernest P. Neumann 1958 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Sumner Smith, Chairman 1959 

Henry Warner 1958 

Ed\«rd S. Taylor 1957 

TREE WARDEN 

Robert Ralston 1957 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Gordon A. Donaldson, Chairman 1958 

Ellen DeN. Cannon 1957 

Walter L. Hill 1959 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Term Expires 

Victor A. Lutnicki, Chairman 1958 

William A. Wilson 1957 

John W. Carman 1959 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

George E. Cunningham, Chairman 1959 

Robert D. Donaldson 1957 

H. Arnold MacLean 1958 

PLANNING BOARD 

Everett A. Black, Chairman 1958 

Alan McClennen, Clerk 1959 

Arthur T. Howard 1957 

Katharine S. White I960 

Walter F. Bogner 1961 

MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK 

Albert Brooks 1957 

C. Lee Todd 1957 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Clement C. Sawtell, Chairman 1958 

William T. King 1957 

Richard F. Schroeder 1959 

TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND FOR FREE PUBLIC I£CTURES 

Christopher W. Hurd, Chairman . 1958 

Mabel H. Todd 1959 

Leonard C. Larrabee (Resigned) 1957 

Paul Brooks (Appointed) 1957 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

Roland C. MacKenzie, Chairman 

George G. Tarbell 

Alice G. Meriam 

Charles K. Fitts, Chairman, Board of Selectmen, ex officio 
John W. Carman, Chairman, School Committee, ex officio 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

A. Directors 

John Q. Adams I960 

Charles H. Blake 1957 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 1958 

Polly F. Brown 1959 

B. Directors 

Arthur E. Thiessen - appointed by Selectmen 1957 

Stanley Heck - appointed by Library Trustees 1958 

William N. Swift - appointed by School Committee .... 1959 

2 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BI THE BOARD OF SEI£CTMEN 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY Term Expires 

M. Elizabeth Causer 1957 

PUBLIC WELFARE AGENT 
M. Elizabeth Causer 1957 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 
Raymond P. Maher 1957 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Leo J. Algeo 1957 

POLICE OFFICERS 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1957 

James J. Diamond 1957 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 1957 

CONSTABI£S 

Leo J. Algeo 1957 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1957 

James J. Diamond 1957 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 1957 

George E. Cunningham 1957 

DOG OFFICERS 

Leo J. Algeo 1957 

Iawrence P. Hallett 1957 

James J. Diamond 1957 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 1957 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Orrin C. Wood 1957 





SPECIAL POLICE 


John T. Algeo 


Harry B. Knowles, Jr. 


Robert H. Booth 


Harry B. Knowles, 3rd 


Floriy Campobasso 


Karl F. Lahnstein 


Joseph Campobasso 


Edward D. Rooney 


John Cook 


Carl Smith 


Joseph Cotoni 


Francis J. Smith 


Henry J. Davis 


Sumner Smith 


James DeNormandie 


David Spooner 


William Doherty 


Alanson H. Sturgis, J: 


Andrew J. Dougherty 


Henry Warner 


Francis T. Gilbert 


Orrin C. Wood 


John Gilbert 


Ernest L. Johnson 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

FIRE ENGINEERS Term Expires 

Andrew J. Dougherty 1957 

Frank W. Gordon 1957 

William M. Dean 1957 

FOREST WARDEN 

Andrew J. Dougherty 1957 

DEPUTY FOREST WARDEN 

Frank W. Gordon 1957 

MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 

Robert Ralston 1957 

PETROLEUM INSPECTOR 

Andrew J. Dougherty 1957 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL IEFENSE 

Eveleth R. Todd 1957 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Walter Bergquist 1957 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Daniel J. Murphy 1957 

WIRING INSPECTOR 

William M. Dean 1957 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

John W. White, Chairman 1957 

Henry B. Hoover 1958 

Thomas B. Adams 1959 

Hans Van Leer I960 

William M. Dean 1961 

Betty L. Iang, Associate Member 1957 

George H. Kidder, Associate Member 1958 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Henry J. Davis 1957 

Manley B. Boyce 1958 

Andrew J. Dougherty 1959 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk, ex officio 1957- 

MEMBER OF DISTRICT NURSING COMMITTEE 

Louise H. McClennen 1957 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

FENCE VIEWERS Term Expires 

George G. Tarbell 1957 

Guilbert Winchell 1957 

FIELD DRIVERS 

Albert S. Brooks 1957 

William H. Browning 1957 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Ethan Murphy, Chairman 1957 

Albert Ayery, III 1957 

John M. Barnaby 1957 

Astrid L. Donaldson • 1957 

John B. Garrison 1957 

Ernest L. Johnson 1957 

Roland W. Robbins 1957 

Edward D. Rooney 1957 

Sadie J. Sherman 1957 

SURVEYOR OF CORD WOOD 

Robert Ralston 1957 

VETERANS' AGENT 

J. Lewis Cunningham 1957 

CARETAKER OF TOWN HALL 

Orrin C. Wood 195? 





JURY LIST, 1956 




Name 


Residence 


Occupation 


Iawrence B. Anderson 


Beaver Pond Road 


Architect 


Gertrude C. Bliss 


Sandy Pond Road 


Housewife 


George U. Browning, Jr. 


Conant Road 


Farmer 


Warren Carstensen 


Old Concord Road 


Retail Fuel 


Robert T. Church 


Beaver Pond Road 


Port Engineer 


Robert P. Condit 


Concord Road 


Manufacturer 


Dorothy B. Crawford 


Weston Road 


Housewife 


Elinor S. DeFord 


Weston Road 


Housewife 


Elizabeth H. Doherty 


Tower Road 


Housewife 


Eliot DuBois 


Sandy Pond Road 


Engineer 


Richard C. Fleck 


Sandy Pond Road 


Investment Officer 


Harold W. Foley 


Mill Street 


Research Engineer 


Norman W. Fradd 


Grasshopper Lane 


Physical Director 


Frederick W. Greer 


Huckleberry Hill 


Manufacturer 


Maurice K. Herliny 


South Great Road 


Ass't. Manager 


Stephen W. Herthel 


Concord Road 


General Manager 


Kenneth C. Hess 


Tower Road 


Executive 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Name 
Harrison Hoyt 
Lucretia B. Hoover 
Eliot Hubbard, 3rd 
Emily K. Kubik 
James V. Lennon 
Harold S. Liddick 
John F. Loud 
Donald C. Loveys 
Iawrence Moore 
Ethan A. Murphy 
David D. Ogden 
Eleanor A. Pallotta 
Catherine A. Rowe 
Mary C. Van Leer 
Leslie M. Willard 



Residence 
Huntley lane 
Trapelo Road 
Winter Street 
Lincoln Road 
Lincoln Road 
Juniper Ridge 
Woods End Road 
Hillside Road 
Trapelo Road 
Pierce Hill Road 
Trapelo Road 
Winter Street 
Winter Street 
Old Sudbury Road 
Giles Road 



Occupation 
Ass f t. Manager 
Housewife 
Buyer 

Research Ass't. 
Accountant 
Chemist 

Invest. Counsellor 
Construction 
Executive 
Instructor 
Investments 
Housewife 
Real Estate 
Housewife 
State House 



Appointed July 2nd, 1956 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 



Walter L. Hill 



George H, Kidder 



Walter Bergquist 



EXECUTIVE BOARD OF THE COMMUNITY COUNCIL 
AT BEDFORD AIR BASE 



Sumner Smith 



William M. Rand 



INSURANCE POLICY STUDY COMMITTEE 



Anthony Faunce 



George G. Tarbell 
William M. Rand 
George H. Kidder 



John W. White 



Ernest Fuller 



George G. Tarbell, Jr. 
SELECTMEN'S CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 



Sumner Smith 
Malcolm Donaldson 
James DeNormandie 



Henry DeC. Ward 
IEGAL ADVISOR 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 
ASSISTANT TREASURER 



M. Elizabeth Causer 



Term Expires 
1957 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



APPOINTED BI THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

COMMUNITY NURSE Term Expires 

Marian H. Ober " 1957 

BURIAL AGENT 
William H. Davis 1957 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Andrew J. Dougherty 1957 



APPOINTED BI THE MOIERATOR 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

F. Winchester Denio, Chairman 1957 

William N. Page, Clerk 1958 

Leonard C. Larrabee 1957 

Paul L. Norton 1959 

Russell L. Haden, Jr 1959 

MEMORIAL DAI COMMITTEE 

Stuart B. Avery 1957 

Joseph Campobasso 1957 

Elin E. Lennon 1957 

Ruth P. Warner 1957 

Rev. Morris R. Robinson 1957 

FOURTH OF JUU COMMITTEE 

Everett A. Black 1957 

Thelma W. Cibel 1957 

Gertrude W. Fitts 1957 

William L. Grinnell . 1957 

Edward D. Rooney 1957 

L3BRARI ADDITION COMMITTEE 
Kenneth W. Bergen John B. Tew 

Secor D. Browne Morley M. John 

VETERANS' MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 
J. Lewis Cunningham Richard J. Eaton 

Robert E. White 

LONG-TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 
William M. Rand Charles P. Kindleberger 

Maurice E. Shank 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



FIRE STATION PLANS COMMITTEE 



Leo J. Algeo 
Iavrence E. Anderson 



William N. Swift 



Robert H. Booth 
Andrew J. Dougherty 



EIEMENTAHI SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE 
Andrew J. Dougherty George H. Kidder 

Gerard C. Henderson, Jr. Ernest P. Neumann 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 



Charles H. Blake 



MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMITTEE 

John B. Tew 
Barbara K. Warner 



PUBLIC LAND COMMITTEE 



Albert M. Avery 

Lucy E. Bygrave 



Walter F. Bogner 
Arthur T. Howard 



Russell P. Mahan 



APPOINTED BI THE CIVIL EEFENSE DIRECTOR 



MEMBERS OF AUXILIARY POLICE FORCE 



Walter Belanger 
Walter Bonia 
Sheldon A. Briggs 
Sec or Browne 
Stanley Cibel 
Robert C. Day 
Allen Dougherty 
Richard J. Eaton 
Warren F. Flint 
Donald A. Gilfoy 
Lowell Rolling sworth 
Eliot Hubbard, 3rd 
Medford E. Huntley 
David W. Kirkpatrick 
Harold Lawson 
Charles MacFarland 
H. Arnold MacLean 
James W. Mar 
Gerald Fahringer 



John W. McLellan 
Thomas R. Morse 
W. Newton Nelson 
Foster Nystrom 
William Powers 
Roland W. Robbins 
Allston Riley 
Charles A. Snelling 
Howard Snelling 
Henry Sturm 
Didrick Tonseth 
Robert Thorson 
John B. Warner 
G. Arnold Wiley 
Edwin L. Williams 
Arthur Witham 
Henry WooCs 
Thomas K. Worthing ton 



HONORARY SELECTMEN 



RESOLUTION 



BE IT RESOLVED, that in honor of past service to the town of 
Lincoln, County of Middlesex, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, we do 
hereby proclaim that the title of Honorary Selectmen has been con- 
ferred on the following men: 

Robert D. Donaldson John Todd 

Joseph S. Hart Albert A. Schaal 

George G. Tarbell John 0. Wilson 

Sumner Smith Edmund W. Giles 

Robert D. Donaldson, Jr. Henry DeC. Ward 



Charles K. Fitts 
William T. King 
Elliott V. Grabill 

Selectmen of Lincoln 
December 27, 1956 



(^own Cjovernment 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Administration 

On March 26th the Board organized, electing Charles K. Fitts 
Chairman. One of the decisions to be made immediately involved the 
direction to be taken in the general management of the Town. The 
office of Administrative Assistant had been vacated through the resig- 
nation of Mr. Leslie Willard, and we felt before any moves were made 
toward filling this vacancy an evaluation of the position should be 
made. It seemed evident to us that, regardless of such qualified 
advice we should seek, better executive attention would result by 
assigning each member of the Board certain direct responsibilities. 

Heads of departments are held accountable to the Selectmen for the 
efficiency and effectiveness of their operation with ample recourse 
to either one or all members of this Board for consultation. Final 
decisions, however, are based on the judgment of the entire Board. 

Although the scheduled meetings of the Selectmen are held the 2nd 
and £th Monday of every month, we have met every Monday evening, and, 
in fact, more often as demands warranted. In this way the Selectmen 
have been able to confer with most of the Boards and Committees of 
the Town. These contacts have been extremely helpful to us, and, 
although advice on the subject of retaining an Administrative Assis- 
tant indicated such a position did not exist, we were convinced, as a 
result of these meetings, steps should be taken to supplement the 
needs of the Town in its engineering requirements. 

With Engineering and Executive Administration separated, we ap- 
pointed Mrs. Elizabeth Causer Executive Secretary of the Board of 
Selectmen and have recommended in the 1957 budget that the sum of 
$3,000 be appropriated for experienced engineering services and con- 
sultation. 

A subject of prime importance to the Town involves amending the 
Building Code. The present code passed by the Town in 1938 is 
limited in scope and places an undue burden on the Town financially. 

On April 9, 1956, the Selectmen appointed a Building Code Com- 
mittee whose members are: 

Walter L. Hill 

Walter Bergquist 

George H. Kidder 
This Committee deserves high praise for the time-consuming conscien- 
tious work involved in preparing a Code which will be submitted to 
the Town for action. 

10 



SELECTMEN 



On overall matters of policy we felt the need of establishing 
continuity vital to the maintenance of the fundamental government of 
Lincoln. Many perplexing problems arise requiring decisions effect- 
ing the character, welfare and future of the Town as a whole. With 
this phase in mind, a Selectmen's Conference Committee was appointed 
November 19, 1956. Members of this Committee are: 

Sumner Smith 

George G. Tarbell 

William Rand 

James DeNormandie 

Henry DeC. Ward 

Malcolm Donaldson 

George H. Kidder 

Although quarterly meetings with this Committee are planned, their 
advice and assistance to us in two meetings held in November and 
December have been of immeasurable value. 

Town Hall 

Municipal growth has placed a heavy burden on the existing facili- 
ties of the Town Hall, dedicated to the Town in 1892. 

Your Selectmen feel it important to continue the use of this build- 
ing for Town offices, as a meeting place where space permits, and, 
in general, secure these uses for the forseeable future. It is with 
this in mind we are recommending, under a separate Article, archi- 
tectural changes effecting the Lower Hall. From time to time, moder- 
ate repairs have kept the original slate roof in fair condition. We 
have been advised that partial replacement of the roof to stop water 
seepage into the Upper Town Hall would be only temporary in nature 
and would cost approximately $750.00. We are recommending replace- 
ment of the entire roof at an estimated cost of $3,000. 

Fierce House 

Bad leaks due to broken copper roof troughs and gutters were im- 
periling the interior of the Pierce House. The Selectmen have 
authorized the use of funds from the trust to put the roof in good 
order and to repair the ceilings damaged and considered unsafe. It 
is anticipated that replacement of both the upper and lower rails of 
the widow's walk will be needed to save the columns which, if allowed 
to weather further, would mean replacement at an almost prohibitive 
cost. 

Highway Building 

It was considered detrimental to the Town not to take immediate 
action in preventing further deterioration of the Highway Building. 

11 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



A transfer from the Reserve Fund amounting to $865.00 was approved 
and work has now been completed involving the pointing of all masonry 
joints and replacement of some roof flashing. 

Communications 

Further study of our communication system will be made during the 
coming year, as we do not feel we have arrived at the eventual solu- 
tion in this regard. 

Changes in the trunk lines were made in May to free all emergency 
calls coming through the switchboard. Also, from an operating view- 
point, direct lines to Fire and Police personnel were re-aligned for 
faster service. Twenty-four hour emergency service is available by 
dialing CL 9-8111 or Operator - Emergency, and we urge all people 
calling to please state clearly their name, address and nature of 
emergency. All business calls to the town should be made by dialing 
CL 9-8850. 

Police 

Residential growth combined with automobile registrations which 
have more than doubled since 1947 have placed a strenuous protection 
and enforcement obligation on this department. Present personnel 
consisting of the chief and three patrolmen is on duty six days a 
week working in two shifts per day. 

We are recommending that the position of Sergeant be established 
to create executive coverage in the absence of the Chief, and that an 
additional patrolman be appointed as requested by Chief Algeo. 

Progressive steps have been taken to discipline speed violators, 
and it is our intention to see that this policy is continued. Addi- 
tional speed zone signs will be installed in compliance with the speed 
zone regulation approved by the Department of Public Works during 1952, 

Under a separate article we are requesting the Town to authorize 
replacement of the police -equipped ranch wagon. This type of cruise 
car has proved a valuable asset in general police work. 

We are all indebted to the efforts of Chief Algeo and his staff 
for the efficient and understanding application of police responsi- 
bilities. 

Hours of active police coverage : Stand-by duty : 

8:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M. 5 P. M. to 6 P. M. 

6:00 P. M. to 2:00 A. M. 2 A. M. to 8 A. M. 



12 



SELECTMEN 

Fire Department 

With the development of Lincoln as a town unique in its desira- 
bility as a place to live, our position is one of maintaining the 
balance of service adequate for the welfare and safety of our citi- 
zens. 

The Lincoln Fire Department is composed of a governing board of 
three appointed engineers plus twenty-seven officers and men. Al- 
though the time for partial permanent coverage may not be far removed, 
the continued and loyal willingness to serve on a call basis will 
still be the backbone of this force. 

Centralization of headquarters for the Fire and Police Departments 
will assist immeasurably in the effectiveness of this department both 
from a training and morale standpoint, but the time has come when 
immediate consideration must be given to the apparatus itself. Under 
two separate articles we are requesting ratification of the acts of 
the selectmen in authorizing immediate conversion and replacement of 
the pump in Engine 32 damaged beyond repair in December. The second 
article will request the town for funds to replace Engine 33. This 
equipment has been in service since 1936 and we feel it is imperative 
that a standard make 750 gallon high-low pressure pump be purchased. 
Upon delivery of this apparatus, which will take anywhere from five 
to six months, Engine 33 would be transferred to the Civilian Defense 
Organization and kept in reserve for future use. 

To Chief Dougherty, the Engineers and all members of the Depart- 
ment, we express our appreciation for the valuable service given. 

Highway Department 

The effectiveness of this Department depends on two factors, ade- 
quate equipment and advanced planning. We thought it would be of 
interest to inventory the equipment in view of recommendations we 
are making. 

(1) 1946 White 5 ton truck 

(2) 1956 Chevrolet 2 ton truck 

(3) 1946 White 5 ton truck 

(4) 1948 White 5 ton truck 

(5) 1951 Ford ij- ton truck 

1952 Chevrolet \ ton pickup truck 
1946 Gallion motor grader 
1949 Hough pay loader 

Austin street sweeper (This used sweeper was 

purchased in 1949) 
2 sand spreaders 
5 snow plows 

13 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

We are recommending immediate replacement of one of the 1946 
White trucks, the front end loader and the Superintendent's pick up 
truck. 

Programming during 1956 included the following roads: 
Route 117, completed under Flood Control. 
Route 126, Chapter 90 Maintenance. 
Trapelo Road, Chapter 90 Maintenance & Construction. 
Brooks Road, primary surfacing. 
Virginia Road, partial improvement. 
Pierce Hill Road, Flood Relief. 
Mill Street, Flood Relief. 

Many conferences have been held with the State Department of Public 
Works relative to receiving our just share of State Funds. Demands 
from this level under Chapter 90 Construction indicate the need for 
careful study and appraisal of the effects upon the Town. However, 
we do recommend that the allotment of $13,000 be used to surface 
Trapelo Road with Type I bituminous concrete. This surface will 
start at the Center and run easterly as far as possible within the 
financial limits indicated. 

The sum of $4,500 allotted for Chapter 90 Maintenance will be used 
chiefly on Route 126 near lake Walden. 

We are recommending that Silver Hill Road be laid out and taken as 
a Town road. Some of the very hazardous spots could then be improved 
by the Town without the danger of this road becoming a speedway. 
Tower Road will be improved to accommodate automatic gates at the 
Boston & Maine crossing. 

It is our suggestion that the direct allotment under Chapter 718 
be applied to improvements of Farrar Road which is in immediate need 
of repair. Other areas to receive attention are: 

Brooks Road 

Virginia Road 

Sandy Pond Road at Sandy Pond 

We commend the efforts of Mr. Maher and his men who have had un- 
usual obstacles to overcome both in breakdown of equipment and un- 
precedented snow and ice. 

Health and Sanitation 

Special sanitary engineering services have been retained for the 
Board of Health covering installation of all new sewerage systems. 
This has proven satisfactory to the Board and will be continued. 

New regulations governing the hours and use of the Town Dump have 
been put into effect and better control has resulted. Use of the 

U 



SEIECTMEN 



Town Dump facilities for construction clearance disposal has been 
expressly forbidden without the approval of the Selectmen. The dump 
is open on Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from 10:30 A. M. to 
5:00 P. M. and on those days is under the supervision of a custodian. 

Insurance 

A complete review of the Town's insurance has been made by a 
committee appointed by the Selectmen. Members of this committee are: 
Mr. Anthony Faunce, Chairman 
Mr. George G. Tarbell, Jr. 
Mr. Ernest Fuller 

As a result of several conferences, certain changes have been made 
and additional insurance coverage in other areas is recommended. 

We have converted all fire coverage on Town buildings and contents 
from scheduled to blanket coverage. Additional coverage is recom- 
mended in the 1957 budget to include: 

1. Increases in boiler insurance. 

2. Addition of public liability insurance to include uses given 
the Town Hall and the Charles Sumner Smith Auditorium. 

Although not shown as an insurance item, we are proceeding im- 
mediately with the microfilming of valuable records. Storage of 
these films will be made in a vault removed from the metropolitan 
area and should serve to re-establish vital information if disaster 
strikes. 

Finance 

Schools will continue to occupy a substantial segment of the Town's 
annual operating cost. In working with the Finance Committee on a 
recommended budget for 1957, we have made every effort to be realistic, 

Capital items appearing in separate articles of the warrant are 
deemed essential to the continued preservation of service and proper- 
ties without extravagance. 

Air Force Cambridge Research Center 

We all recognize the importance of the work going on at this center. 
The task of mutually understanding one another's problem is a con- 
tinuing one, and the Selectmen, School Committee and Mr. Douglass 
Roberts have conferred many times with Colonel Woodrow Dunlop and his 
staff on matters involving the relationship between Hanscom Field and 
the Town of Lincoln. 



15 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Any arbitrary stand could conceivably do injury to the cause of 
National Defense and in turn the very town itself. However, the 
citizens of Lincoln have accepted their just share of these obliga- 
tions. It becomes more apparent that any expansion beyond the 
bounds presently conceded would alter our fiscal position and the 
continuity of residential growth essential to the preservation of 
this New England community. 

Every effort will be made to pursue our relationship with the 
Air Force within the limits of common understanding and consideration, 

Route #2 

As a result of the Planning Board's survey on Route #2 re-location, 
a presentation was made in June to the Chief Engineer of the Depart- 
ment of Public Works by both the Planning Board and the Selectmen. 
Studies being made by the State were not sufficient in detail at that 
time to either support or eliminate this presentation. 

Major efforts have been concentrated on the re-location of Route 
#2 from the Cambridge line to Route #128, and a public hearing on 
this proposal was attended in January of this year by members of the 
Planning Board and the Selectmen. Lincoln has been promised the 
opportunity of working closely with the Department of Public Works on 
this problem, and the citizens should and will be given ample oppor- 
tunity to express their feelings on this matter as plans develop. 

The impact of this limited access way running through Lincoln must 
be viewed from many sides. Present dislocation will have to be 
balanced with an appraisal of future land use brought about by such 
takings. 

C omments 

We are all fortunate in having the experienced assistance of 
Elizabeth Causer, who, with her staff, has been untiring in her 
efforts. 

Thanks are also extended for the helpful suggestions received from 
other Town officials and the many citizens whose interest and advice 
we most heartily solicit. ■ 

Respectfully submitted: 

Charles K. Fitts, Chairman 
William T. King 
Elliott V. Grabill 

Board of Selectmen 
16 



TCWN MEETINGS 



TOWN CIERK'S REPORT 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and activi- 
ties and issues licenses and certificates. His duties include 
recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and elections, and notify- 
ing the Selectmen and other officers concerned of appropriations 
which have been voted. 

The record of Registered Voters of Lincoln is kept at the Clerk's 
office. Persons wishing to become voters in the Town should com- 
municate with the Clerk. 

ANNUAL TCWN MEETING 
MONDAI, MARCH 19, 1956 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was called to order 
by the Moderator, Mr. Donald P. Donaldson, on Monday, March 19, 1956, 
at 7:30 P. M. Those in attendance besides the Moderator were: Ed- 
mund W. Giles, Chairman of the Selectmen; Henry DeC. Ward and William 
T. King, Selectmen; William H. Davis, Town Clerk, and Mrs. Henry DeC. 
Ward. On motion duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn the meeting 
until Wednesday, March 21, at 7:30 P. M. The reason for the post- 
ponement was a second heavy snow storm in two days. The meeting was 
adjourned at 7:40 P. M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TCWN MEETING 
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 1956 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was called to order 
by the Moderator, Mr. Donald P. Donaldson, at 7:30 o'clock P. M. 
The return of the Warrant was read and the following business was 
transacted after the Moderator called attention to Article #1 
(Election of Officers) . 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, com- 
missioners, trustees, and other officers required by law to be elected 
by ballot or otherwise. 

Voted: That Albert Brooks and C. Lee Todd, Jr. be elected 
Measurers of Wood and Bark for the ensuing year. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Voted: That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees and 
Trustees as printed in the Town Report be accepted and the reports 
of the following Committees be accepted as interim reports, and that 



17 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



the Committees and their unexpended appropriations be continued: 
School Building Addition #2 Committee, Acquisition of Public Land 
Committee; and that the following reports be accepted as final: 
Bedford Airport Committee, Department of Public Works Committee; and 
further 

Voted: That the following unexpended balances of appropriations 
of prior years which have been carried forward into 1956 shall be 
cancelled and the sum thereof added to the surplus funds of the Town: 
Assessors 1 Maps $ 147.75 

Zoning Survey 9.76 

School Addition #1 411.24 

School Addition #2 24,000.00 

Additional School Land 

Committee 750.00 

Building Code Committee 195.25 

Bi-centennial Committee 81.29 

$25,595.29 
and that the sum of $136.99 in General Funds of the Town, which came 
from the Cemetery Investment Fund be returned to that Fund. 

Under this Article, Mr. James DeNormandie asked for permission, 
which was granted, to present the following resolutions, which were 
adopted, followed by loud and prolonged applause: 

Resolved: That the citizens of Lincoln in Town Meeting assembled 
on March 21, 1956, hereby express their appreciation and gratitude 
to Raymond Emerson of Concord for his generous action in reserving 
water rights to the Town of Lincoln in the property which he donated 
to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the Walden Pond State Reser- 
vation, and be it further 

Resolved: That record of this action be included in the minutes 
of this meeting, and a true copy be transmitted to Mr. Emerson. 

Article 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 
elective officers of the Town and to determine whether any Department, 
Board of Committee shall be authorized to employ for additional com- 
pensation any of its members and to fix additional compensation of 
such members. 

Voted: That the salaries of the elected officers of the Town 
for the current year be fixed at the following amounts respectively: 

Selectmen, each 

Treasurer 

Collector of Taxes 

Town Clerk 

Assessors, Chairman 



Article 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in relation to the 
ne. 
Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate for the 1956 fiscal 

18 



$200.00 


Assessors, other 




200.00 


members, each 


$175.00 


2,000.00 


Auditor 


50.00 


450.00 


Water Commissioners, 




200.00 


each 


75,00 




Tree Warden 


200.00 



TOWN MEETINGS 



year the ninety-two (92) separate appropriations recommended in the 
budget for general purposes reported by the Finance Committee as 
printed on pages 152 to 156 inclusive of the 1955 Town Report, except 
that: Item 8, Protectograph, is increased from $250.00 to $525.00; 
Item 18, Salaries, from $250.00 to $500.00; Item 19, Supplies and 
Miscellaneous, decreased from $700.00 to $550.00: Item 14A added in 
the amount of $4.00.00; Item 55, Snow removal, is increased from 
$5,500.00 to $5,000.00; Item 81, Town Report, is increased from 
$1,000.00 to $1,062.05: Item 92, Reserve Fund, is increased from 
$8,000.00 to $10,000.00; the entire amount to be taken from Oerlay 
Surplus and any unexpended balance to be returned thereto, and 
further, that to the extent noted with respect to any item in said 
budget, funds therefor shall be taken from the source or sources 
indicated, and in addition that $38.81 of the sum appropriated under 
Item 63 for Instruction be taken from the account "Grammar School 
Fund Income", and it was further 

Voted : That the Town appropriate for the Water Department for 
1956 the four separate appropriations recommended as Items 93 to 96 
inclusive in the budget of the Finance Committee for said Department, 
as printed on page 157 of said 1955 Town Report, and that the sums be 
taken from the Water Department Treasury. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning January 1, 1957, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 
17, Chapter 4A, General Laws. 

Voted : That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen 
be authorized to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1957, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor payable within one year and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year 
in accordance with Section 17, Chapter AA, General Laws. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to conduct services on 
Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, appoint a committee, raise and 
appropriate money, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Moderator be authorized to appoint a committee 
of five to plan and carry out exercises on Memorial Day, the thirtieth 
of May next, and that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $150 
for the use of such Committee in connection with these exercises. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to celebrate Independence 
Day, the fourth of July, appoint a committee, raise and appropriate 
money, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Moderator be authorized to appoint a committee 

19 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



of five to plan a celebration for Independence Day, the fourth of 
July, and that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 
for the use of said Committee. (A motion to substitute $250.00 for 
$1,000.00 was lost) . 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $508.19 to pay the following unpaid 1955 bills: 
Library $6.95 

Insurance 26.73 

Board of Health 290.46 

Highways 1.25 

Cemetery 182.80 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the sum of $298.66 be appropriated to pay the follow- 
ing unpaid bills of 1955, said amount to be taken from Free Cash: 
Library $6.95 

Board of Health 290.46 

Highways 1.25 

$298.66 
and further that the sum of $209.53 be appropriated to pay the follow- 
ing unpaid bills of 1955, said amount to be taken from Free Cash: 
Insurance $26.73 

Cemetery 182.80 

$209.53 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to purchase the following town vehicles to replace 
existing equipment: Police Department: Police car; Highway Depart- 
ment: Truck; or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $1,4.50.00 
for the purchase of a police car, Chevrolet to be turned in, and that 
the sum of $3,185.00 be appropriated for the purchase of a highway 
truck, $2,500.00 to be taken from the unexpended appropriation voted 
for a highway truck in 1954. and $685.00 to be taken from the Highway 
Machinery Fund . 

Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a gift 
from E. W. Giles, Inc. a parcel of land in Lincoln shown as lot 8 on 
a plan entitled: "Subdivision of land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, 
owned by E. W. Giles, Inc.' 1 , dated June 28, 1954, Snelling and Hilton, 
Registered Land Surveyors, and recorded in Middlesex County So. 
District Deeds, said land being bounded and described according to 
said plan: Southwesterly by State Highway (Route 2A) thirty-seven 
and fifteen hundredths (37.15) feet; Northwesterly by Lot 7 on said 
plan forty and seventy-eight hundredths (4.0.78) feet; Northeasterly 
by Virginia Road fifty-one and ninety-four hundredths (51.94) feet; 
Southeasterly by the intersection of Virginia Road and State Highway 
sixteen and seventy-six hundredths (16.76) feet, containing 1,192 

20 



TOWN MEETINGS 



square feet of land more or less, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: That the Town accept with thanks from E. W. Giles, Inc. 
a parcel of land in Lincoln shown as lot 8 on a plan entitled "Sub- 
division of land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, owned by E. W. Giles, 
Inc.", dated June 28, 1954, Snelling and Hilton, Registered Land 
Surveyors, and recorded in Middlesex South District Deeds, said land 
being bounded and described according to said plan: Southwesterly bv 
State Highway (Route 2A) thirty-seven and fifteen hundredths (37.15) 
feet; Northwesterly by lot 7 on said plan forty and seventy -eight 
hundredths (40.78) feet; Northeasterly by Virginia Road fifty-one 
and ninety -four hundredths (51.94) feet; Southeasterly by the inter- 
section of Virginia Road and State Highway sixteen and seventy-six 
hundredths (16.76) feet, containing 1,192 square feet of land more or 
less. The above action was greeted with prolonged applause. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $6,000.00 for the purpose of continuing the East Middlesex 
Mosquito Control project as provided under Chapter 252 of the General 
laws, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $6,000.00 
for the purpose of continuing the East Middlesex Mosquito Control 
project, as provided under Chapter 252 of the General Laws. 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to extend the street lights southerly on Old County 
Road from Trapelo Road to property now owned by Millard Meiss, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will provide for a committee to 
prepare preliminary plans for an addition to the Library, appropriate 
the sum of $3,000.00 therefor, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Moderator appoint a committee of four to 
collaborate with the Library Trustees and the Librarian, the whole to 
constitute a building committee to prepare preliminary plans for an 
addition to the Library, and that the sum of $3,000.00 be raised and 
appropriated for that purpose. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 670 
of the Acts of 1955 which provides for an increase in the annual 
amounts of certain pensions, retirement allowances, annuities and 
other benefits payable by the Commonwealth and its political sub- 
divisions to certain former employees and persons claiming under them, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town accept Chapter 670 of the Acts of 1955 
which provides for an increase. in the annual amounts of certain pen- 
sions, retirement allowances, annuities and other benefits payable by 

21 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



the Commonwealth and its political subdivisions to certain former 
employees and persons claiming under them. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to appoint a committee 
and raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of adding 
dates to the Memorial on the Library grounds, also to provide a 
permanent honor roll for veterans of all wars, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Voted; That the Moderator be authorized to appoint a committee 
of three for the purpose of adding dates to the Memorial on the 
Library grounds, also to provide a permanent honor roll for veterans 
of all wars, and that the sum of $1,000.00 be appropriated for the 
use of said Committee, said sum to be taken from free cash. 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to change the name of 
that section of Upland Fields Road, beginning at Lincoln Road and 
extending to Beaver Pond Road, to Beaver Pond Road, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Voted; To change the name of that section of Upland Field Road, 
beginning at Lincoln Road and extending to Beaver Pond Road, to 
Beaver Pond Road. 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public 
way the remaining portion of the private road known as Upland Fields 
Road, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted; That subject to the receipt of a deed under easement in 
form satisfactory to the Selectmen the Town accept as a public way 
the private road known as Upland Fields Road. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money to widen and repair Virginia Road, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Voted; That the Town appropriate the sum of $2,200.00 for the 
purpose of repairing and widening Virginia Road for a distance of 
approximately 1,000 feet northerly from the junction of Old Bedford 
Road, and that said sum be taken from free cash. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to continue a committee 
appointed by the Moderator as a Long Term Capital Requirements Com- 
mittee, raise and appropriate the sum of $350.00 for the use of said 
committee, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted; That the Moderator appoint a committee of three registered 
voters to continue the study of the long-term capital requirements of 
the Town and report to the Town at the next Annual Meeting; and that 
there be appointed, to meet and consult with this Committee, three 
advisory members, of whom one shall be a member of the Board of 
Selectmen, one a member of the Finance Committee, and one a member of 
the Planning Board, each of the advisory members to be appointed by 



22 



TOWN MEETINGS 



the Chairman of his Board or Committee; and that the sum of $350.00 
be appropriated for the use of this Committee, said sum to be taken 
from Free Cash. 

Article 21. To see if the Town will accept as a public way the 
private road known as Morningside Lane, as shown on Plan #52$ of 
1953, recorded with South Middlesex District Registry of Deeds at the 
end of Book 8057, approved by the Planning Board of the Town of 
Lincoln October 22, 1952, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted; That subject to the receipt of a deed under easement 
in form satisfactory to the Selectmen the Town accept as a public 
way the private road known as Morningside Lane, as shown on plan #525 
of 1953, recorded with South Middlesex District Registry of Deeds at 
the end of Book 8057, and approved by the Planning Board of the Town 
of Lincoln October 22, 1952. 

Article 22. To see if the Town will accept as a public way the 
private road known as Sunnyside lane, as shown on plan #524 of 1953, 
recorded with South Middlesex District Registry of Deeds at the end 
of Book 8057, approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln 
January 21, 1953, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted; That subject to the receipt of a deed under easement in 
form satisfactory to the Selectmen the Town accept as a public way 
the private road known as Sunnyside Lane, as shown on plan #524 of 
1953, recorded with South Middlesex District Registry of Deeds at the 
end of Book 8057, and approved tjy the Planning Board of the Town of 
Lincoln January 21, 1953. 

Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to accept the sum of 
$1,000.00 given to it by the Lincoln School Association and hold said 
sum, together with such additional sums of money or such other 
property as may be added thereto, in trust, as the Lincoln Permanent 
Scholarship Fund, for the purposes, in the manner and under the terms 
and conditions set forth in a certain Agreement and Declaration of 
Trust, a copy of which was deposited with the Town Clerk on February 
16, 1956, and has, since that date, been available for inspection by 
registered voters of the Town, and the provisions of which may be 
fairly summarized as follows; 

The Town agrees to hold the fund in trust in accordance with the 
terms of the trust instrument, and to act as trustee thereof. Since 
the instrument does not otherwise provide, the Fund is to be managed 
by the Lincoln Commissioners of Public Trust Funds, pursuant to 
Section 45, Chapter 41 of the General Laws. Articles third and 
fourth of the Trust, however, specifically provides that the dis- 
bursement of the Fund shall be under the sole control and direction 
of a Scholarship Fund Committee consisting of three Lincoln residents, 
one each to be appointed annually by the Moderator, the Chairman of 
the Lincoln School Committee and the senior member from Lincoln of 



23 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School committee. The Scholarship Fund 
Committee is given absolute discretion to disburse the Fund as a 
majority of its members deems most appropriate to aid deserving 
Lincoln children continue their formal education beyond high school. 
The Town, as trustee, is authorized to accept additions to the Fund 
and the instrument provides that both income and principal may be ex- 
pended unless the donor specifically directs that only the income of 
his gift is to be expended. There is no such restriction on the 
donation hereby made. The instrument gives the Trustee broad powers 
of investment and management of the type commonly found in modern 
trust instruments, and it contains a provision that it may be altered 
or amended upon recommendation of the Selectmen by majority vote at a 
Town Meeting, provided that the general purpose of aiding deserving 
Lincoln children continue their education may not be changed. An 
annual report of receipts, expenditures and property remaining in 
trust is to be published in the Town Report. Finally, the Town by 
majority vote is authorized to terminate the trust at any time and 
distribute the Fund to a Massachusetts charitable or educational 
corporation for the purpose of carrying out the general purpose of 
the trust. 

Voted; That the Town accept the sum of one thousand dollars 
($1,000.00) given to it by the Lincoln School Association, and hold 
said sum, together with such additional sums of money or such other 
property as may be added thereto, in trust, as the Lincoln Permanent 
Scholarship Fund, for the purposes, in the manner, and under the 
terms and conditions set forth in a certain Agreement and Declaration 
of Trust, a copy of which is in the possession of the Town Clerk, 
and that the Selectmen be, and they hereby are, authorized and 
directed to sign and acknowledge and affix the Town Seal to said 
Agreement and Declaration of Trust in the name and on behalf of the 
Town of Lincoln. 

Article 2U, To see if the Town will vote to appoint a Committee 
to prepare plans for a Fire Station, appropriate the sum of $5,000.00 
for the use of said Committee, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Moderator appoint a committee of five to prepare 
plans for a fire station, and that the sum of $5,000.00 be raised and 
appropriated for the use of the Committee. 

Article 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $5,000.00, to be used by the Committee appointed by the 
Moderator to study further the building needs of Lincoln schools, said 
sum to be taken from the unexpended balance to be returned to the Town 
by a similar committee appointed under Article 19 of the Warrant for 
the year 1954, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted; That the Moderator appoint a committee to study the 
building needs of the elementary schools and make its recommendation 
to the Town, and that the sum of $5,000.00 be appropriated for the 
use of this Committee for its stucjy and in developing plans and cost 



TOWN MEETINGS 



estimates, if required, said sum to be taken from free cash* 

Article 26. To see whether the Town will vote to amend the 
zoning by-law of the Town of Lincoln by the addition at the end of 
Section 7, of the additional subsection K, to read as follows: 

Section 7, K: All uses authorized by subsections (c) through 
(h) and (j) of this section, hereafter established or extended, shall 
provide on the lot a parking area equal to three times the ground 
floor area of all buildings on the premises, said parking area to 
have a treated surface and be located within a commercial district, 
except that after a public hearing with due notice given, the Board 
of Appeals may grant a special exception to this provision and allow 
a lesser but appropriate parking area where it finds that conditions 
exist in relation to the specific use involved which render the regu- 
lation unduly strict. 

Voted; That the zoning by-law of the Town of Lincoln be amended 
by the addition, at the end of Section 7, of the following: 

K) All uses authorized by. 3ub-sections (c) through (h) and (j) 
of this section, hereafter established or extended, shall provide on 
the lot a parking area, approved in writing as to lay out and design 
by the Lincoln Planning Board, equal of three times the ground floor 
area of all buildings or parts of buildings hereafter constructed on 
the premises, said parking area to have a treated surface and be 
located within a commercial district, except that after a public 
hearing with due notice given, the Board of Appeals may grant a 
special exception to this provision and allow lesser but appropriate 
parking areas where it finds that conditions exist in relation to 
the specific use involved which render this regulation unduly strict. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$8,000.00 for preliminary construction for two additional tennis 
courts at the Ball Field, appoint a committee with full authorization 
to carry out said construction, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: Under this article a motion "That the sum of $8,900.00 
be appropriated for the construction of two additional tennis courts 
at the Ball Field, that the moderator appoint a committee of three 
which shall have full power and authority to contract and take all 
other action necessary and proper within the limits of said $8,900.00 
to construct said courts" was lost with a vote of 140 against 110. 

Article 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money for extraordinary legal services not covered in the budget. 

Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $1,517.52 for extra- 
ordinary legal services, said sum to be taken from free cash. 

Article 29. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum 
of $2,800.00 to provide part of the cost of group life insurance, 



25 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



group accidental death and dismemberment insurance, and group general 
or blanket hospital, surgical and medical insurance for certain per- 
sons in the service of the Town. 

Voted: That the sum of $2,800.00 be raised and appropriated for 
the Town's share of the cost of group life insurance and hospital and 
medical expense insurance for full time Town employees, as provided 
in Chapter 32B of the General Laws, provided, however, that if the 
Town does not accept this Chapter by referendum at the election to 
be held on March 24, 1956, under Article 1 of the Warrant for this 
Meeting, this appropriation shall be automatically null and void. 

Voted to adjourn at 11:15 P. M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



ANNUAL TCWN EJECTION 
MARCH 24, 1956 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting, the polls were declared open by the Moderator at 12 o'clock 
Noon. Previously the ballot box had been inspected and the follow- 
ing Ballot Clerks duly sworn: Helena A. Dee, Helen Dougherty, Eliza- 
beth J. Snelling, Manley B. Boyce, D. Everett Sherman, Jr. and William 
0. Causer. The polls were declared closed at 7 o'clock P. M. with 
the following results. Total number of votes cast was 407. 

Town Clerk (1 year) William H. Davis 395 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 11 

Selectman (3 years) Charles K. Fitts 379 

Blanks 23 

Selectman (l year) Elliott V. Grabill 360 

Scattering 2 

Blanks 45 

Assessor (3 years) Elmer H. Ziegler 360 

Scattering 4 

Blanks 43 

Treasurer (l year) Frederick B. Taylor 379 

Blanks 28 

Collector of Taxes William H. Davis 390 

(3 years) Blanks 17 



26 





ELECTIONS 




Auditor (l year) 


Louis C. Farley, Jr. 
Blanks 


376 
31 


School Committee 
(3 years) 


John W. Carman 
William Powers 
Blanks 


330 

70 

7 


Regional District 
School Committee 
(3 years) 


John W. Carman 
William Powers 
Scattering 
Blanks 


362 

13 

2 

30 


Water Commissioner 
(3 years) 


Sumner Smith 
Blanks 


381 
26 


Board of Health 
(3 years) 


Walter L. Hill 

Scattering 

Blanks 


366 

2 

39 


Tree Warden (l year) 


Robert Ralston 
Clifford H. Bradley 
Blanks 


298 
93 
16 


Commissioner of 
Trust Funds (3 years) 


Richard F. Schroeder 
Blanks 


362 

45 


Trustee of Bemis Fund 
for Free Public 
Lectures (3 years) 


Mabel H. Todd 
Blanks 


382 
25 


Cemetery Commissioner 
(3 years) 


George E. Cunningham 
Blanks 


381 
26 


Planning Board 
(5 years) 


Walter F. Bogner 

Scattering 

Blanks 


349 
3 

55 


Director DeCordova 
Museum (4 years) 


John Q. Adams 
Blanks 


369 
38 



Question: Shall Chapter thirty-two B of the General Laws author- 
izing any county, city, town or district to provide a plan of 
group life insurance, group accidental death and dismemberment 
insurance, and group general or blanket hospital, surgical and 
medical insurance for certain persons in the service of such 
county, city, town or district, and their dependents, be accepted 
by this town? 

les 335 

No 31 

Blanks 41 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 

27 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



PRESIEENTIAL PRIMARY 
April 24, 1956 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Middlesex, ss. 

To either of the constables of the Town of Lincoln 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to meet in Charles Sumner Smith School Tuesday, the twenty- 
fourth day of April, 1956, at four o'clock P. M. for the following 
purposes: To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the 
election of candidates of political parties for the following offices: 

10 Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the Republican 
Party. 

10 Alternate Delegates at large to the National Convention of the 
Republican Party. 

2J+ Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the Democratic 
Party. 

24. Alternate Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the 
Democratic Party. 

2 District Delegates to the National Convention of the Republican 
Party, 5th Congressional District. 

2 Alternate District Delegates to the National Convention of the 
Republican Party, 5th Congressional District. 

U District Delegates to the National Convention of the Democratic 
Party, 5th Congressional District. 

2 Alternate District Delegates to the National Convention of the 
Democratic Party, 5th Congressional District. 

District Members of the State Committee (one man and one woman) 
for each political party for the 5th Senatorial District. 

28 Members of the Republican Town Committee. 

10 Members of the Democratic Town Committee. 

Presidential Preference. 

The polls will be open from four o'clock P. M. to seven- thirty 
o'clock P. M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon at the time and place of said meeting. Given under our hand 
this ninth day of April, A. D. , 1956. 

Charles K. Fitts ) Selectmen of 
Elliott V. Grabill ) Lincoln 
On the reverse of the Warrant is the following: Lincoln, Mass. 

April 16, 1956 
I have served this Warrant by posting attested copies at each of 
the Post Offices and at the Town House seven days before date of said 
Meeting. Iawrence Hallett, Constable 

28 



ELECTIONS 



In accordance with the provisions of the above Warrant the polls 
were declared open at four o'clock P. M. by Mr. Charles K. Fitts. 
Previously the return of the Warrant was read and the following Ballot 
Clerks were duly sworn: Helena A. Dee, Helen M. Dougherty, Elizabeth 
J. Snelling, Manley B. Boyce, D. Everett Sherman, Jr. and William 0. 
Causer. Mr. Elliott V. Grabill assumed the duties of Warden at 
6:10 P. M. and the polls were declared closed at 7:30 o 1 clock P. M. 
with the following results. The total vote was 228, - Republican, 
196; Democratic, 32. 

REPUBLICAN EELEGATES 



Christian A. Herter 




185 


Leverett Saltonstall 




181 


Joseph W. Martin, Jr. 




180 


Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. 




182 


Sinclair Weeks 




179 


Elmer C. Nelson 




180 


Ralph H. Bonnell 




177 


Esther W. Wheeler 




181 


Robert F. Bradford 




183 


Thomas Pappas 




176 


Blanks 




156 


ALTERNATE EELEGATES 




Basil Brewer 




178 


Bruce Crane 




178 


Katherine G. Howard 




180 


Charles J. Innes 




179 


Daniel J. Lynch 




177 


Maxwell M. Rabb 




180 


Richard F. Treadway 




178 


John A. Volpe 




175 


William W. White 




177 


Sumner G. Whittier 




181 


Blanks 




»77 


DISTRICT DELEGATES, 


5th DISTRICT 


Edward J. DeSaulnier, Jr. 




174 


Earle S. Tyler 




174 


Blanks 




u 



29 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



ALTERNATE IELEGATES, 5th DISTRICT 



Alan G. Adams 


175 


Muriel S. Barnes 


173 


Blanks 


hU 


STATE COMMITTEE , 5th MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (MAN) 


Herbert C. Harting 


31 


Fred H. Hitchcock, Jr. 


1U 


Blanks 


51 


STATE COMMITTEE , 5th MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (WOMAN) 


Anna R. Toscano 


176 


Blanks 


20 


TCWN COMMITTEE 




Pauline K. Rice 


181 


Gladys del. Herman 


180 


Iaura Thiessen 


181 


John B. Tew 


182 


Anthony Faunce 


178 


Arthur T. Howard 


180 


Charles K. Fitts 


179 


Robert W. Scott 


176 


William L. Grinnell 


175 


Eveleth R. Todd 


176 


Louis C. Farley, Jr. 


173 


Sumner Smith 


177 


John W. White 


176 


Eleanor A. Pallotta 


178 


Louis E. Paddock 


177 


James DeNormandie 


182 


George H. Kidder 


175 


J. Lewis Cunningham 


177 


D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 


181 


Robert H. Thorson 


176 


Kenneth W. Bergen 


177 


Helen K. Swanson 


175 


Richard B. Rice 


173 


Nancy D. Mellish 


174 


Miriam Jagger 


177 


Helen H. Greene 


173 


Not on ballot but both written 


in: 


William H. Davis 


111 


Philip J. Constant ine 


92 


Scattering 


2 


Blanks 


587 


30 





ELECTIONS 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

Eisenhower 158 

Stevenson 1 

Lodge 1 

Ives 1 

Herter 1 

Laucsh 1 

Blanks 22 

DEMOCRATIC DELEGATES 

John F. Kenned^ 28 

Paul A. Dever 28 

John Wells McCormack 28 

John B. Hynes 28 

William H. Burke, Jr. 28 

Margaret M. O'Riordan 28 

James M, Curley 28 

Thomas J. Buckley 28 

Edward J. Cronin 28 

John C. Powers 28 

Michael F. Skerry 28 

John A. Callahan 28 

J. William Belanger 28 

Daniel Rudsten 28 

Ida R. Lyons 28 

Garrett H. Byrne 28 

Daniel H. Brunton 28 

James D. O'Brien 28 

John J. Kane 28 

Howard W. Fitzpatrick 28 

John S. Begley 28 

James J. Corbett 28 

Jackson J. Holtz 28 

Blanks 96 

DEMOCRATIC ALTERNATE IELEGATES 

Joseph A. De Guglielmo 28 

J # Henry Goguen 28 

Chester A. Dolan 28 

Michael LoPresti 28 

Peter J. Rzeznikiewicz 28 

Francis E. Lavigne 28 

Salvatore Camileo 28 

Leonard J. Warner 28 

Silas F. Taylor 28 

Mary A. Tomasello 28 

31 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Hugh J. McLaughlin 




28 


Doris M. Racucot 




28 


Anna Sullivan 




28 


Mary DePasquale Murray 




28 


Charles M. Collatos 




28 


Anthony M. Scibelli 




28 


Matthew L. McGrath, Jr. 




28 


Joseph Garczynski, Jr. 




28 


Edward Krock 




28 


James R. Carter 




28 


Thomas J. Hannon 




28 


Harry L. Silva 




28 


Jean S. LeCompte 




28 


John F. Cahill 




28 


Blanks 




96 


DISTRICT DELEGATES, 


5th DISTRICT 


Edward P. Gilgun 




27 


William C. Geary 




27 


Daniel D. 0«Dea 




27 


Soterios G. Zaharoolis 




27 


Blanks 




20 


ALTERNATE DISTRICT DELEGATES, 


5th DISTRICT 


Thomas F. Tracy 




29 


Lawrence E. Corcoran 




29 


Blanks 




6 


STATE COMMITTEE , 5th MIDDIESEX DISTRICT (MAN) 


William F. Cloran 




10 


Harry C. Shannon 




3 


Thomas F. Tracy 




10 


Blanks 




9 


STATE COMMITTEE , 5th MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (WOMAN) 


Agnes J. Flynn 




11 


Alice D. Sullivan 




10 


Blanks 




11 


TOWN COMMITTEE 




Andrew J. Dougherty 




25 


Henry M. Morgan 




25 


Robert Bygrave 




25 


Sarah E # Brown 




25 



32 



TOWN MEETINGS 



Helen M. Dougherty 25 

Polly F. Brown 25 

David R. Brown 25 

Charles P. Kindleberger 25 

Manley Boyce 25 

William Langton 25 

Blanks 70 

PRESIIENTIAL PREFERENCE 

Stevenson 2A 

Kefauver 2 

McConnack 2 

Eisenhower 2 

Blanks 2 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
JUL! 23, 1956 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was called to order 
by the Town Clerk, William H. Davis, in the absence of the Moderator, 
Donald P. Donaldson, at 7:30 P. M. The return of the Warrant was 
read, and on motion duly seconded, Mr. Sumner Smith was elected 
Temporary Moderator. The following business was transacted: 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum 
of $3,000.00 to the Reserve Fund, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: That the sum of $3,000.00 be appropriated from free cash 
to the Reserve Fund for the use of the Finance Committee, in addition 
to the $10,000.00 appropriated thereto from Overlay Surplus at the 
1956 Annual Town Meeting, and that any unexpended balance in said 
Reserve Fund at the close of the fiscal year, up to and including 
the amount of this appropriation, be returned to Free Cash, and any 
additional unexpended balance thereof at said close of fiscal year 
shall be returned to Overlay Surplus. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum 
of $60,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of laying water mains 
in the vicinity of Brooks Road and Old Cambridge Turnpike, said mains 
to be not less than six inches in diameter, and determine whether the 
money shall be provided for by borrowing under authority of clause 
(5), section 8, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Voted: (unanimously) That the Town appropriate the sum of 
$60,000.00 for the purpose of laying water mains in the vicinity of 

33 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Brooks Road and the Old Cambridge Turnpike, said mains to be not 
less than six inches in diameter; and that the Treasurer be and here- 
by is authorized to borrow, with the approval of the Selectmen, the 
sum of $60,000.00, or such lesser amount as is necessary to complete 
this project, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to approve of a transfer 
of $3,000.00, appropriated under Article 5 of the Warrant of the 
Annual Town Meeting of March 21, 1956, under the Heading: "Selectmen . 
Salary of Administrative Assistant tt , to an Engineering Service 
Account, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town transfer $3,000.00, appropriated under 
Article 5 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of 1956 for 
"Salary of Administrative Assistant" to an Engineering Service 
account. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to approve a transfer 
of funds appropriated under Article 5 of the Warrant of the Annual 
Town Meeting of March 21, 1956, under the general heading of EDUCA- 
TION, as follows: 

From Maintenance to Operation $700.00 

From Auxiliary Agencies to Instruction $400.00 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town authorize that seven hundred dollars ($700) 
be transferred from Maintenance to Operation, and that four hundred 
dollars ($400) be transferred from Auxiliary Agencies to Instruction 
in the appropriations made for the School Department under Article 5 
of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of March, 1956, so that the 
new totals read as follows: 

Instruction $153 , 687 . 00 

Operation $ 23,890.00 

Maintenance $ 3,875.00 

Auxiliary Agencies $ 47,006.00 

The meeting was adjourned at 7:55 P. M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



34 



ELECTIONS 

STATE PRIMARY 
SEPTEMBER 18, 1956 

WARRANT 
Middlesex, ss. 

To either of the Constables in the Town of Lincoln 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to meet in Charles S. Smith School Tuesday, the eighteenth 
day of September, 1956, at twelve o'clock Noon for the following pur- 
poses: To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the nomina- 
tion of candidates of Political Parties for the following offices: 
Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, Auditor, Attorney 
General, all for the Commonwealth; Representative in Congress, 5th 
District; Councillor, 3rd District; Senator, 5th Senatorial District; 
Representative in General Court, 10th Middlesex District; County Com- 
missioners (2), Middlesex County; District Attorney, Northern Dis- 
trict. The polls will be open from 12 Noon to 7 P. M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereof at the time and place of said meeting. Given under our 
hands this thirteenth day of August, A. D. , 1956. 

C. K. Fitts ) Selectmen of 
William T. King ) Lincoln 

On the reverse of the Warrant is the following: 

August 29, 1956 

I have served this Warrant by posting attested copies at each of 
the Post Offices and at the Town House at least seven days before 
said meeting. Leo J. Algeo, Constable 

In accordance with the above Warrant the Polls were declared open 
at 12 Noon tjy Mr. William T. King. The return of the Warrant was 
read, and the following Ballot Clerks duly sworn: Helena A. Dee, 
Manley B. Boyce, Thomas J. Carney, Elizabeth J. Snelling, Henry J. 
Davis, and William 0. Causer. At 2:30 P. M. Mr. Elliott V. Grabill 
assumed the duties of Warden, and at U' 30 P. M. Mr. Charles K. Fitts 
took over the duties of Warden, and at 7 P. M. declared the Polls 
closed. Total number of ballots cast was 513, - Republican, 463; 
Democratic, 50; with the following results: 

REPUBLICAN 

Governor Sumner G. Whittier 445 

Blanks 18 

Lieutenant Governor Charles Gibbons 449 

Blanks 14 

35 





TOWN GOVERNMENT 




Secretary 


Richard I. Furbush 
Blanks 


441 

22 


Treasurer 


Robert H. Beaudreau 
Blanks 


443 
20 


Auditor 


Joseph A. Nobile 
Blanks 


445 
18 


Attorney General 


George Fingold 
Blanks 


449 
14 


Congressman, 5th 
District 


Edith Nourse Rogers 
Blanks 


429 
34 


Councillor, 3rd 

District 


Christian A. Herter, Jr. 
Harris A. Reynolds 
Blanks 


276 

185 

2 


Senator, 5th 
Middlesex District 


C. Chauncey Cousins 
William E. Hayes 
Blanks 


104 

330 

29 


Representative in 
General Court, 10th 
Middlesex District 


James DeNormandie 
Blanks 


430 
33 


County Commissioners 


William G. Andrew 
H. Herbert Applin 
George A. Ayotte 
Winston W. Bell 
Leo Blacker 
Thomas F. Geary, Jr. 
Frederick Lowe 
Blanks 


362 
294 
32 
54 
13 
36 
20 
115 


Sheriff, Middlesex 
County 


John Frederick Cahill 
Blanks 


429 
34 


District Attorney 


Edward J. Bushell 
Thomas F. Maher 
Ephraim Martin 
Blanks 


39 

8 

391 

25 



36 



EJECTIONS 



DEMOCRATIC 



Governor 



Lieutenant Governor 



Secretary 



Treasurer 



Auditor 



Attorney General 



Congressman, 5th 
District 

Councillor, 3rd 
District 



Senator, 5th 
Middlesex 



Representative in 
General Court, 10th 
Middlesex District 

County Commissioners 



Foster Furcolo 

Thomas H. Buckley 
Blanks 


U3 
5 
2 


Robert F. Murphy 
James A. Burke 
George A. Wells 
Blanks 


39 

1 

6 


Edward J. Cronin 
Robert Emmett Dinsmore 
Blanks 


39 

5 
6 


Clement A. Riley 
John F. Kennedy 
John F. Buckley 
Henry Joseph Hurley 
John M. Kennedy 
Blanks 


32 
9 
3 
1 

5 


Thomas J. Buckley 
Blanks 


A3 
7 


Joseph D. Ward 

Edward J. McCormack, Jr. 

Blanks 


3^ 
8 
6 


Scattering 
Blanks 


2 
48 


Peter James Coulouras 
Frederick M. Donovan 
Anthony Russo 
Blanks 


9 

18 
3 

20 


Charles F. Harrington 
Frederick B. Sweet, Jr. 
Blanks 


19 
17 
U 


Hector R. Buteau 
Blanks 


31 
19 


Edward M. App 
William P. Bennett 
C. Michael Bradley 


5 
2 

1 



37 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Edward J. Buckley 

John J. Burke 

John B. Carr 

John J. Carroll 

Joseph J. Corcoran 

Joseph Perry Costa 

Edward J. Coughlin 

Edward J. Crane 

James A. Cullen 

John J. Curran 

P. Joseph DeGuisto 

William F # Galgay 

Warren M. Griffin 

James E. Hagan 

Henry E. Keenan 

Francis R. King 

Francis G. Lyons 

Patrick Joseph McGlinchey 

William J. Moran 

William P. Murray 

Gerald J. Wayne 

Blanks 



U 

2 

2 

1 
U 

15 
7 

1 
7 

6 
2 
5 
1 

2 
3 

30 



Sheriff, Middlesex 
County 



Howard W, 
Blanks 



Fitzpatrick 



31 
19 



District Attorney, 

Northern District 



Vincent A. Burns 
John C. Carr, Jr. 
Joseph V. Carroll 
Thomas F. Casey 
Edward A. Counihan, 
John F. Cremens 
James L. O f Dea, Jr. 
Irving L, Stackpole 
John J. Tobin 
Andrew T. Trodden 
John F. Zamparelli 
Blanks 



Jr, 





2 
1 
U 
5 
32 

2 

3 
1 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



38 



ELECTIONS 



STATE ELECTION 
NOVEMBER 6, 1956 

WARRANT 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Middlesex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby requested to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in 
the State and National Election to meet in the Charles S. Smith 
School, Tuesday, the sixth day of November, 1956, to bring in their 
votes for the election of the following officers and questions: 
Presidential Electors; Governor; Lieutenant Governor; Secretary; 
Treasurer; Auditor; Attorney General; Representative in Congress, 5th 
District; Councillor, 3rd District; Senator, 5th District; Representa- 
tive in General Court, 10th Middlesex; County Commissioners (2); 
Sheriff; District Attorney, Northern District. 

Question No. 1 

A. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein 
of all alcoholic beverages (whiskey, rum, gin, malt beverages, wines, 
and all other alcoholic beverages)? 

B. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein 
of wines and malt beverages (wines, beer, ale, and all other malt 
beverages)? 

C. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein 
of all alcoholic beverages in packages, so-called, not to be drunk 
on the premises? 

The polls will be open from 7 A. M. to 8 P. M. Hereof fail not 
and make due return of this Warrant with your doings thereon at the 

time and place of said meeting. Given under our hands this 29th 
day of October, A. D. , 1956. 

C. K. Fitts ) Selectmen 

William T. King ) of 

Elliott V. Grabill ) Lincoln 

On the reverse of the Warrant is the following: 

Lincoln, Massachusetts, October 29, 1956 

I have served this Warrant by posting attested copies at each of 
the Post Offices and one at the Town House seven days before date of 
said Election. Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 

In accordance with the above Warrant the Polls were declared open 
at 7 A. M. by Mr. Elliott V. Grabill. Previously the ballot box 
was inspected and the following Ballot Clerks duly sworn: Elizabeth J. 
Snelling, Helena A. Dee, William 0. Causer, Manley B. Boyce, Margaret 
M. Algeo, D. Everett Sherman, Jr., Catherine M. Coan, Howard Snelling, 



39 



/ 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



George Gilbert, Rosina DuPont Anderson, Julia B # Taylor, Cecil Hall 
and E. Donlan Rooney. Mr. Charles K. Fitts and Mr. William T. 
King, together with Mr. Elliott V. Grabill, assumed the duties of 
Warden throughout the day. The total number of votes cast was 
1755, with the result as follows: 

Electors of Fresident and Vice President 



Eisenhower and Nixon, Republican 
Hass and Cozzini, Socialist -Labor 
Holtwick and Cooper, Prohibition 
Stevenson and Kefauver, Democratic 
Scattering 
Blanks 



1,393 

1 



339 

2 

20 



Governor 



Foster Furcolo of Longmeadow 
Sumner G. Whittier of Everett 
Henning A. Blomen of Somerville 
Mark R. Shaw of Melrose 
Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 
Socialist -Labor 
Prohibition 



402 

1,334 

5 

1 

13 



Lieutenant Governor 



Charles F. Gibbons of Stoneham 
Robert F. Murphy of Maiden 
Harold E. Bassett of Clinton 
Francis A. Votano of Lynn 
Blanks 



Republican 
Democratic 
Prohibition 
Socialist-Labor 



1,367 

356 

2 

3 

27 



Secretary 



Edward J. Cronin of Peabody 
Richard I. Furbush of Waltham 
Earl F. Dodge of Boston 
Lawrence Gilfedder of Boston 
Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 
Prohibition 
Socialist -labor 



301 

1,416 

1 

3 

34 



Treasurer 



John F. Kennedy of Canton 

Robert H. Beaudreau of Marlborough 

Isaac Goddard of Newton 

Willy N. Hogseth of Saugus 

Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 
Prohibition 
Socialist-labor 



303 

1,402 

5 

7 

38 



40 



ELECTIONS 




Auditor 




Thomas J. Buckley of Boston Democratic 
Joseph A. Nobile of Boston Republican 
John B. Lauder of Revere Prohibition 
Anthony Martin of Boston Socialist -Labor 
Blanks 


1,297 
3 

5 
36 


Attorney General 




George Fingold of Concord Republican 
Edward J. McCormack, Jr. of Boston Democratic 
Fred M. Ingersoll of Lynn Socialist-labor 
Howard B. Rand of Haverhill Prohibition 
Blanks 


1,393 

326 

4 

2 

30 


Congressman, Fifth District 




Edith Nourse Rogers of Lowell Republican 
Lawrence E. Corcoran of Arlington Democratic 
Scattering 
Blanks 


1,430 

261 

1 

63 


Councillor, Third District 




Frederick M. Donovan of Boston Democratic 
Christian A. Herter, Jr. of Boston Republican 
Blanks 


293 

1,433 

29 


Senator, Fifth Middlesex 




Charles F. J. Harrington of Watertown Democratic 
William E. Hayes of Waltham Republican 
Blanks 


295 

1,411 

49 


Representative in General Court, Tenth Middlesex District 


James DeNormandie of Lincoln Republican 
Hector R. Buteau of Hudson Democratic 
Blanks 


1,503 

216 

36 


County Commissioners, Middlesex County 




William J. Andrew of Cambridge Republican 
H. Herbert Applin of Watertown Republican 
Edward J. Buckley of Somerville Democratic 
Patrick Joseph McGlinchey of Lowell Democratic 
Blanks 


1,361 

1,291 

292 

211 

355 



a 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 









Sheriff 






Howard W. F it zpa trick of Maiden 
John Frederick Cahill of Belmont 
Blanks 


Democratic 
Republican 




352 

1,3U 

62 


District 


Attorney , 


Northern District (To fill 


vacancy) 




Ephraim 1 
James L. 
Blanks 


yiartin 

O'Dea 


of Belmont 
, Jr. of Lowell 


Republican 
Democratic 




1,390 

521 

44 








Question No. 1 






Yes 

No 
Blanks 








B 
C 




258 

1,313 

184 


Yes 

No 

Blanks 










294 

1,250 

211 


Yes 

No 

Blanks 










469 

1,128 

158 



The Polls were declared closed at 8 o'clock P. M. by Mr. Charles 
K. Fitts, who, with the assistance of Mr. Elliott V. Grabill, pro- 
ceeded to check and deposit the Absentee Ballots. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
DECEMBER 18, 1956 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was called to order 
by the Moderator, Mr. Donald P. Donaldson. The return of the War- 
rant was read. On introduction by the Moderator, the Reverend 
Morris R. Robinson offered an invocation to the Deity. The follow- 
ing business was transacted: 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to increase the Highway 
Budget by appropriating $250.00 to the General Expense account, 
$1,500.00 to the Snow Removal account, and $4,500.00 to the Equipment 
Maintenance and Supplies account, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 



42 



TOWN MEETINGS 



Voted: (unanimously) That the Town increase the Highway De- 
partment budget by raising and appropriating the following amounts: 
$250.00 to the General Expense account; $1,500.00 to the Snow Re- 
moval account; and $4,500.00 to the Equipment Maintenance and 
Supplies account, for a total of $6,250.00. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum 
of one hundred dollars ($100.00) to be given to the Lincoln Post 
#84 j American Legion, for the purchase of a U. S. flag and a Post 
flag to replace those now in use, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: To pass over the article by mutual consent. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public 
way the private road known as Pine Ridge Road, as shown on a plan 
prepared by Hilton and Snelling, dated October 11, 1954, recorded 
with South Middlesex Registry of Deeds at the end of Book 8378, 
approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln July 12, 1956, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That subject to the receipt of a deed under easement 
satisfactory to the Selectmen the Town accept as a public way the 
private road now known as Pine Ridge Road and approved by the 
Lincoln Planning Board on July 12, 1956. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to approve a transfer 
of funds appropriated under Article 5 of the Warrant of the Annual 
Town Meeting of March 21, 1956, under the heading: Water Department, 
Meters, Operating Expenses and Miscellaneous, to the Supplies, 
Maintenance and Rental account of the Water Department, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town authorize the transfer of $2,000.00 from 
the Meters, Operating Expense and Miscellaneous account to the 
Supplies, Maintenance and Rental account in the appropriation made 
for the Water Department under Article 5 of the Warrant for the 
Annual Town Meeting of March, 1956. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen in the name and on behalf of the Town to acquire in fee 
by eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, as a site for a fire 
station or combined police and fire station, the whole or any part 
of a certain parcel of land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, now or for- 
merly of Dorothy S. F. M. Codman, Roger B. Tyler and Benjamin J. 
Fawcett, as they are Trustees under will of Ogden Codman, located 
on the westerly corner of the intersection of Lincoln and Codman 
Roads, containing 58,903 square feet more or less, and bounded and 
described as follows: 

Beginning at an iron pin on the northwesterly side of said 
Lincoln Road; thence running along said Lincoln Road S. 56°50 f 00 rt W. 
one hundred and eighty feet (180 1 ) to a corner at remaining land of 

43 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



said Dorothy S. F. M. Codman et al, as such Trustees; thence turning 
and running by said remaining land N. 33°08 f 00" W. two hundred thirty- 
eight and sixty -nine (238.69) feet to a corner at remaining land of 
Dorothy S. F. M. Codman et al, as such Trustees; thence turning and 
running by said remaining land N. 54 13 , 10 tt E. two hundred forty and 
four hundredths (240. 04) feet to said Codman Road; thence turning and 
running along said Codman Road by two courses S. 5°46 f 50 rt E. one hun- 
dred and forty-two and sixty -four hundredths (142.64.) feet and S. 35° 
53 f 25 M E. thirty-seven and thirty-six hundredths (37.36) feet to a 
stone bound; thence turning and running along a curve with a radius 
of sixty-eight and nineteen hundredths (68.19) feet southerly and 
southwesterly one hundred eight and ninety hundredths (108.90) feet 
to the iron pin at the point of beginning; raise and appropriate a 
sum of money therefor; or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Selectmen be and they hereby are authorized and 
empowered in the name and on behalf of the Town to acquire in fee 
by eminent domain, purchase or any other way, as a site for a combined 
police and fire station a certain parcel of land in Lincoln, Massa- 
chusetts, now or formerly of Dorothy S. F. M. Codman, Roger B. Tyler, 
and Benjamin I. Fawcett, as they are Trustees under the will of Ogden 
Codman, located on the westerly corner of the intersection of Lincoln 
and Codman Roads, containing 58,903 square feet more or less, and 
bounded and described substantially as follows: 

Beginning at an iron pin on the northwesterly side of said Lincoln 
Road; thence running along said Lincoln Road S. 56° $2 f 00" W. one 
hundred eighty (180) feet to a corner at remaining land of said 
Dorothy S. F. M. Codman et al, as Trustees; thence turning and running 
by said remaining land N. 33 o 08 f 00 H W. two hundred thirty -eight and 
sixty-nine hundredths (238.69) feet to a corner at remaining land of 
Dorothy S. F. M. Codman et al, as such Trustees; thence turning and 
running by said remaining land N. S^^'IO" E. two hundred forty and 
four hundredths (240.04) feet to said Codman Road; thence turning and 
running along said Codman Road by two courses S. 35°46 , 50 B E. one 
hundred forty-two and sixty -four hundredths (142.64) feet and S. 35° 
53 ! 25 n E. thirty-seven and thirty-six hundredths (37.36) feet to a 
point formerly marked by a bound; thence turning and running along a 
curve with a radius of sixty -eight and nineteen hundredths (68.19) 
feet southerly and southwesterly one hundred eight and ninety hun- 
dredths (108.90) feet to the iron pin at the point of beginning; and 
that there be and there is hereby appropriated from available funds 
in the treasury the sum of Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($3,500) 
for such purposes. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to continue the Committee 
appointed by the Moderator pursuant to the vote of the Town under 
Article 24 of the Annual Town Meeting on March 21, 1956; to empower 
said Committee to enter into contracts and to do or cause to be done 
all things necessary or desirable to prepare plans for a fire station 
or combined police and fire station to be erected on land of the Town 

44 



TOWN MEETINGS 



now owned or to be hereafter acquired for the purpose; to authorize 
•aid Committee to use for such purposes the sum of Five Thousand 
Dollars ($5,000) appropriated for its use by said vote of the Town 
under said Article 24; to authorize the Moderator to fill any vacancy 
which may occur on said Committee; or take any action relative thereto, 

Voted: That the Committee appointed by the Moderator pursuant to 
the vote of the Town under Article 24 at the Annual Meeting on March 
21, 1956, is hereby continued; that said Committee is hereby author- 
ized and empowered to enter into contracts and to do or cause to be 
done all things necessary or desirable to prepare plans for a com- 
bined police and fire station to be erected on land to be acquired by 
the Town for the purpose as provided in Article 5 of the Warrant for 
this Meeting; that said Committee is hereby authorized to use for 
such purposes the sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000) appropriated 
for its use by said vote of the Town under said Article 24; and that 
the Moderator is hereby authorized to fill any vacancy which may 
occur on said Committee. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to acquire in fee for 
school purposes by eminent domain, purchase or any other way, a cer- 
tain parcel of land now or formerly of Jennie V, McClellan and for- 
merly of Sumner Smith, located on the northwesterly side of Lincoln 
Road between land now of Newton and land now of Cousins, containing 
10.7 acres more or less, raise and appropriate a sum of money there- 
for, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted; That the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized and 
directed to acquire in the name and on behalf of the Town within 
sixty (60) days, or as near thereto as reasonably practicable, in fee 
for school purposes, by purchase, eminent domain or in any other way, 
a certain parcel of land in Lincoln on the westerly side of Lincoln 
Road between land now or formerly of Newton and land now or formerly 
of Cousins, shown on a plan entitled: "Plan of land in Lincoln, Mass. 11 , 
dated October 22, 1956, Barnes Engineering Company, to be recorded 
with Middlesex South Registry of Deeds, a copy of which plan is on 
file in the Town Clerk's office, and being more particularly bounded 
and described according to said plan, as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the northwesterly side line of Lincoln 
Road at land now or formerly of Harold S. Cousins, as shown on said 
plan; thence running N. 59^4 f 50 n W. by said land now or formerly of 
Harold S. Cousins, 18.18 feet more or less to a point, as shown on 
said plan; thence turning and running N. 58°52 f 50 w W. by said land 
now or formerly of Harold S. Cousins, by two lines 142.72 feet more 
or less, and 12 feet more or less, respectively, to a brook at land 
now of the Town of Lincoln, as shown on said plan; thence turning and 
running in a northerly direction by said brook and said land of the 
Town of Lincoln 523 feet more or less to a point as shown on said 
plan; thence turning and running westerly and northerly again by said 
brook and said land of the Town of Lincoln 170 feet, more or less, to 
a point as shown on said plan; thence turning and running N. 69 33 f 10 B 

45 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



E. by land now or formerly of Sumner Smith 298.53 feet, more or less, 
to a point as shown on said plan; thence turning and running N. 84° 
18 f 8" E. by said land now or formerly of Sumner Smith 170.32 feet, 
more or less, to a brook as shown on said plan; thence running in an 
easterly direction by said brook and said land now or formerly of 
Sumner Smith 152 feet, more or less, to a point in said brook at 
land now or formerly of Rouner as shown on said plan; thence turning 
and running S. 45 22 f 58 !l E. by said land now or formerly of Rouner 
246 feet, more or less, to a point in a stone wall at land now or 
formerly of Newton as shown on said plan; thence turning and running 
S 68°35 f 45 w W. by said land now or formerly of Newton 111.55 feet, 
more or less, to a point as shown on said plan; thence turning and 
running S. 65 o 26 f 50 n W. by said land now or formerly of Newton 182.36 
feet, more or less, to a point as shown on said plan; thence turning 
and running S. 30°36 f 29 w E. by said land of Newton 23.21 feet more 
or less to a point as shown on said plan; thence turning and running 
S. 26°09 l 10 fl E. by said land now or formerly of Newton 90.75 feet, 
more or less, to a drill hole, as shown on said plan; thence running 
S. 27°58 t 40 f! E. ty said land now or formerly of Newton 35.15 feet, 
more or less, to a drill hole as shown on said plan; thence turning 
and running S. 30°14 l 40 lf E. by said land now or formerly of Newton 
80.69 feet, more or less, to a drill hole, as shown on said plan; 
thence turning and running S. 33°18 f 30 B E. by said land now or former- 
ly of Newton 249.64. feet, more or less, to the side line of Lincoln 
Road as shown on said plan; thence turning and running N. 88 14 f 39 n W. 
by the side line of said Lincoln Road 115.34 feet, more or less, to a 
point as shown on said plan; thence turning and running westerly and 
southwesterly by the side line of said Lincoln Road in a curve with 
a radius of 332.54 feet, more or less, 350.75 feet, more or less, to 
a point in said side line of Lincoln Road as shown on said plan; 
thence turning and running S. 31°19 f 21 n W. by said side line of Lin- 
coln Road 85.99 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, as 
shown on said plan; and containing, according to said plan, 10.7 
acres, more or less, or however said premises may be bounded, measured 
and described; all of the described premises are supposed to be owned 
by Jennie V. McClellan, and formerly owned by Sumner Smith; and there 
be and there is hereby appropriated from available funds in the 
Treasury for such purposes the sum of $25,000.00. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to acquire in fee for 
school purposes by eminent domain, purchase or any other way, a cer- 
tain parcel of land now or formerly of Perry J. and Kate S. Culver, 
located on the westerly side of land now of the Town of Lincoln, being 
the site of the present Charles Sumner Smith School, and on the east- 
erly side of other land now or formerly of said Perry J. and Kate S. 
Culver, containing 2.523 acres, more or less; raise and appropriate 
a sum of money therefor, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be and they are hereby authorized and 
directed to acquire in the name and on behalf of the Town within 

46 



TOWN MEETINGS 



sixty days, or as near thereto as reasonably practicable, in fee for 
school purposes, by purchase, eminent domain or in any other way, a 
certain parcel of land in Lincoln on the westerly side of land now 
owned by the Town of Lincoln, being the site of the present Charles 
Sumner Smith School, shown on a plan entitled "Plan of land in 
Lincoln, Mass. n , dated Nov. 14, 1956, Barnes Engineering Company, Inc., 
Registered Civil Engineers and land Surveyors, to be recorded with 
Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, a copy of which plan is 
on file in the Town Clerk's office, and being more particularly 
bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a concrete bound at the point of intersection of land 
now of the Town of Lincoln, land now or formerly of Conant, and the 
parcel of land herein described; thence running N. 46°30 f 27" W. , by 
said land now or formerly of Conant, 169.86 feet, more or less, to a 
point at land now or formerly of Perry J. and Kate S. Culver, as 
shown on said plan; thence turning and running S. 21 21 f 40" W. , by 
said land now or formerly of Perry J. and Kate S. Culver, 420 feet, 
more or less, to a point as shown on said plan; thence turning and 
running S. 33 01*35" E., by said land of Perry J. and Kate S. Culver, 
398.07 feet, more or less, to a point at land now of the Town of 
Lincoln, as shown by said plan; thence turning and running N. 2°46' 
50" E., by said land now of the Town of Lincoln, 238.60 feet, more or 
less, to a concrete bound as shown on said plan; thence turning and 
running N. 12d21»49" E., by said land of the Town of Lincoln, 278.63 
feet, more or J.ess, to a concrete bound, as shown on said plan; thence 
turning and running N. 7°00 f 17" W. , by said land now of the Town of 
Lincoln, 98.24 feet, more or less, to the concrete bound at the point 
of beginning, as shown on the said plan; and containing, according to 
said plan, 2.523 acres, or however said premises may be bounded, 
measured and described, all of the described premises are supposed to 
be owned by Perry J. and Kate S. Culver; and that there be and there 
is hereby appropriated from available funds in the Treasury for said 
purposes the sum of $4,500.00. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to continue the Com- 
mittee appointed by the Moderator in accordance with the vote of the 
Town under Article 25 at the Adjourned Town Meeting held on March 21, 
1956, to authorize and empower such Committee to enter into contracts, 
and to do or cause to be done all things necessary or desirable to 
prepare plans for the construction of a new elementary school or an 
addition to an existing elementary school on land now owned or to be 
acquired by the Town for such purposes, to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for such purposes of said Committee, and if a vacancy 
shall occur on said Committee, to authorize the Moderator to fill 
such vacancy or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the. Committee appointed by the Moderator in accordance 
with the vote of the Town under Article 25 at the Adjourned Annual 
Meeting held on March 21, 1956, be and the same is hereby continued, 
that the said Committee is authorized to enter into contracts and to 

47 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



do all things necessary or desirable to. prepare or cause to be pre- 
pared plans for the construction of a new elementary school on land 
which the Selectmen are authorized to acquire for the Town of Lincoln 
pursuant to the vote under Article 7 of this meeting, that there be 
and there is hereby raised and appropriated for such purposes of 
said Committee the sum of $5,000; and that the Moderator is hereby 
authorized to fill any vacancy which may occur on said Committee. 

Meeting adjourned at 8:45 P. M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



LICENSES 

Total number of Dog Licenses issued during the year 1956: 513, 
namely: 271, Male; 68, Female; 167, Spayed Female; and 7, Kennel; 
for which the sum of $1,213.40 has been paid to the Town Treasurer. 

Sporting issued during the year 1956: Fishing, 122; Hunting, 17; 
Sporting, 33; Minor Fishing, 2; Female Fishing, 18; Non-resident 
Special Fishing, 3; Non-resident Hunting, 1; for which the sum of 
$667.50 has been paid to the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



48 



& 



inance 



REPORT OF THE STATE AND TOWN AUDITORS 



The work of the State Auditor in 1956 consisted, as usual, of a 
thorough check of the Town's financial records for the preceding 
year, 1955, and the preparation of a statement of the Town f s finan- 
cial condition at the beginning of the year 1956. 

The statutes provide that the "substance" of the State Auditor ! s 
report be published. In the Town Auditor's opinion, this substance 
is contained in the balance sheet of the Town prepared by the State 
Auditor, showing the condition of the Town as of December 31, 1955. 
A summarization of this Balance Sheet is published below. 

The full Auditor's report is on file with the Town Clerk, and is 
available for the examination of any interested citizens of the 
Town. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Louis C. Farley, Jr. 

Town Auditor 



A9 



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50 



TREASURER 



TREASURER'S REPORT, CALENDAR YEAR 1956 



January 1, Balance $ 184,164.02 

RECEIPTS 

Board of Appeals 115.00 

Board of Health: 

Licenses 31.50 

Nurse 224.75 

Garbage collections 4,276.63 

Anti-Rabies Dog Clinic 99.00 

Borrowed in anticipation of taxes 125,000.00 

Cemetery, digging graves . . . 765.00 

City of Cambridge, taxes, 1955-1956 1,817.87 

Collector of Taxes 437,232.03 

Interest & Costs 745.34 

Concord Court Fines . 139.94 

DeCordova School Equipment Fund .... 698.78 

DeCordova, for State Audit 1954-1955-1956 450.00 

Inspectors, Building, Plumbing and Wiring 932.50 

Insurance, claims and refunds 364.60 

Interest on deposits 3,078.31 

Library Fines 423.50 

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of 

Income Tax I 32,971.25 

Corporation Tax 18,476.50 

Highways, for snow removal 916.50 

Chapter 90 10,417.69 

0. A. A 13,819.91 

A. D. C 397.18 

Meals Tax 846.84 

Hurricane & Flood Damage 33,025.34 

School Aid 13,800.00 

School Construction 17,927.94 

Tuition & Transportation 24,232.56 

Vocational Education 1,968.07 

Civil Defense 1,815.02 

Loss of Taxes ..... 615.06 171,229.86 

Miscellaneous Licenses, etc 63.30 

Middlesex County 

Chapter 90, 1955 1,478.97 

Dog Tax 879.52 

Care & Killing of Dogs 84.50 

Chapter 90 Construction, 1956 4,469.37 6,912.36 

Old Age Assistance 

Refund from other Towns 606.67 

Collections 460.70 

Schools 

Grammar School Fund 37.89 

Rentals 425.00 

Miscellaneous receipts 311.07 

Town of Sudbury for school nurse 266.92 



51 



FINANCE 



Town Clerk for dog licenses $ 1,213.40 

Town Hall rental -40.00 

U. S. Govt, for 0. A. A $ 10,171.52 

For A. D. C 529.65 

For 0. A. A. Administration . 581.21 

For A. D. C. Administration . 186.13 11,468.51 

PAYMENTS 

Selectmen's orders (See detail) $ 744,093.48 

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of: 

State Parks & Reservations 865.13 

Auditing Municipal Accounts 808.96 

Middlesex County: 

1956 Tax 13,999.13 

Dog Licenses 1,212.20 

Tuberculosis Hospital 3,740.95 

$ 764,719.85 
Balance in Banks, December 31, 1956 188 .874.60 



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52 



TREASURER 



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TREASURER 

GENERAL FUND, DECEMBER 31, 1956 

Assets 

Harvard Trust Company $ 87,260.46 

Day Trust Company 2,952.15 

First National Bank of Boston 708.82 

Belmont Savings Bank 4,710.63 

Beverly Savings Bank 4,990.49 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 4,642.44 

Brockton Savings Bank 5,141.13 

Brookline Savings Bank .... 2,589.90 

Cambridge Savings Bank 5,496.22 

Charlestown Savings Bank 5,755.14 

Franklin Savings Bank 5,270.34 

Home Savings Bank 5,237.87 

Institution for Savings in Roxbury 5, 166. 81 

Lowell Institution for Savings 2,495.40 

Lynn Five Cents Savings Bank 5,188.12 

Maiden Savings Bank 2,572.48 

Natick Five Cents Savings Bank 3,456.36 

Newton Savings Bank 5,244.45 

North Avenue Savings Bank 2,679.92 

Provident Institution for Savings 5,255.40 

Waltham Savings Bank 3,152.72 

Warren Institution for Savings 7,549.87 

Whitman Savings Bank .* 5,357.48 

Concord Cooperative Bank 6,000.00 



$188,874.60 



Accounts Receivable: 

Taxes, interest to be added $14,540.47 

Middlesex County, Ch. 90 Maint 1,500.00 

Middlesex County, Ch. 90 Const 1,780.63 

Comm. of Mass., Ch. 90 Maint 1,500.00 

Comm. of Mass. , Ch. 90 Const 3,561.28 

Comm. of Mass., 0. A. A 1,771.89 

Other Towns, 0. A. A 46.30 

County Tax underestimate 595.89 

Tuberculosis Hospital underestimate . . 632.63 

State Parks & Reservations underestimate 358.78 26 , 287. 87 

Total Assets $215,162.47 



Liabilities & Surplus 

Dog Licenses, due County $ 37.20 

Road Machinery Fund 2, 610.06 



61 



FINANCE 



Federal grants for Public Welfare 

Old Age Assistance $ 1,722.53 

Old Age Assistance Administration 193.15 

Aid to Dependent Children 361.58 

Aid to Dependent Children Administration 114. 59 

Disability Assistance 400.78 

Disability Assistance Administration 10.85 

Old Age Assistance Recovery 1,123.00 

Grammar School Fund Income 37.89 

DeCordova School Equipment Fund Income 698.78 

Unexpended appropriation balances: 

Police car $ 320.44 

Fire Station Plans 4,972.75 

land for Fire Station 3,500.00 

Civil Defense 721.79 

Ch. 90 Construction 3,144.14 

Virginia Road 1,043.37 

School Add«n. #2 1,324.77 

School Land 29,500.00 

School Building Comnittee 4,111.50 

Library Committee 2,836.50 

Cemetery Permanent Imp 107.57 

Bedford Airport Committee 300.09 

Preservation of Town Records .... 150.00 

Capital Improvements Committee . . . 460.80 

Acquisition of Public lands 

Committee 342.97 

Honor Roll 960.00 

Department of Public Works 

Committee 100.00 53,896.69 

Overlay Reserves, 1955 2,015.43 

1956 5,263.29 7,278.72 

Overlay Surplus 15,934.97 

General Funds Surplus: 

Receivables reserved until 

collected 17,945.96 

Available Surplus (Free Cash) . . . . 112,795.72 130,741.68 

Total Reserves and Surplus $215,162.47 



62 



TREASURER 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 



$120,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4$, due $10,000 each December 1, 
1957 - 1968, issued under Chapter 208, Acts of 1948. 

50,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4$, due $5,000 each December 1 

1957 - 1958, and $4,000 each December 1, 1959 - 1968, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended. 

8,000 Highway Equipment Building Loan, 1 3/4$, due $4-, 000 each 
December 1, 1957 - 1958, issued under Chapter 44-, General 
Laws, as amended. 

185,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4$, due $13,000 each December 1, 

1957 - 1961, and $12,000 each December 1, 1962 - 1971, issued 
under Chapter 356, Acts of 1951. 

60,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4$, due $4,000 each December 1, 

1957 - 1971, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended, 

500 Water Main Loan, 2 3/4$, due November 1, 1957, issued under 
Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended. 

50,000 Water Main Loan, 2.70$, due $5,000 each October 1, 1957 - 
1966, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended. 



$473,500 



SCHOOL MILK FUND 

Balance, January 1, 1956 $ 493.89 

Receipts 2,891.53 

$3,385.42 



Payments $3,143.87 

December 31, 1956, Balance on Deposit 241.55 

$3,385.42 



63 



FINANCE 



WATER DEPARTMENT REPORT 

January 1, 1956, Balance $16,645.96 

Receipts 

Meters $33,236.53 

Rent of Hydrants 3,495.00 

Water connections, etc 5,798.89 

Miscellaneous receipts 432.50 

Premium and accrued interest on loan . . . 122. 19 43*085.11 

$59,731.07 

Expenses 

Salaries and Wages $ 9,456.40 

Supplies and Maintenance 11,906.62 

Meters and Operating Expense 6,840.79 

Bonds and Interest 3,096.25 31,300.06 

December 31, balance on deposit 28 t 431. 01 

$59,731.07 

New Water Main Extension 

Water Loan f of 1956, 2.7C# due 1957-66 $50,000.00 

Expended in 1956 46,708.86 

December 31, Balance on Deposit $ 3,291.14 

CEMETERY INVESTMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Sale of cemetery lots in 1956 $ 760.00 

Interest on savings bank account 321.65 

$ 1,081.65 

Safe deposit box rent ......... $ 3.00 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 321.65 

Deposited in Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 757.00 $ 1,081.65 

Middlesex Institution for Savings $11,673.95 



64 



TREASURER 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 



Funds deposited in 
Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 

Samuel Hartwell 
Orila J. Flint 
Annie A. Ray 
Maria L. Thompson 
John H. Pierce 
George F. Harrington 
Francis Flint 
Wm. W. Benjamin 
Abijah Jones 
Ellen F. Whitney 
E. H. Rogers 
Ellen T . Trask 
Thos. Huddleston 
Joa Pacewicz 
Mary Susan Rice 
Julia A, Bemis 
Donald Gordon 
Elizabeth G. Chapin 
Sarah J. Browning 
Agnes L. Brown 
Lewis W. Woodworth 
Robert B. Chapin 
Gardner Moore 
Mary James Scripture 
Chas. P. Farnsworth 
Helen 0. Storrow 
Elizabeth S. Wheeler 
L. B. & A. E. Thiessen 
Paul Dorian 
Raymond E. Hagerty 
Charles 0. Preble 
George G. Tar bell 
Eugene Sherman 
Mildred E. Bowles 
Mabel H. Todd 
John J. Kelliher 





Income accu- 


1955 Care 








mulated 


paid in 


1956 


Dec. 31 


Principal 


before 1956 
$ 51.25 


1956 
$ 8.50 


Income 
$ 10.34 1 


Balance 


$ 300.00 


I 353.09 


300.00 


42.31 


8.50 


10.07 


343.88 


300.00 


117.69 


8.50 


12.37 


421.56 


500.00 


152.94 


8.50 


19.47 


663.91 


500.00 


51.63 


8.50 


16.42 


559.55 


100.00 


14.49 


- 


3.45 


117.94 


250.00 


118.95 


8.50 


10.88 


371.33 


500.00 


205.69 


8.50 


21.07 


718.26 


300.00 


37.81 


10.00 


9.89 


337.70 


100.00 


12.92 


_ 


3.39 


116.31 


250.00 


36.04 


8.50 


8.38 


285.92 


200.00 


87.15 


2.75 


8.58 


292.98 


200.00 


23.40 


4.25 


6.62 


225.77 


400.00 


32.85 


10.00 


12.77 


435.62 


87.27 


21.62 


_ 


3.27 


112.16 


300.00 


29.92 


9.17 


9.68 


330.43 


300.00 


163.00 


9.17 


13.70 


467.53 


300.00 


94.95 


8.50 


11.67 


398.12 


200.00 


26.54 


6.75 


6.64 


226.43 


300.00 


48.93 


4.25 


10.40 


355.08 


150.00 


16.41 


_ 


5.01 


171.42 


300.00 


41.67 


8.50 


10.07 


343.24 


300.00 


39.01 


8.50 


9.98 


340.49 


500.00 


63.68 


10.50 


16.72 


569.90 


350.00 


46.21 


10.50 


11.65 


397.36 


2,000.00 


272.69 


15.00 


68.23 


2,325.92 


200.00 


28.36 


_ 


6.89 


235.25 


500.00 


73.80 


- 


17.33 


591.13 


150.00 


19.64 


_ 


5.12 


174.76 


150.00 


19.64 


_ 


5.12 


174.76 


100.00 


11.21 


_ 


3.35 


114.56 


400.00 


30.39 


10.00 


12.69 


433.08 


200.00 


4.77 


_ 


6.17 


210.94 


200.00 


1.63 


_ 


6.08 


207.71 


200.00 


_ 


_ 


5.53 


205.53 


200.00 


- 


- 


4.02 


204.02 



Funds deposited in 
Suffolk Savings Bank 

J. Waldo Smith 
Charles S. Smith 
Edward R. Farrar 
Anne D. Pollard 



300.00 
300.00 
300.00 
300.00 



43.89 
47.94 
32.13 

31.80 



8.50 
8.50 
8.50 
8.50 



10.13 

10.25 

9.77 

9.77 



345.52 
349.69 
333.40 
333.07 



$12,787.27 $2,194.95 $229.84 $442.94 $15,195.32 
Frederick B. Taylor, Town Treasurer 



65 



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66 



ASSESSORS 

ASSESSORS 1 REPORT 

The Board of Assessors submits the following report for the year 1956: 

According to law, all real estate and personal property tax abatement re- 
quests must be filed with the Board by October 1st of the year in question. 

All automobile excise tax abatement requests must be filed with the Board 
within six months of the date of issuance of the notice of assessment or of 
the date of the sale or transfer of the vehicle, but in any event not later 
than January 31st of the succeeding year. 

1956 Recapitulation 

Total appropriations to be raised by taxation ........ $555,13.8.99 

Appropriations to be taken from available funds 80,413.62 

Flood Control 28,100.00 

State tax and assessments. 

State Audit 808.96 

State Parks & Reservations .... 506.35 1,315.31 

County Tax and assessments. 

County tax 13,403.24 

T. B. Hospital assessment 3,108.32 

Underestimates for 1955 2,096.05 18, 607.61 

Overlay of Current Year 10,034.49 

Gross amount to be raised 693,590.02 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds. 

Income tax ..... 33,500.66 

Corporation tax 16,445. 60 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise . 52,500.00 

Old Age Assistance 15,000.00 

Schools 19,000.00 

Water Department 42,052.50 

Interest on Taxes and 

Assessments 3,000.00 

State Assistance for School 

Construction 10,516.91 

Flood Control reimbursement . . . 27,290.00 

All others 7,986.81 

$2 27,292.48 

Overestimates of previous year. 

State Parks & Reservations 73.35 

Gypsy & Brown Tail Moth 110.9 1 

$" 184. 26 



App. voted from Available Funds 80,413.62 



Total Estimated Receipts & Available Funds 307,890.36 

Net amount to be raised by taxation on polls and property . . 385,699.66 

$693,590.02 



67 



ASSESSORS 



Number of polls 949 at $2.00 $1,898.00 

Total valuation: 

Personal property $505,300 at $58.00 29,307.40 

Real Estate $6,111,970 at $58.00 _354,A9A.26 $385,699.66 

Number of Acres of land Assessed 8,937 

Number of Dwelling Houses Assessed 912 

Tax Rate per $1,000.00 $58.00 



Respectfully submitted: 

Frederick H. Greene, Jr., Chairman 
Arthur W. Rice, Jr. 
Elmer H. Ziegler 



68 



Protection of 
lersons and Property 

REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I hereby submit my report for the Police Department for the year 
ending December 31, 1956. 

Arrests by Lincoln Police 81 

Arrests by State Police 49 

Total number of arrests 130 

Arrests were made for the following offenses: 

Crimes against the person: 

Abduction 2 

Assault . . . 1 

Manslaughter . . 1 

Crimes against property: 

Fraud 2 

Larceny 8 

Using motor vehicle without authority 2 

Wanton destruction of property 3 

Crimes against public order: 

Default 2 

Delinquency 15 

Disposal of refuse on highway 1 

Driving a motor vehicle to endanger life ... 15 

Driving a motor vehicle while intoxicated . . 12 

Drunkenness 14- 

Escape, other than prison 6 

Giving false name to police officer 3 

Improper loading of truck 1 

Leaving scene after causing personal or 

property injury 3 

Motor vehicle laws, violating 33 

Non-payment wages 1 

Setting fire without a permit 3 

Vagrant 1 

Violation of probation 1 

Violations of motor vehicle law reported to Registry of Motor 

Vehicles 48 



69 



PROTECTION 



Warning notices issued for violation of motor vehicle 
law 53 

Motor vehicle accident report: 

Accidents reported 128 

Occupants injured 120 

Occupants killed 2 

Pedestrians injured 2 

The Police Department business increased considerably during the 
past year. It is with this fact in mind and the anticipation of a 
continued increase in activities that I recommend the addition of 
another permanent officer to the department. I also recommend the 
appointment of a sergeant in the department to assume the responsi- 
bility of administration in the absence of the Chief. 

During the past year members of the department attended Red Cross 
standard first aid courses and Chief Algeo and Patrolman Maclnnis 
attended advanced and instructors courses. Members of the department 
attended classes at the Veterans 1 Administration Hospital in Bedford 
on the handling of mental patients. Patrolman Maclnnis attended 
the small arms training school at Camp Curtis Guild, Wakefield, Mass., 
conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and is currently 
attending a fingerprinting course at Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology conducted by the Massachusetts State Police. 

The department has joined the New England Police Revolver League 
and both regular and special officers are participating in this 
program. 

The operators of the switchboard and police radio at the Town 
Hall have continued to serve the department well and I wish to thank 
them for their cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Leo J. Algeo 

Chief of Police 



70 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT REPORT 



The Board organized electing A. J. Dougherty Chief and William 
Dean Clerk. The Department answered 125 alarms during the year as 
listed below: 

Grass fires 52 

House & Accessories 16 

Cars and Accidents 18 

Lost Persons 2 

Miscellaneous 37 

Mutual Aid to Concord 2 

Mutual Aid to Wayland 1 

Total estimated property loss reported to the Fire Department 
amounted to $5,350.00. 

We are recommending the replacement of Engine 33 which has been in 
use since 1936, and, although the pump on this truck still works, 
further repairs, if needed, would be impossible due to age. It is 
our feeling the truck could still be used for brush fire and disaster 
work, and it is our recommendation that this truck be kept in reserve 
for this purpose. 

The Fire Department recognizes the growing need for sufficient 
equipment and coverage to give the Town adequate protection, and we 
feel efforts being made in this direction should receive attention 
without delay. 

We requested the Selectmen for the use of emergency powers to re- 
place the pump on Engine 32, shattered beyond repair while in use at 
a fire on Lincoln Road in December. 

Respectfully sutmitted: 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Chief 
William M. Dean, Clerk 
Frank Gordon 

Board of Fire Engineers 



71 



PROTECTION 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

The following animals have been inspected: 

Cows, 2 years and over 176 

Heifers, 1-2 years 51 

Heifers, under 1 year 51 

Bulls and "Angus Beef" 30 

Horses 42 

Sheep 12 

Swine 629 

These animals are all under the rules and regulations of the 
Division of Livestock Disease Control. 

Have supplied the Division of Livestock Disease Control with a 
list of the owners and the number and kind of animals in the Town. 

During the year, ten dog bites were reported. These dogs were 
placed in quarantine and were all released, since they showed no signs 
of rabies. 

Respectfully sutmitted: 

Andrew J. Dougherty 
Inspector of Animals 



72 



TREE WAREEN 
REPORT OF THE TREE WARDEN 

Once again your tree department has endeavored to utilize the 
annual appropriation where it would prove to be most beneficial. 

Our greatest problem remains the ever present Dutch Elm Disease. 
We contracted in late winter to have street elm trees bordering Bed- 
ford Road, Lexington Road Cemetery, and Ball Field Road to the Smith 
School thoroughly pruned to remove the dead and diseased wood. This 
work was satisfactorily performed and the treated trees seem to show 
increased vitality. 

Forty six elm trees were tagged and samples of wood from each tree 
sent to the Shade Tree laboratories at Amherst for culture. Of 
these, twenty five samples proved to be infected with Dutch Elm Dis- 
ease. In addition, fifty one other elms, being dead or nearly so, 
have been marked for removal by spring of 1957. A total of ninety 
seven trees should be removed. 

The late arrival of spring this year prevented a timely application 
of a dormant spray to the elms and necessitated a concentrated effort 
to apply the spray materials while they would be most effective. 
Consequently, the town sprayer could be seen some nights along the 
town streets as late as ten o 1 clock. I would like to point out that 
in spite of the seeming inconvenience to motorists who must pass 
through the sprayed area, this work must continue. The man who 
operates the gun has been ordered to cease spraying just as soon as a 
car comes in view. This he does and will continue to do, but the 
spray residue dripping from the saturated limbs of the trees overhead 
often lands on the passing cars and naturally irritates the operator. 
May I ask all to be patient with us during the periods of this spray 
application. We are endeavoring to do a thorough job to preserve 
our town trees with money derived from taxes you and I must pay, even 
though it may on occasion cause you some inconvenience. 

In July the annual Poison Ivy control spray was applied to all 
town streets and ways and we experienced some difficulty in confining 
the materials sprayed since the machine usually used for this work 
broke down beyond repair and the high pressure hydraulic sprayer used 
for tree spraying had to be used instead. This meant we had to apply 
ivy spray at a minimum of 400 pounds operating pressure, with less than 
satisfactory results. If this annual program is to be continued, it 
is essential that a sprayer operating at a very low pressure be ob- 
tained. A new product reached the market this year which they claim 
will destroy permanently all ivies sprayed with no toxic effect to 
humans or animals. We will endeavor to secure this material next 
season if the town residents wish to continue the program. 



73 



PROTECTION 



We fully realize the importance of controlling further spread of 
the Dutch Elm Disease to healthy trees. On the surface it appears 
to be a losing fight, although foresters and tree wardens of many 
towns and cities have been able to cut down their annual tree loss to 
as little as one or two per cent. To accomplish this in Lincoln 
would require an additional appropriation to enable us to enter out 
of the way swampy areas that continue to be the nucleus of the annual 
spread of the disease. There we would have to remove many seedling 
and storm damaged trees that would be accessible only when the swamp 
water was solidly frozen. Never having had any attention, these 
elm clumps are better than fifty per cent diseased and present a 
serious problem. 

This year we will remove one third fewer dead trees than we did 
in 1955. This may be an indication that we are making some progress. 
The fight is an important one if Lincoln is to remain the picturesque 
country town that it is. Budget cuts produce smaller taxes, look 
mighty good on paper, but can destroy the esthetic beauty of our 
town. 

Once again I would like to point out that this is your town and 
my town and each tree here is a heritage for us to preserve. They 
will respond to care and attention and we can best achieve that by 
forming a committee of genuinely interested members who are willing 
to give of their time to understand the problems, investigate the 
conditions existing, and vote necessary appropriations to meet the 
need. I will be happy to discuss the matter privately or in public 
in order to accomplish this need. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank both the Highway 
Department and the Police Department for their splendid cooperation, 
particularly in the matter of emergencies when trees and heavy limbs 
have fallen across the public ways and made conditions dangerous for 
the unsuspecting motorist. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Robert Ralston 

Tree Warden & Moth Superintendent 



Ik 



CIVIL EEFENSE 



CIVIL EEFENSE AGENCY 

The past year has seen few major changes in the over -all Civil De- 
fense picture. The concept of evacuation as being the most practica- 
ble action to take in the event of enemy attack has become the official 
policy of the State. Around this concept revolves much of the plan- 
ning of Civil Defense. It is quite apparent that because of the 
multitude of problems involved and the almost day to day advancement 
in the power and scope of nuclear weapons, this is not an easy task. 
However, in spite of the many difficulties encountered, a great deal 
is being done to pool the resources of the various municipalities and 
to coordinate their efforts so that effective protective measures can 
be taken when an emergency arises. 

In compliance with the State policy this agency has been working 
on evacuation plans which it hopes will serve as an adequate basis for 
action, if the need arises. As soon as completed, this plan, to- 
gether with general information, will be mailed to the citizens of the 
Town. 

During the past year continued emphasis has been placed on com- 
munications and the Auxiliary police organization. In order to pro- 
vide better reception at the control center in the Town Hall, new 
antennas have been installed. Under the direction of the Chief of 
Police monthly meetings have been held for auxiliaries for training 
and instruction. 

No large capital expenditures are anticipated in the near future. 
Perhaps the most pressing need is a warning system which will give 
greater coverage to the Town. The proposed new fire stations should 
go a long way toward solving this problem thus avoiding the necessity 
of an expensive independent system. Although the Government will 
re-imburse Towns up to 50% on the purchase of many items necessary to 
Civil Defense, such as heavy duty rescue trucks, a large spending pro- 
gram seems hardly justified at this time. Rather this agency, in 
the interests of economy has attempted to cooperate with the police 
and fire departments in the acquisition of necessary communications 
and other equipment whenever possible. 

In view of the fact that Civil Defense is probably here to stay, 
it is hoped that provisions for a permanent control center and head- 
quarters for the Civil Defense Agency can be incorporated in the plans 
of the new fire and police station. In this way the various pro- 
tective facilities of the Town can be located under one roof and tied 
in together. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Eveleth R. Todd 

Local Civil Defense Director 

75 



utealtk ana ( Welfare 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

At the first meeting of the Board of Health, held in March, 1956, 
Dr. Gordon A. Donaldson was elected Chairman and Mrs. Bradford 
Cannon Secretary and Representative on the Nursing Committee. Mrs. 
Marion Ober was appointed Agent; Mr. William Davis, Burial Agent; 
Mr. Andrew Dougherty, Inspector of Animals; Dr. Alden Russell, 
Inspector of Slaughtering. 

During the year the following licenses were granted: overnight 
cabins, 1; slaughtering of poultry, 2; piggeries, 2; sale of alcohol, 
6; garbage transportation, 3; massage, 1. As required by State law, 
the following communicable diseases were reported: measles, 92; 
chicken pox, 27; mumps, 33; dog bite, 10; equine encephalitis, 1; 
and salmenellosis, 6. During the year routine inspections were 
made by the Board of piggeries, cider presses, restaurants, stores, 
and overnight cabins. 

198 dogs were innoculated for rabies at the annual dog clinic 
held in May in the Town Barn. All dogs not protected at this clinic 
are checked by the police later in the year. 

The Well Child Clinic continues under the able guidance of Dr. 
John Davies. This clinic is open to all pre -school children, and 
is held every third Thursday in the Smith School Health Unit. Small 
pox vaccinations are given free of charge, but a fee of $1.25 is made 
for each preventative innoculation. This year, while the State 
Poliomyelitis Program is in effect, any pre-school child may receive 
free polio vaccine at this clinic. Appointments should be made 
through the Town Nurse. 19 babies were examined; 91 repeaters were 
seen; and 62 kindergarten children checked during the year. 

The Dental Clinic is served by Dr. David Farrell. The State - 
required routine diagnostic examination of all school children is 
carried out; and if treatment is needed a note is sent home to the 
parent or guardian to this effect, suggesting care either at the 
clinic or by a private dentist. Under the Fierce Fund bequest, the 
Dental Clinic was established in Lincoln to provide good, easily 
obtainable dental care to anyone under 21 who wished to use this 
service. The charge for treatment is $4.00 per half hour. 

The Garbage Collection Service continues to function for approx- 
imately 300 subscribers. The charge is $7.50 semi-annually, payable 
to the Town. 

Over the year, most of the Board's efforts have been directed 
toward the Poliomyelitis Vaccine program and toward building sanita- 

76 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



tion problems. There have been 6 polio clinics between April and 
December. Nearly all children between kindergarten and 9th grade 
have been vaccinated twice; and a clinic is planned on January 18th 
and 19th for the third and final injection of this group. In con- 
trast, the 1J+ to 20 year old group have been a great disappointment 
in that only a few have availed themselves of protection from this 
crippling disease. Only 22 individuals have sought protection, 
although it is probable that many more have been vaccinated privately 
or at school. The prevention of infantile paralysis in the future 
is becoming the responsibility of the individual, as the disease is 
now preventable! Free vaccine will be available from the Board of 
Health for individuals through age 30 until July, 1957. After this 
date, free vaccine will be supplied to infants and pregnant women 
only. 

The supervision of building sanitation has become so complex that 
the Selectmen and Board of Health have sought expert professional 
help from a recognized firm in this field. Inspection of any pro- 
posed building sites is made weekly, a service which began in April. 
At the moment, the cost of the preliminary sanitation survey is 
borne by the Town. Later, it will be included in the building per- 
mit fee, as prescribed by the new Building Code. Building permits 
are issued only after signature by the Building Inspector and a 
member of the Board of Health; and the approval of the latter depends 
largely on the opinion of the professional sanitary engineer. No 
subdivisions of land were approved in Lincoln this year. 

In previous reports, the value of fluorine in drinking water has 
been discussed. Facts are rapidly accumulating to indicate that 
fluorine, 1 part per million, in drinking water prevents tooth decay 
in children. We continue to urge further interest in this matter 
on the part of the townspeople, and hope that with the cooperation 
of the agencies within the Town it will be possible to disseminate 
information relative to fluorine within the year. The Board of 
Health hopes that opinion may soon be crystallized so that the Town 
may vote on this important measure. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Ellen DeN. Cannon 

Walter Hill 

Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D. , Chairman 



77 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



REPORT OF THE NURSING COMMITTEE 
1956 

The activities of the Nursing Committee have centered around the 
Well -Child Conference, the Dental Clinic and the Polio Clinics. 
The committee meets on the Friday following the third Thursday of 
each month. This year, thanks to the Lincoln Sewing Circle, the 
volunteers at the Well-Child Conference have new smocks to wear 
while on duty. 

The committee has met twice with the Selectmen to review the 
management of the Dental Clinic. Bills for dental care are sent 
out by the Nursing Committee and are payable on receipt. Bills out- 
standing for more than three months are automatically referred to the 
Selectmen for collection. 

The Nursing Committee has been responsible for the management of 
the Polio Clinics. These clinics have gone very smoothly and we 
are deeply indebted to our local doctors, nurses and lay workers who 
contributed their services so generously at all six clinics and who 
have expressed their readiness to help at the clinics to be held in 
January and May. The polio program in Lincoln will be terminated 
after the clinics in May. 

The Nursing Committee had one meeting with the State Nursing 
Supervisor, Miss Sophie Kasperovitch, who presented the health picture 
of Middlesex County to us and discussed various phases of nursing 
care, social service and public welfare applicable to Lincoln. 

The work of our community nurse still continues to be devoted 
almost entirely to the Schools and Clinics. 

Mrs. James Corrigan served the town during Mrs. Ober's vacation 
in August. 





1956 SUMMARI 




Number of calls: 




1133 


Medical 




uo 


Surgical 




85 


Pre-Natal 




12 


Post-Natal 




U 


Child Welfare 




366 


Social Service 




85 


Board of Health 




45 


Well Child Conference and Dental Clinic 


63 


Out of Town 




64 



78 



NURSING COMMITTEE 



Number of patients moved away 4 
Number of patients moved to hospitals or 

nursing homes 2 

Number of patients as of December 31, 1956 1U 

Number of new patients 6 

Number of patients died 5 

Total Fees Collected 

Nursing Calls $ 211.00 

Dental Clinic 2694.30 

Well -Child Conference 33.50 

Dog Clinic 99.00 

Total $3037.80 

Respectfully submitted: 

Ellen DeN. Cannon, Chairman 

Elizabeth Donaldson 

Louise H. McClennen, Secretary 



79 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



EEPORT OF THE PUBLIC ASSISTANCE AGENT 



The first responsibility of the public assistance agency is to 
meet the basic needs of individuals who are themselves unable to 
meet them, and, by providing necessary services, to assist persons 
in developing their capacity for self -maintenance to the fullest 
extent possible to them. 

Aid was given to 28 cases under the Old Age Assistance program 
during the year 1956. 4 cases were closed during the year and 2 
were added. At the close of the year 24 cases were receiving assist, 
ance. 

Gross Cost $28,039.86 

Receipts: 

Balance from 1955 .... $ 102.69 

U. S. Government .... 10,171.52 

Comm. of Mass 13,819.91 

Comm. of Mass. , 

Meals Tax 846.84 

Other Cities & Towns . . 606.67 25,547.63 
Cost to the Town of Lincoln 4,214.76 

$29,762.39 
Reserved for Old Age Assistance 1,722.53 

$28,039.86 

Aid was given to one family under the Aid to Dependent Children 
program during the year 1956. 

Gross Cost $ 514.54 

Receipts: 

Balance from 1955 ... $ 96.16 

U. S. Government .... 529.65 

Comm. of Mass 397.18 1,022.99 

Reserved for A. D. C. $ 361.58 

Aid was given to one case under the Disability Assistance program 
during the year 1956. 

Gross Cost $ 165.62 

Respectfully submitted: 

M. Elizabeth Causer, Agent 

80 



MOSQUITO CONTROL 



REPORT OF THE MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMISSIONER 

A statement of work done and the financial picture is set forth 
in the appended report to me from the Commission's Superintendent. 
The anticipated balance at the end of April, 1957, is approximately 
one hundred and sixty dollars. 

Because of the increase in costs some towns in which there is 
much drainage work to be done have been asked to increase their appro- 
priations so that the work may be done at the rate originally antici- 
pated. I believe this to be in the interest of the Town and recom- 
mend that the appropriation for 1957 be $6,500. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles H. Blake, Commissioner 



MOSQUITO CONTROL IN LINCOLN IN 1956 

This report is based on data to December 8, 1956. The fiscal 
year ends on December 31st. The actual budgeting, however, extends 
through April, 1957. 

Mosquito control work included the dusting of approximately 344- 
acres of swamplands by hand during the winter and the early spring 
spraying of about 40 acres. This was supplemented by aircraft spray, 
ing of approximately 500 acres. All this was directed against the 
spring brood of mosquitoes. These several species are the main 
problem until after mid summer. Results were fair, but about 300 
acres had to be resprayed by air during June mainly as an adult mos- 
quito control measure. In July aircraft spraying was done over 
about 300 acres primarily for the control of the mosquito Mansonia 
per turbans . In August there was some alarm about encephalitis and 
several localities were sprayed by air (150 acres) and a considerable 
amount of fogging was done with ground apparatus. 

Drainage work planned for the fall and winter has not begun. The 
work which was begun in the general vicinity of the railroad station 
should be finished. In addition it should be possible to clean old 
ditches in several other locations. About $1,500 of the budget is 
set aside for this purpose. 

During the coming winter and spring we plan to do about the same 
dusting and spraying as in the previous season. This work will be 
reported in 1957, but it is financed from the 1956 budget. 



81 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 
MOSQUITO CONTROL IN LINCOLN IN 1956 

Financial Statement 

Balance on hand January 1, 1956 $ 901.25 

Appropriation for 1956 (received May 5th) 6,000.00 

Total Funds $6,901.25 

Expenditures to December 8, 1956 (plus bills due) 

Labor $1,196.25 

Aircraft services 646. 00 

Insecticides 481. 50 

Field operations, equipment, etc. 1,091.95 

Office costs 542.22 

Office rent (credit Cambridge) 47.00 

Subtotal $3,994.92 

Credit from Bedford 57.60 

Net Expenditure $3,937.32 

Balance on December 8, 1956 $2,963.93 

Reserve for drainage $1,500.00 

Reserve for midwinter dusting, 

April spraying and overhead 

costs to May, 1957 $ 1,300.00 

$2,800.00 

The East Middlesex Mosquito Control Commission has requested 
an appropriation of $6,500 for 1957. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Robert L. Armstrong 

Super intendent 



82 



TL 



anniYMj 

ana JPudllc \oYorks 

REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD 

The Planning Board was organized at Vts first meeting with E. A. 
Black, Chairman and Alan McClennen, Clerk. This year the Board has 
had to spend a relatively small amount of its time on subdivision 
development. This is in strong contrast to the work of the Board in 
recent years and is undoubtedly the preliminary result, at least, of 
our two acre zoning by-law. Within the last month two fairly sub- 
stantial subdivisions have appeared in their initial stages. 

Route 2 Relocation 

A subcommittee consisting of Mrs. White and Mr. Bogner made a 
thorough and practical study of four possible routes which a reloca- 
tion of Route 2 might take through the Town. These ranged from a 
route which would go from Route 128 northerly to near the boundary 
of Hanscom Field, then rejoining Route 2 near Crosby's Filling Sta- 
tion, to one which would go from Route 128 along the existing Route 
2, thence south of Tracy's Filling Station along the north side of 
Sandy Pond and rejoining Route 2. The route unanimously preferred 
by the Planning Board is one which runs from Route 128 generally mid- 
way between Routes 2 and 2A and rejoins Route 2 near Crosby's Filling 
Station. It is felt that this route is least detrimental to the 
Town, from the standpoint of physical division and the condemning of 
valuable property. It is slightly longer than some of the other 
routes, but might be no more expensive to the State. The Planning 
Board strongly urged a serious consideration of this route to the 
Department of Public Works. We were assured it would be carefully 
studied. At this date, no decision has been made, but it is believed 
that the Department of Public Works still favors a route substantially 
following Route 2, then passing south of Tracy's and rejoining Route 
2 between Sandy Pond Road and the Concord line. 

Industrial Zoning 

Intermittently, since 194-6, the report of the Planning Board has 
recommended expanded business or light industrial zoning. No action 
has ever been taken. Whether this is because of a genuine disapproval 
on the part of the Town or a lack of aggressiveness on the part of the 
Planning Board cannot be determined. Because of the rapidly increas- 
ing demands on the Town's finances for schools and other expanded faci- 
lities, and more recently the substantial encroachment by Hanscom 
Field, consideration of such zoning becomes more and more urgent. A 
majority of three members of the Board would recommend an area south 
of Route 2A and west of Mill Street. This area becomes less and less 

83 



FUUDOIC BOLRD 

attractive for housing :.;: tLc traffic and activity at Hanscom Field 
expands. For some types of research and light industry, its value 
increases for the very same reasons. Industrial zoning carefully 
done would have the effect of substantially broadening the tax base 
and at the same time creating such an increase in economic values that 
the Air Force would be forced by high costs of land-taking to look 
elsewhere for space for their continuing expansion. 

Two members of the Board are not ready to join in the recommenda- 
tion that an industrial zone be established for the following reasons: 
There exists no assurance that a gain on the tax-base may not be 
greatly offset by losses in the amenities this residential community 
now offers; and there is no reason to feel sure that an island of 
industrial development in North Lincoln will act as an effective ■ 
deterrent to the expansion of Hanscom Field by the Federal Government. 
Therefore, before such a decisive step is taken, it appears necessary 
to present the voters with all obtainable information on the immediate 
and long-range consequences of such a move. Also, this problem has 
again brought into focus the Town's need for basic facts on the other 
problems facing the Town. In order to do this, the minority of the 
Planning Board recommends the development of necessary factual data 
by a planning consultant. Federal aid toward such planning is now 
available. 

During the year members of the Planning Board have discussed 
purely office building developments with several substantial companies. 
In each case it was felt that the personnel problems created by the 
location overcame the desirability of low cost, pleasant country 
surroundings. This is due largely to the fact that operations of this 
kind employ a large percentage of women and transportation becomes a 
paramount problem. It appears that operations of a research or light 
industrial nature might be much more readily attracted. 

South Lincoln and Fire Station 

During the year the Planning Board has made an intensive study of 
the business district in the area of the Station. There is increas- 
ing pressure for commercial expansion here because of the growth of 
the Town. Parking facilities are rapidly becoming inadequate, if 
they are not already. The existing pattern of commercial soning and 
its relation to Lincoln Road does not present an opportunity for a 
practical or attractive expansion of the parking and shopping facili- 
ties. Mr. McClennen has made an extensive study of the area and 
the problems and has presented a plan which is wholeheartedly endorsed 
by the Board. This plan involves the relocation of Lincoln Road, 
starting at Codman Road and going some 275 feet to the west at the 
midpoint, then rejoining Lincoln Road. The present Lincoln Road 
would be closed as a through street and the grade crossing relocated. 
This would then provide an ample integrated shopping area, all east 
of the through traffic and isolated from it. Substantial parking 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



facilities would be available and a genuine carefully planned com- 
munity shopping center would result. 

At the same time that this study was in progress, the Fire Station 
Site Committee was making its studies. Several meetings were held 
between representatives of the two groups and it was found that there 
was no conflict between this long term plan of the Planning Board and 
that of the Fire Station Site Committee. 

There are a number of problems to be resolved before such a plan 
can be instituted and it is not recommended that the Town take steps 
at this time to acquire land or relocate the road. It would be 
desirable if the relocation of the road could be accomplished under 
Chapter 90, but at this time it is by no means clear whether the 
State and County would approve. The relocation of the grade cross- 
ing presents another problem and the extent of this expense is not 
known. Some time will be required to resolve these various problems 
and determine the entire practicality of the plan. The Planning 
Board will actively pursue the determination of these unknowns so 
that it can eventually present the Town with an accurate picture of 
the costs involved and the benefits to be derived. In the meantime, 
this remains as a long range plan to guide the Planning Board in the 
orderly development of the general area. 

Respectfully submitted: 

E. A. Black, Chairman 
Alan McClennen, Clerk 
Arthur T. Howard 
Katharine S. White 
Walter F. Bogner 



85 



BQfcRD OF APPEALS 



REPORT OF BOARD OF APPEALS 

The growth of the Town, and the changes in the Zoning By-Law, 
result in a continuing need for careful interpretation so that the 
terms of the existing Zoning By-Law may properly be applied to 
situations coming before the Board. This results not only in the 
hearing of numerous appeals and the writing of numerous decisions, 
but also in the development by the Board of carefully considered 
definitions and policies. 

Set forth below is a summary of the decisions of the Board: 

Application of Francis Umbrello for permission to build a road- 
side 3tand on his property on South Great Road, less than 40 feet 
from the line -of -way, denied. 

Application of James DeNormandie for permission to remove 
surplus loam on Trapelo Road and also on his property on Route #117, 
granted. 

Application of Hope Hunt for permission to build on non- 
conforming lot on Conant Road, granted with restrictions. 

Application of Harriet L. Hardy, M. D. for a variance of the 
Zoning By-law to permit the construction of a tool shed on her 
property on Weston Road, granted. 

Application of David Todd for permission to relocate septic 
tank or cesspool in front of former telephone exchange on Lincoln 
Road, denied. 

Application of Manley Boyce for permission to remove surplus 
loam from his farm on Old Sudbury Road, South Lincoln, granted. 

Application of Thomas Mix for a variance of the Zoning By-Law 
to permit division of his property on Lincoln Road into two lots, 
the first of which would conform in all respects to the Zoning By- 
laws and the second of which would be non-conforming in that the 
shortest distance through an existing single family dwelling house 
thereon, from side lot line to side lot line, will be 217 feet, and 
(under an alternate plan) this lot would contain 59,886 square feet, 
denied. 

Application of Richard E. Powers of Old Bedford Road for per- 
mission to build a garage and breezeway less than thirty feet from 
the side lot line, denied. 

Application of Gardner Tucker for permission to build a dwelling 
on Lincoln Road, South Lincoln, less than 30 feet from the side lot 

86 



PUNNING AND PUBLIC WQR$S 



line, granted, 



Application of S. Y. Lee and lao Tza Li of Watertown, Mass. for 
permission to alter lot line between lots #22 and #23 on Huckleberry 
Hill, granted. 

Application of Walter Barthel for permission to divide a 6.8 
acre lot at the corner of Virginia Road and Old Bedford Road into 
four building lots, denied. 

Application of Nicholas Lindsay for permission to install 
another gasoline tank on service station premises at the intersection 
of Route 2A and the Turnpike by -pass, granted. 

Application of John Tew for St. Anne's Church of Lincoln, Mass. 
for permission to build an addition to the present parish house 
which is located on a non-conforming lot, granted. 

Application of Anthony Cassis for permission to sell all 
vacant land owned by him off the Cambridge Turnpike (Route 2) ex- 
cept an area of approximately £0,750 square feet on which a dwelling 
house now exists, marked Lot "A" on plan entitled "Lincoln Charm 
Acres'* dated December 27, 195A, plan of S. Albert Kaufman, denied. 

Application of John A. Carley for permission to alter dwelling 
on non-conforming lot on Macintosh lane, granted. 

Application of G. A. Wiley for permission to divide land on 
Lexington Road under terms of old Zoning By-Law of the Town, allowed 
with certain restrictions. 

Application of Paul F. Shepard for permission to divide his land 
on Old Bedford Road into two lots not conforming to the present 
Zoning By-Law, denied. 

Application of Antonio DiGiovanni and Jean DiGiovanni for per- 
mission to remodel a garage into a dwelling on premises on South 
Great Road, granted. 

Application of Manley B. Boyce for a license for not more than * 
one year to receive, store, sort and send out vegetable boxes and 
crates on his property on Old Sudbury Road, granted for one year, 
conditionally. 

Application of Edward Boyer for renewal of temporary license 
to allow the sale of new and used cars at his garage on South Great 
Road, granted until December 31, 1957, subject to restrictions. 



87 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Application of Henry and Eleanor Pallotta of Winter Street for 
permission to allow a trailer on their property to be occupied by 
and for the convenience of Gabrielle Coignat until June, 1957, with- 
out further extension, granted with certain stipulations, until June 
15, 1957. 

Application of George R. Harrison of 2J+ Oakley Road, Belmont 78, 
Mass. for permission to remove surplus material from his property on 
South Great Road, granted under the provisions of Section 51 of the 
Zoning By-Law. 

Application of Quincy W. Wales for permission to remove surplus 
soil from his property on Weston Road, granted under the provisions 
of Section 51 of the Zoning By-Law. 

Application of Charles and Katrina Jenney for a variance to 
allow them to rebuild a damaged garage on their Bedford Road property 
which does not conform to present Zoning By-Laws, granted. 

Application of Thomas T. and Stella A. Giles for a variance to 
allow a subdivision of their land at South Great Road to create a 
lot containing 40,600 square feet more or less which will not conform 
to the present Zoning By-Laws, denied. 

Respectfully sutmitted: 

Thomas B. Adams 
William M. Dean 
Henry B. Hoover 
Hans Van Leer 
John White, Chairman 



88 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

The Board held thirteen meetings during the year. 

No subdivisions were submitted for formal action, but in a number 
of instances members of the Board sat in on preliminary hearings be- 
fore the Planning Board. Board members are always willing to be 
consulted by developers or subdividers to assist them in planning the 
installation of water mains according to the regulations. 

Customers on Brooks Road and Old Concord Turnpike were frequently 
without water last summer, and as a serious emergency developed, the 
Town was asked to vote to borrow $60,000 to renew these, mains. 

Coffin & Richardson prepared specifications from the use of State 
Road plans and on the ground surveys, which proposed an 8 n main from 
the corner of Brooks Road and Route 2A along Brooks Road, across 
Route 2, thence along the remaining section of the Old Concord Turn- 
pike and along Route 2 until it reaches and joins a six inch pipe 
below the Leslie Farm, a total of 5,200 linear feet. 

Greenough Bros., as low bidders, were awarded the contract. They 
performed the work speedily and satisfactorily. The complete job, 
including materials and engineering, cost $48,018.08 of the $50,000 
which was borrowed. The Superintendent and the assistant performed 
a very excellent job in inspection. 

The Director of the Water Division of the Metropolitan District 
Commission advises that there are at present no definite plans for 
extending M.D. C. mains toward Lincoln. However, with increased 
demands due to housing, construction, Government facilities, etc., 
consideration may be given at some future time. 

The chlorinator operates well, but the sodium hypochlorite corrodes 
some of the fittings, causing leaks which damage the floor. The 
supplier is endeavoring to correct this trouble, although he claims 
the problem is very difficult. 

The Board desires to keep the inhabitants conscious of possible 
pollution of Sandy Pond. It relies on the Water Works personnel, 
the DeCordova and Dana Museum personnel, the abutting land owners, 
and the police to prevent trespassing on, in, or near the pond. If 
these efforts are not successful, the Town could consider the erection 
of a fence on the lands where the offences are hardest to control. 

The Commissioners wish to record their appreciation to the Super- 
intendent and his assistant for the interest they exhibit in their 
work, and for their general efficiency and cooperation. 



89 



INSPECTORS 



Water Department Statistics, January, 1957 

Pipe in use 31.0 M. 

Number of hydrants in use 239 

Number of stop-gates in use 283 

Number of blow- off s in use 27 

Range of pressure on mains 40 - 100 lbs, 

Total gallons pumped 100,852,300 gals 

Number of services added 66 

Number of services renewed 14 

Number of services in use m 956 

Number of meters in use 930 

Respectfully submitted: 

Henry Warner, Secretary 
Edward S. Taylor 
Sumner Smith, Chairman 



INSPECTORS OF BUILDING, PLUMBING AND WIRING 



Building permits issued during 1956: 

New residential buildings 73 

New non-residential buildings 21 

Alterations and additions 21 

Buildings demolished 2 

Fees collected $428.00 

Plumbing permits issued during 1956 102 

Fees collected 194.00 

Wiring permits issued during 1956 173 

Fees collected 310.50 



Respectfully submitted: 

Walter Bergquist, Building Inspector 
William M. Dean, Wiring Inspector 
Daniel J. Murphy, Plumbing Inspector 



90 



PUNNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



REPORT OF HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



The Highway Department always has problems but the past year 
offered a few more than were anticipated. The spring snow storms 
not only caused a great deal of work but, particularly, they slowed 
up the normal operations of the Department during the year. The 
spring clean-up was delayed, road patching was delayed and the 
normal plans for road work had to be altered. The County was 
similarly delayed in its programs due to the storms, and the Chapter 
90 work planned for Route #126 and on Trapelo Road was delayed long 
after the normal season for such repairs to be accomplished under 
good weather conditions. 

Much time was spent on flood control work, in addition to regular 
duties. Extra help was hired in the summer months to supplement 
the regular work force. Michael Ciraso has joined the Department 
as a regular employee. We are anxious to increase our permanent 
force in order to give the citizens better service and to accomplish 
more work on our roads. 

As for our equipment, many of the heavy duty items are old and 
have been giving serious trouble. The time seems to have arrived 
when new trucks, front end loader and grader must be considered. 
Without proper equipment it is impossible to give the service re- 
quired by the Town. 

The men of the Department have co-operated fully and willingly. 
Considering the many unforeseen problems, we have endeavored to give 
the town the best possible service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Raymond C. Maher 

Superintendent, Highway Department 



91 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Normal work of a maintenance nature continued to be the principal 
activity during the year. 

Interments during 1956 



January 28 




Frederick Thornton Lord 


" 29 


-- 


Clara Louise Chapin 


February 26 


— 


Robert Curtis Chapin 


March 31 


__. 


Arthur Charles Lamb 


April 7 


_— 


Herbert Lincoln Moore, Jr 


" 11 


__ 


Frederick J. Bamforth 


n u 


— 


Andrew Doherty 


" 2A 


_. 


Abbie E. Bunker 


May 15 


_„ 


Carrie Wentworth Hartwell 


" 25 


— 


Earl Russell Harvey 


" 25 


— 


Henry Kirwin 


June 27 


— 


John Peabody Monks 


July U 


— 


Pasquale Bova Conti 


" 15 


— 


Patricia Browning 


" 28 


— 


Frank J. Flynn 


August 1 


— 


Frederick Murphy 


" 22 


— 


Henry A. Butcher 


September 6 


— 


Johanna Peterson 


■ 12 


— 


Harry Causer 


October 1 


__ 


Julia Catherine Southner 


■ 22 


__. 


Tamzin K. Robus 


■ 22 


__ 


Thomas Clarke 


November 21+ 


— 


Katherine Cunningham 


December 6 


__ 


Ernest F. Russ 


" 27 


— 


William Liddell 



For report on Perpetual Care Funds and Cemetery Investment Fund, 
see Treasurer 1 s Report. 

Respectfully submitted: 

George E. Cunningham 
Robert D. Donaldson 
Arnold MacLean 



92 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



LONG TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 



Pursuant to the vote under Article 20 of the 1956 Annual Town 
Meeting, the Moderator appointed the undersigned to continue to in- 
vestigate the long-term capital requirements of the Town, and report 
before the 1957 Town Meeting. At its first meeting, the Committee 
organized itself with William M. Rand, Chairman, and Maurice E. 
Shank, Clerk. 

The committee has again met with the relevant boards, committees 
and officers of the Town and discussed their plans. These have 
been evaluated in a report which is being published and distributed 
under separate cover. 

The separately published report, in addition to its evaluation of 
various new proposals for capital improvements, again makes certain 
recommendations for future planning of capital expenditures. 

Respectfully submitted: 

William M. Rand, Chairman 

Maurice E. Shank 

Charles P. Kindleberger 

William T. King, for the Selectmen 

William N. Page, for the Finance Committee 

Alan McClennan, for the Planning Board 



93 



PUBLIC IAND STUDY COMMITTEE 



FINAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC IAND STUDY COMMITTEE 

The study of the acquisition of public lands demands an inquiry 
into the needs for such lands, their uses and value to the town, the 
cost and possibilities of acquisition. These points must be con- 
sidered on the basis of long range objectives with an awareness of 
the great changes that must be anticipated due to the rapid develop- 
ment of land in and about this town on the fringe of an expanding 
metropolitan area. At the present time, Lincoln enjoys among its 
numerous amenities the unspoiled character of a sparsely developed 
New England landscape traversed ty roads of a pleasant rural charac- 
ter, frequently lined by stately shade trees. The future will 
bring more people, more houses and more traffic into the Town. Less 
open land will remain for the enjoyment of the citizen. That is 
when public land will be needed the most, and that is the time when 
it will be hardest to come by. 

The Land Use Survey of the Planning Board of May, 1955, and 
statistics made available by the League of Women Voters in February, 
1954, indicate an accelerating growth of the Town. The consequences 
of this growth will have to be dealt with in planning for the future, 
if the citizens of Lincoln wish to safeguard the amenities they now 
enjoy. To accomplish the latter, the Planning Board, supported by 
the voters, has taken constructive measures to prevent an excessively- 
dense development of the existing land and to regulate land use 
through zoning regulations. However, these measures do not set 
aside land that will be needed in the future for common use and en- 
joyment by the citizens, and for the protection or conservation of 
amenities. Aware of this problem, the Planning Board concerned it- 
self with Public Reservation Areas during its 1955 Land Use Survey 
and recommended the establish ment of a special committee to study 
the matter. The Public Land Study committee was set up for this 
purpose, and was provided with "Findings and Conclusions relative to 
Land Acquisition" prepared as a part of the Planning Board's Land 
Use Survey. 

The Public Land Study committee in considering the establishment 
of a reserve of public land for definite uses and long range value 
to the Town has been guided by the following objectives: 

1. The protection of the existing qualities of the Town and 
the enhancement of property values. 

2. The safeguarding of the purity of the Town's drinking 
water supply. 

3. The provision of recreational areas for playgrounds, 
nature walks, scout activities, and horseback riding. 

U. The setting aside of existing marginal land for the 

benefit of the Town. 
5. The need for expansion of the road net-work to reduce 

the dangers from increasing traffic and to eliminate 

94 



PUNNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

hazards, and to prevent damage to property and the loss 
of shade trees on the existing major roads. 

6. The provision of sites for public buildings and for the 
services of the Town. 

7. The conservation of the beauty of the landscape and the 
protection of the shores of Sandy Pond and Beaver Pond 
against unsightly encroachments. 

The "Findings and Conclusions Relative to land Acquisition" of the 
Planning Board listed nine areas of land and identified these on a 
map entitled "1955 Land Use Study - Public Reservation Areas". Areas 
1, 2, and 3 were considered undesirable areas for public acquisition 
because of the proximity to the airport and the annoyance of low-flying 
aircraft. Area 6 was not considered desirable for further study at 
this time because the area is bisected by the railroad and because of 
the swampy nature of the terrain. Areas 8 and 9, being on the ex- 
treme borders of the town, were also given a low priority for consider- 
ation by the Public Land Study Committee. 

The following areas have been studied by the Public land Committee: 

SANDT POND WATERSHED 

The legal firm of Newton and Weir was engaged to make a thorough 
study of the rights of the Town as they relate to Sandy Pond. It is 
the opinion of this counsel that the Town owns Sandy Pond and a pro- 
tective strip around it, from the DeCordova property to a point approx- 
imately half way down the westerly shore of the pond. This strip 
varies somewhat, but is about 65 to 70 feet in width measuring from 
the high water mark. On March 10, 1896, by virtue of Chapter 188 of 
the Acts of 1872, the Town acquired this land. A plan of this taking 
is recorded in Plan Book 96, Plan 18 recorded in the Middlesex Regis- 
try of Deeds, So. District. 

The complete report of the examination of the records, along with 
photostatic copies of the plan of the 1896 takings and subsequent 
releases are on file at the Town Hall. Although the Committee does 
not advocate any additional action be taken at this time as regards 
the Sandy Pond area, the investigation of the area has somewhat clari- 
fied the ownership and rights of the Town regarding its water supply 
and the surrounding land. 

Recent developments in the Town, such as the Bedford Airport 
Housing Development and possible relocation of Route 2, have changed 
the thinking of the Committee since the Interim Report was published. 
The recommendations for additional land acquisition are now limited 
to two areas. 



95 



PUBLIC LAND STUDY COMMITTEE 



RECREATIONAL AREA IN NORTH LINCOLN 

The Committee thinks that the Town should consider acquiring at a 
future date approximately 20 acres of land in North Lincoln for recrea- 
tional use. A possible site lies in the flat, arable land south of 
North Great Road (Route 2k), - in general, opposite the Cook Farm 
Stand between the present Town Dump and Bedford Road. The Committee 
feels that immediate and specific selection of the area should be de- 
ferred until some of the more pressing problems which face the Town 
have been solved. When final action has been taken on the relocation 
of Route 2 and the desires of the Federal Government have been made 
clear concerning the development of an Historic National Park, it is 
reconmended that the Town examine the problem of a recreational area 
in greater detail than can be set forth at present. 

LOW LAND EXTENDING FROM NORTH TO SOUTH LINCOLN 

The year that has elapsed since the submission of the Interim 
Report in February, 1956, has given added emphasis to the need for 
reserves of public land. The Committee reaffirms the objects out- 
lined in this report and again recommends that the Town consider the 
acquisition of the strip of low land extending from North to South 
Lincoln. Roughly speaking, it encompasses an almost continuous strip 
of swamps and connecting low lands running north and south parallel to 
Lincoln and Bedford Roads and about a half a mile to the east. For 
a more detailed indication of the swamp area the U. S. Geological Map 
may be consulted. The Interim Report describes the area as "Reserva- 
tion B M , explains the value of the area to the town and gives a map 
outlining the strip. 

At a future Town Meeting, the citizens of Lincoln should be given 
the opportunity to vote on acquiring or gaining control by the Town of 
any or all of the recommended reserves. The Committee suggests that 
such action be taken as soon as the Planning Board is able to aid the 
voters in reaching a decision by the submission of factual data on the 
needs of the Town and a plan or policy for the future development of 
the Town. 

Since the first meeting on October 5, 1955, the Committee has had 
fifteen meetings and given careful consideration to many areas and 
many plans. The foregoing recommendations have been given a great 
deal of careful thought. 

The sum of $500 was appropriated June 6, 1955, for the use of the 
Committee. The following is a summary of the expenses of the Com- 
mittee . 



96 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



PUBLIC LANDS STUDY COMMITTEE 

EXPENSES: 

Photostats $ 25.03 

Postage and Miscellaneous 1.43 

Typing of 1956 Report 5.00 

Printing of 1956 Report 60.00 

Aerial Photos of Lincoln 72.00 

Title search Sandy Pond area 154.80 

TOTAL COMMITTEE EXPENSE $318.26 



A more detailed report than space will permit here will be sent to 
the Planning Board and Board of Selectmen. 

The Committee begs to be discharged. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Albert M. Avery 

Walter F. Bogner 

Lucy E. Bygrave 

Arthur T. Howard 

Russell P. Mahan, Chairman 



97 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

REPORT OF THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

The Elementary School Building Committee submits herewith its 
first interim report. 

This Committee was appointed by the Moderator pursuant to vote of 
the Town under Article 25 of the Adjourned Annual Meeting held on 
March 21, 1956. It was originally authorized to determine and re- 
port upon the building needs of the Town's elementary school system, 
but found, very early in its deliberations, that the needs were 
immediate and time a most important factor. Projections of school 
enrollment for the ensuing ten years furnished by the Superintendent 
and the School Committee showed an expected growth in school popula- 
tion requiring, without the utilization of South School, six more 
classrooms than are presently available for the fall of 1957 and 20 
additional classrooms by the fall of 1965. The Committee believes 
that the effective planning and building for future elementary class- 
rooms shall be undertaken with full recognition that the need is for 
20 additional classrooms within ten years. 

Since it was apparent that the need for further classrooms was 
immediate, the Committee has retained the services of Anderson, 
Beckwith and Haible, Architects. The Committee has considered at 
length whether, for the inmediate future, the homogeneous growth of 
the Town would be best served by continued elementary school develop- 
ment on a centralized rather than decentralized plan. Our conclusion 
is that centralized schools tend to promote community "oneness" and 
simultaneously enhance educational and administrative efficiency. 

The Committee has discussed extensively the advisability of an 
addition to either the Center School or the Charles Sumner Smith 
School. The considered opinion of the Committee is that future 
flexibility in the growth of the elementary school plant, particular- 
ly in the light of a demonstrable need for 20 additional classrooms 
within ten years, indicates the desirability of acquiring a new site 
in the vicinity of the Charles Sumner Smith School. Accordingly, 
the Committee recommended for the approval of the Town at a special 
Town Meeting on December 18, 1956, the acquisition of two parcels of 
land, the first consisting of approximately 10.7 acres with frontage 
on Lincoln Road between land of Newton and land of Cousins and border- 
ing on the ballfield, the second consisting of approximately 2.5 acres 
situated on the westerly side of the Smith School site and contiguous 
to it. The first parcel was formerly owned by Sumner Smith and at 
the time of the special Town Meeting was owned by Jennie V. McClellan; 
the second was owned by Dr. and Mrs. Perry J. Culver. The availa- 
bility of both parcels for acquisition by the Town had been determined 
in advance of the special Town Meeting. The Committee recommended 
acquisition of the 10.7 acre parcel as the building site for a new 
elementary school. The area and topography of the parcel are such 

98 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



that it can accommodate, in the opinion of the Architects and engi- 
neers, an eventual 20 classroom structure. The Committee recommended 
acquisition of the 2.5 acre parcel for development in conjunction with 
land already owned by the Town on the westerly side of the Smith 
School site as additional space for outdoor school activities. 

After favorable action by the Town at the special meeting, an 
order for the taking of both parcels was recorded by the Selectmen 
on December 31 > 1956. Acquisition was accomplished by eminent 
domain to avoid any difficulty with respect to the state of title. 
The purchase price for each parcel, approved by the Town and agreed 
to by the respective owners will, of course, be paid to the owners 
notwithstanding the method of acquisition. 

Since the special Town Meeting, the Committee has met with its 
Architects to begin preparation of preliminary plans for the initial 
classroom structure on the 10.7 acre parcel. The Committee hopes 
to bring these plans before the Town at an early date so that if they 
are approved by the Town construction may begin as soon as possible. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 
Andrew J. Dougherty 
Ernest P. Neumann 
Gerard C. Henderson, Jr. 
George H. Kidder, Chairman 



99 



POLICE -FIRE STATION PUNS COMMITTEE 



REPORT OF POLICE -FIRE STATION PUNS COMMITTEE 



At the December, 1956, Special Town Meeting $3,500 was appro- 
priated towards the cost of acquiring the Codman Road-Lincoln Road 
site recommended for a combined Police and Fire Station. The lot 
runs about 2^0 feet on each side at the intersection and contains 
58,903 square feet of land. It is considered adequate for future 
building expansion together with suitable parking area and land- 
scaping. 

At the December meeting the Site Selection Committee was asked by 
the Selectmen to organize as a Building Plans Committee. In the 
short interval since acquisition of the land this Committee has been 
unable to speed its work to a point where specific recommendations 
as to type, size and cost of a suitable structure could be put be- 
fore the Annual Meeting in March this year. In that there is some 
urgency to provide new quarters for apparatus in South Lincoln the 
Committee intends to bring its proposals before a Special Meeting 
early in the spring. 

Your Committee intends to recommend plans for a one -story build- 
ing of conservative design adequate to meet the growing needs of the 
next ten years with room for addition thereafter if indicated. On- 
the-spot studies have been made of numerous buildings approaching 
our needs that have been recently built in nearby Towns. An alarm- 
ingly wide variation in costs of these structures has cautioned the 
Committee to proceed slowly so that it can be reasonably certain its 
final plans will come within the $100,000 budgeted for this project 
a few years ago by the Long-Term Capital Plans Committee. At the 
time of this report it is felt that this objective will be accom- 
plished. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Leo J. Algeo 
Andrew J. Dougherty 
Ernest Johnson 
William N. Swift 
Robert H. Booth, Chairman 



100 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



REPORT OF THE VETERANS' MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 



The first act of this committee was to add the dates of the most 
recent wars to the Memorial Tablet in front of the Library, just be- 
fore Memorial Day. This was done at a cost of $40.00. 

We have investigated the cost of a bronze tablet which would list 
the names of all who joined the armed forces from the Revolutionary 
War to the present time. Great difficulty exists in getting accurate 
records. It would be unfortunate to omit a single name or to have 
any extra names. Also, as this list would only include the names of 
those who actually joined the service from Lincoln, such a list would 
do no honor whatever to those who came to Lincoln during or after 
their service. 

For this reason, the committee believes that a suitable plaque 
doing honor to all those veterans who have at any time been residents 
of Lincoln, but without naming any, would in the fullest sense be in 
accord with the wishes of the town. The committee expects to can- 
vass the town on this point in the near future. 

At the same time, the committee feels that this plaque should be 
in the Town House, where it would be inside and on town-administered 
property. 

Two months should suffice to complete this project, once the 
nature of the Memorial has been defined. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Robert E. White, Chairman 
J. Lewis Cunningham 
Richard J. Eaton 



101 



L/ducahLon 
ani [Recreation 

BEMIS FREE LECTURES 



The Bemis Lecture Trustees are continuing to follow the policy of 
trying to present fewer lectures but maintaining the same standard 
and choosing a variety in order to appeal to all ages. The attend- 
ance this year has been excellent. 

In the spring we received with regret the resignation of our co- 
trustee, Mr. Leonard Larrabee, who is presently serving on another 
Town Committee. It is with great pleasure that we now have Mr. Paul 
Brooks appointed to fill in Mr. Larrabee 1 s unexpired term. 

We would like to reiterate once again that suggestions by the 
townspeople for this lecture series are always welcome. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Mabel H. Todd 
Paul Brooks 
Christopher W. Hurd 

Bemis Lecture Trustees 



102 



LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARI 

When the Library was given to the Town and dedicated on August 5, 
188^, it was provided that its continuance and control be in the care 
of a Board of Trustees, three of whom were appointed for life with 
the provision that in case of death or resignation of one his 
successor should be chosen by the remaining two. In addition, the 
Chairman of the Selectmen and the Chairman of the School Committee 
were designated as the fourth and fifth members. If any of the life 
members should hold either of the latter two offices, a substitute 
was to be appointed for him. This explanation of the constitution 
of the Board of Library Trustees is made that the many new residents 
of the Town, not knowing and having asked, may be informed. 

In the gift of the Library to the Town, the donor imposed only 
one restriction: "that it shall be used only for the purposes of a 
library and so managed as to secure the greatest benefit and pleasure 
to those who use it." 

The first books were issued December 20, 1884, and for the seventy- 
two years since the Library has been open; at first two days a week, 
and for the past five years three days a week. Contemplated is 
further opening time as the demand increases. 

In 1884 provision was made for 7,000 volumes with opportunity to 
increase by 7,000 more. This year nearly 16,000 volumes are crowded 
into the same space. The need for more shelf space is obvious if 
the Library is to meet the needs of the increasing population of the 
Town. 

The donor urged the great importance of collecting and preserving 
old records relating to the history of the Town and suggested the 
library as the proper custodian of such. The library has faithfully 
accepted this trust and the accumulation is now such that provision 
should be made for their safety from fire or theft by a bomb proof 
room or vault. The trustees hope that the building addition com- 
mittee will include such in their plans along with the other needs 
under consideration. 

The Library Building Committee, as provided at the Annual Town 
Meeting, was not appointed until early in the summer and because of 
vacations did not get organized until September. The trustees and 
librarian as ex-officio members have tried to collaborate with their 
ideas and suggestions so as to give them a true picture of the library 
needs. Progress has been slow but along constructive lines, and it 
is our hope that this committee will continue, so that eventually 
Lincoln Library may be of sufficient size and equipment to meet the 



103 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



needs of our growing Town for several years. 

Any building 72 years old is subject to ravages of the elements 
and to wear, and the repair item is to be considered yearly in its 
maintenance. The trustees have tried to anticipate such and usually 
have been successful. However, the severe storms of the past year 
resulted in damage to the roof and chimneys that required attention 
to replace copper valleys and slate on the roof and chimney flash- 
ings and repairs. 

Contemplated in 1957 are the pointing up of the masonry of the 
walls and steps and some exterior and interior painting. Estimates 
for these repairs have been obtained and the amounts included in the 
library budget for the year. 

Some increase in the salary item is asked to provide extra ser- 
vices of the assistant librarian. 

Minor increases requested are in line with increased cost of 
various necessities such as fuel. 

Two problems of special interest and concern to users of the 
library have been discussed by the trustees: The First should be of 
direct concern to parents, — the destruction and defacement of the 
building and grounds by children. The Second, — present parking 
regulations make it necessary for children and adults to cross Bed- 
ford Road to reach the library. A busy corner and several near 
accidents should warn library users to be alert and very careful. 
It has been suggested to the Selectmen that an effort be made to 
devise a safer arrangement, at least during the hours the library is 
open. 

Our ever faithful librarian, Mrs. Farrar, was incapacitated for 
several weeks during the year, but even during her illness had the 
welfare of the library on her mind and gave aid to her assistant, Mrs. 
Murphy, with directions and suggestions, so that the latter was able 
to keep things going very smoothly. We thank them both, and welcome 
Mrs. Farrar f s recovery and return. 

Many friends of the library have by deed, gift and suggestions 
shown their interest during the year. For such the trustees are very 
grateful and hope their interest will continue. 

The librarian's report follows this and it is suggested that the 
statistics given be studied and compared with those of previous years. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Alice G. Meriam John W. Carman 

Charles K. Fitts George G. Tarbell 

Roland C. Mackenzie, Chairman 

104 



LIBRAKT 



LINCOLN LIBRARY 

Open Monday, Wednesday and Saturday 

from three to nine p.m. 

Closed on legal holidays 



Statistics, 1956 

Number of volumes, January 1, 1956 15,654 

Number of volumes added by gift 148 

Number of volumes purchased 477 

Number of volumes withdrawn 420 

Number of volumes, December 31, 1956 15,859 

Number of borrowers, December 31, 1956 1,182 

Number of days open 150 

Amount of fines collected $467.00 



Circulation 

Fiction 7,460 

Non-Fiction 3,778 

Juvenile 10,691 

Periodicals 1,344 

Total 23,273 



105 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



List of Donors to the Library in 1956 



Mr. David L. Ammen 
Mrs. Iawrence B. Anderson 
Mrs. Virginia G. Armstrong 
Mr. Charles H. Blake 
Mrs. Charles A. Bliss 
Mrs. Secor D. Browne 
Mrs. Thomas J. Carney 
Concord Book Shop 
Mrs. Robert L. DeNormandie 
Mrs. Alfred W. Douglass 
Filene Foundation 
Miss Olive B. Floyd 
Mrs. Norman W. Fradd 
Miss Jane Gammons 
Miss Doris Grason 
Miss Jay Healey 



Mrs. Stanley Heck 

Miss Jodie Henderson 

Mr. A. Henry Higginson 

Mrs. Pearson Hunt 

Mr. Charles P. Kindleberger 

Mrs. William T. King 

Mrs. Lawson 

Mr. David W. Mann 

Miss Dorothy Millar 

Miss Hazel H. Newton 

Mrs. Sumner Smith 

Mrs. Arthur E. Thiessen 

Mrs. Eveleth R. Todd 

Mrs. Quincy W. Wales 

Mrs. G. H. Weston 



106 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



THE MIDDLESEX COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE 

In Middlesex County the Extension Service supplies citizens with 
information on agriculture, home-making, and U-R Club work from the 
County Extension Service office. Residents can obtain up to date 
practical information applied directly to local conditions and relating 
to almost any phase of rural living. 

The Extension Service is a co-operative institution. Middlesex 
County provides its major financial support. The Federal government 
supplies services and additional funds through the Massachusetts Ex- 
tension Service whose headquarters are at the University of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Program and Services 

The County Extension Service is the headquarters for a wide variety 
of educational programs and services. Farmers attend Extension meet- 
ings on subjects in production and marketing; home-makers learn how to 
save time and money to make their homes pleasant and attractive; boys 
and girls all over the county are members of 4-H Clubs. County Ex- 
tension workers strive to supply knowledge that citizens can use in 
their daily living. Through the application of this knowledge farmers 
can maintain their economy, their children will grow up to be responsi- 
ble citizens and their homes and communities will be pleasant places 
in which to live. 

Extension Teaching Includes 

Producing Massachusetts crops and livestock; market information 
and techniques; health; safety and fire prevention; convenient, attrac- 
tive homes and farm buildings; home and community recreation; child 
development and family life; nutrition and food preservation; farm 
and fami l y finance; clothing; conservation of soil and water; under- 
standing of public problems; information to consumers. 

Helps People Help Themselves 

Extension supplies helpful information to farmers and homemakers. 
It promotes educational programs which local people recommend and 
sponsor. It provides opportunity for training and for study. Its 1 
staff advises individuals and groups in the application of technical 
facts to specific situations. 

The Extension Service, however, does not provide materials or 
services to individuals or groups. Its effort is to help people help 
themselves, to encourage individuals and groups to take advantage of 
opportunities. Its 1 workers are skilled in organization. They give 



107 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



encouragement, information, and support to rural leaders so that 
promising programs may result in worthwhile accomplishments. 

Educational Methods Used 

In Middlesex County, consisting of 54- towns and cities in which 
more than one million people reside, it becomes necessary for the 
Extension Service staff to rely heavily upon methods that will cover 
this heavily populated county. Mailing lists, news articles, month- 
ly publications, circular letters, radio and television are some of 
the methods used. In addition, a host of bulletins on almost any 
subject related to the problems of the farm and home are available 
upon request. Opportunity is provided for people to meet in organized 
groups on many special subjects. 

People Determine Own Programs 

Local people have a major voice in determining Extension Service 
programs through committees and leaders. Programs are developed to 
meet local needs. Volunteer leaders have a prominent role in 4-H 
Club work and Home Economics. These local leaders organize clubs, 
and they are responsible for developing our future citizens in an 
atmosphere of pleasant family living. With a strong well informed 
leadership, families can face future problems with confidence. 

The County Extension is backed by the University of Massachusetts 
in supplying the facts of research. Extension specialists from the 
University assist County Extension workers with specialized teaching. 

Organization 

Middlesex County has a group of nine trustees appointed by the 
County Commissioners who are directly responsible for the administra- 
tion of the County Extension Service. The County Extension Service 
is part of a nation-wide organization on a co-operative relationship 
between Federal, State and County government. The purpose of Ex- 
tension Service is to place additional opportunities before people so 
that they may improve their economic and physical well-being and 
realize to,. the fullest the satisfactions, contentments, and pleasures 
of life. 

All residents of Middlesex County are entitled to participate in 
the programs of the Extension Service. Inquiries for information 
and assistance should be directed to Middlesex County Extension Ser- 
vice, 19 Everett Street, Concord, Massachusetts. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Robert D. Donaldson 
Town Director 

108 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 



LINCOLN RECREATION COMMITTEE 



The Summer Playground celebrated its fifteenth year with a large 
attendance and a program of outdoor and indoor activities lasting 
eight weeks. 

With Mario Moriello as supervisor, Helen Gradeski as instructor 
of handicraft, Judith Sherman and Stephen Murphy as junior instruc- 
tors, a program of basketball, tennis, Softball, baseball, croquet, 
horseshoe pitching, ping-pong and handicraft was offered to boys 
and girls of elementary school age. An added attraction was tennis 
instruction by a professional once a week. 

The generous use of the Smith School facilities as a part of our 
program was very helpful and greatly appreciated. 

A successful adult tennis tournament was held on weekends during 
September and October. Plans are under way for a similar event for 
juniors next year. 

The winter program of badminton on Tuesday evenings and basket- 
ball on Saturday afternoons continues to attract both adults and 
young people. 

The Committee wishes to express its appreciation to Ann Donaldson 
and Melanie ! Reilly for their excellent supervision of the younger 
children during the first two weeks of the summer playground; and to 
Edward Rooney who acted as supervisor for the first ten days of the 
program. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Albert Avery 
John M. Barnaby 
Astrid Donaldson 
John Garrison 
Ernest Johnson 
Roland Robbins 
Edward D. Rooney 
Sadie Sherman 
Ethan Murphy, Chairman 



109 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Report of the Directors 
for the year 1956 



The DeCordova Museum has again this year provided the Town and 
Museum visitors with a lively, instructive series of exhibitions, 
the scope and breadth of which indicate the Museum's varied in- 
terests. Events which range from family fare ("The Festival of 
the Oregon Trail") to topics for specialized interests (Walter 
Gropius 1 lecture, "Architecture of Japan") demonstrate that frolic 
and philosophy are both vital parts of the Museum program. We hope 
that the DeCordova Museum will continue to be a social and cultural 
force and that coamunity benefits will continue to be reflected in 
increased Associate support. 

We have reported over the years that the need for expansion 
exists. The problem does not diminish with time and, during the 
past year, extensive study and research has been undertaken by the 
Board of Directors. The need is apparent but no conclusions have 
been reached. 

We wish to express thanks to the hard-working volunteers whose 
efforts lend distinction to special Museum events, appreciation to 
those whose annual contributions make the ever -expanding program 
possible, and finally to the staff, thanks for the record of 1956 — 
it speaks for itself. 

Respectfully submitted: 

John Quincy Adams, President 
Charles H. Blake, Vice-President 
Arthur Thiessen, Treasurer 
Elizabeth J. Snelling, Clerk 
Polly F. Brown 
Stanley Heck 
William N. Swift 



110 



DeCQRDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



Report of the Executive Director 
for the year 1956 

The Museum enjoyed another year of extremely successful operation, 
The detailed accounts below provide a review and summary of exhibi- 
tions, events and class activity. I wish to thank the staff and 
the volunteers who contributed immeasurably to the success we have 
enjoyed, and as always, gratitude to the Board of Directors for 
their constant devotion to the ideals of the DeCordova Museum. 



EXHIBITIONS 

Work by contemporary artists from every section of the U. S. and 
from such far-flung parts of the world as Holland, Japan, Canada, 
France and Ireland lent a decidedly cosmopolitan flavor to the 
Museum's exhibition program in 1956. The media shown fell largely 
into the major categories of painting, prints, photography, ceramics 
and sculpture. Consistent with Museum policy, the exhibitions were 
devoted entirely to contemporary art but encompassed a variety of 
styles ranging from the traditionally pictorial to "non-objective 11 . 
Although some of the participating artists had already achieved 
national or international prominence, many of these exhibits intro- 
duced promising younger talents to the public for the first time. 

January 22 - J. W. S. COX, watercolors 

January 22 - ROS & HARRIS BARRON, mosaics, ceramics 

January 22 - NICHOLAS DE STAEL, paintings 

March 11 - ARTISTS AT LIBERTY, paintings by New England 

artists 

March k - LOIS TARLCW, paintings, drawings 

March U - ZIPORA SCHREIBER, MART SHORE, GEORGE MERCER, 

paintings 

April 3 - LAURENCE SISSON, watercolors 

April 15 - POTTERI FROM VALIAURIS 

April 18 - PAINTINGS FROM THE WILLARD GALLERI 

April 22 - BOSTON PRINTMAKERS SHOW 

May 13 - INOKUMA, paintings 

May 13 - JUIES AARONS, photographs 

May 20 - HELEN BAKER, watercolors 

May 27 - DeCORDOVA CRAFTSMEN 3RD ANNUAL EXHIBIT 

June 17 - DUTCH ARTS AND CRAFTS 

June 17 - CANADIAN WATERCOLORS 

June 17 - VERNER REED, PATRICIA BLAINE, photographs 

September 9 - THE POSTER AND MODERN PAINTING 

November 11 - RICHARD WAGNER, paintings 

October 21 - ANNE WALKER, prints 



111 



EIXJCATION AND RECREATION 



November 18 - WILLIAM WYMAN, pottery 

December 5 - 10TH ANNUAL PRINT EXHIBIT OF THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM 
December 5 - JOHN AIKEN, watercolors 

December 9 - CARNEGIE INSTITUTE PRESENTS, paintings by 14 

Pittsburgh artists 

CUSSES 

At the close of 1956, 338 adults were enrolled in 2U different 
classes and 230 children were enrolled in 15 classes. In addition 
to the usual curriculum, there were new classes in enamelling and 
mosaics which drew an immediate and enthusiastic response. Modern 
Dance for Adults, instituted on a trial basis last winter, appears 
now to have won a permanent place among the most popular of adult 
classes. 

EVENTS 

The day-long "Festival of the Oregon Trail* and the elegant 
"Arts & Letters Ball" were perhaps the most spectacular in a 
succession of special events which supplemented Museum exhibitions 
and classes in 1956. Presenting eleven feature films, the Museum's 
film series continued to find favor with a steadily growing audience, 
Among several memorable music programs, three open rehearsals for 
orchestra and chorus, conducted by Anton Winkler, were of unusual 
interest. In 1956, again, the Children's Concert by the Concord 
orchestra drew a capacity audience of attentive youngsters and 
parents. On December 9, the Boston lyric Theatre brought "Amahl 
and the Night Visitors" to Lincoln in a distinguished performance 
sponsored by the Museum at the Smith School. And, appropriately 
closing the 1956 season, the Belmont Chorus' beautiful Christmas 
Concert became a Christmas party, complete with Concert, carols and 
wassail. 

March 11 ~ WALTER GROPIUS LECTURE, "Architecture of Japan" 

March U - ORCHESTRA -CHORUS OPEN REHEARSAL 

March 23 - NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY ALUMNI CHORUS, concert 

March 15,16,17 - THE GLASS MENAGERIE, DeCordova Theater Workshop 

April 15 - POTTERI FROM VALLAURIS, lecture by Clair Batigne 

May U - IEXINGTON MUSIC CLUB, concert 

May 11 - ARTS AND LETTERS COSTUME BALL 

toy 25 - MORNING CHORALE, concert 

May 26 - CRAFTS AROUND THE WORLD, lecture by Dana P. 

Vaughan 

June 2 - FESTIVAL OF THE OREGON TRAIL 

June 10 - ORCHESTRA-CHORUS OPEN REHEARSAL 

October 7 - ORCHESTRA -CHORUS OPEN REHEARSAL 

November 16 - RICHARD WAGNER, lecture 



112 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



November 18 - CHILDREN f S CONCERT, CONCORD ORCHESTRA 

December 8 - AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS, Boston Lyric Theatre 

December 16 - BELMONT CHORUS CHRISTMAS CONCERT 

ASSOCIATES 

As the Museum grows, it becomes increasingly dependent on the 
support of its Associate members. In 1956 the number of Associates 
increased by 116 to stand at 735 on December 31. 

To coordinate the many volunteer services rendered by Associates, 
an Associate Council was formed in 1956. The Council includes the 
Chairmen of all major volunteer projects and representatives from 
Concord, Lexington, Lincoln, Sudbury, Way land and Weston. An 
ASSOCIATE NEWSLETTER was instituted in December to be issued monthly 
and to provide Associates with a current report of Museum activities 
and a monthly calendar of events. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Frederick P. Walkey 

Executive Director 



113 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
OPERATING STATEMENT, 1956 

OPERATING INCOME 

From DeCordova Trusts $51,753.64- 

Dues of Associates 5,919.20 

Contributions of Visitors 350.33 
School Tuition 

Adults $13,431.97 

Children 6,993.35 20,475.32 

Sale of School Supplies & Books 3,471.42 

Admissions (concerts, dance, festival) 8,857.76 
Miscellaneous 

(sale of firewood, services) 1«357.93 

Total Operating Income $92,185.60 

OPERATING EXPENSE 

Salaries, Administrative 28,904-77 

School Expense 

Adult Classes: Salaries, $11,228. 24- 
Supplies l t 746.40 

12,974.64 
Child Classes: Salaries 6,266.51 

Supplies 744.60 7,011.11 

Supplies, Maintenance 4, 523. 84 

Fuel, Utilities 4,525.55 

Insurance, Taxes 2,817.86 

Repayment of Loan 4,666.40 

Exhibitions 2,177.79 

Events (concerts, dance, festival) 6,405.47 

Subscriptions 187.40 

Publications, mailing 4,818.25 

Equipment 1,932.93 

Cottage 1,128.83 

Grounds Maintenance 533.97 

Books, supplies purchased for resale 3,485.70 

Purchase of works of art 485.00 
Miscellaneous 

(includes Fund Raising Survey) 3,567.10 

Total Operating Expense $ 90,146.61 

Operating Reserve $ 2,038.99 



114 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP TRUST FUND 



The March, 1956, Town Meeting voted to accept the Instrument of 
Trust and the Lincoln School Association gift of $1,000 for the 
establishment of a Lincoln Permanent Scholarship Fund. The Com- 
missioners of Trust Funds will manage the funds, a committee of 
three members, one each to be appointed annually by the Town Modera- 
tor, the Chairman of the School Committee, and the Regional High 
School Committee, will administer the awards. 

Lincoln high school seniors, or graduates, desiring further 
education or specialized training are eligible. Awards will be 
made on the basis of good citizenship, scholarship, and financial 
need. 

The creation of a permanent fund provides the opportunity for 
public spirited donors to aid deserving students to achieve their 
educational goals. 

The administrative committee is very grateful to those who have 
already contributed generously, and is happy to receive gifts or 
bequests from interested individuals or organizations. 

It is hoped that, although the beginning is modest, the fund 
will soon grow, by the generosity of Lincoln, to become an established 
aid to promising students. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Douglass B. Roberts, Ex Officio Member 
Alice E. Garrison 
Malcolm D. Donaldson 
Barbara G. Davis, Chairman 



115 



School Uommitt 



ee 



Jveport 



to the 



Cown of bLncoln 




FOR THE SCHOOL IEAR 1955-1956 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 1957-1958 



September 


2 


Monday 




3-6 


Tuesday -Friday 




9 


Monday 


November 


11-15 


Monday -Friday 




11 


Monday 


• 


28-29 


Thursday -Friday 


December 


20 


Friday 


January 


2 


Thursday 


February- 


H 


Friday 




2U 


Monday 


March 


21 


Friday 


April 


11 


Friday 




21 


Monday 


May- 


30 


Friday 


June 


13 


Friday 




13 


Friday 




16-20 


Monday-Friday 



Labor Day 

Staff Organization and Workshop 

School Opens 

Education Week 

Veterans Day Recess 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Christmas Vacation, Closing 

School Resumes 

Winter Vacation, Closing 

School Resumes 

Teachers 1 Visiting Day 

Spring Vacation, Closing 

School Resumes 

Memorial Day Recess 

Summer Vacation, Closing 

Commencement 

Staff Workshop 



Additional Calendar Data 

It is planned to continue the policy of no school on Wednesdays 
for the first grade until the Christmas Vacation with the exception 
of November 13 and November 27. 

Kindergarten morning and afternoon sessions will reverse on 
January 27, 1958. 

Staff Meeting Half Days will be the second Wednesday of each 
month except September, December and June. 



116 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



ORGANIZATION 



Term 
Expires 

John W. Carman, Chairman 1959 

(Mrs.) Elizabeth Donaldson 1957 

Ernest P. Neumann 1958 

Meetings: Regular: First Tuesday of each month: 7:30 P. M. 

at the Superintendent's Office. CI. 9-8172 

Called: Third Tuesday of each month usually and 
other meetings as stated; time and place 
designated. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Douglass B. Roberts, Lincoln Road, CI. 9-8760 
Office at Smith School, CI. 9-8172 

SECRETARY TO SUPERINTENDENT 

Solvay G. Valentine 

BUILDING PRINCIPALS 

Robert B. Patch 

Smith School, CI. 9-8333 



Louis J. Sapienza 
Center School, CI. 9-8^62 

CIERKS 
(Mrs.) Clara E. Powers, Smith School 
(Mrs.) Elizabeth J. Kane, Center School 

CUSTODIANS 

Harold Cuttell, Smith School 

Frederick Murphy, Smith School 

Robert J. Hartel, Center School 

OFFICE HOURS 

School Days . . 8:30 A. M. to U P. M. 
School Vacation . . 9 A. M. to k P. M. 



117 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



No -School Signals 



Local signals will be given on our fire alarm system: 

7:15 A. M. 3„3—3 repeated at 
7:30 A. M. 3-3—3 



Radio station announcements will be read between the period 
of 6:30 and 7:30 A. M. On stormy mornings, if convenient, tune 
in on two or more stations since it is not always possible to get 
messages through to several stations in the brief time allotted us, 
Please refrain, too, from tying up local phone lines to school 
officials and bus operators during the morning hour, 6:30 - 7:30. 
We try to contact all of the following when it is necessary to 
announce "No School": 

WBZ 103QK WHDH ......... 850K 

WEEI 590K WNAC 680K 

Announcements regarding "No School" are made by the Lincoln 
Superintendent for the Lincoln Elementary Schools (Grades K-8) 
only. 

Announcements for the Regional High School and Lincoln pupils 
in Concord and Weston High Schools are made by the Regional Super- 
intendent and will be designated "Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High 
School". 

Pupils should listen for the announcement which concerns them 
as there will be times when the High School will operate even 
though the Elementary Schools are closed. 

During extremely stormy or cold weather, parents are urged 
to exercise their own judgment in sending the younger children. 



118 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



During the past year the School Committee's time has been largely 
devoted to routine matters. 

There has been a marked increase in the use of school buildings 
for community purposes. For meetings, dramatics, and recreational 
use of the gym for badminton, basketball, etc. by adults and teen- 
agers, and an adult woodworking class, the school buildings were used 
on a total of 206 days out of the year for other than school activi- 
ties. It is indeed gratifying that these facilities are used more 
than simply for school purposes. 

During the year the School Committee, after consultation with the 
Selectmen, advised Hanscom Air Base that Lincoln would be unable to 
provide a school building for the children of families on the proposed 
on-base housing development. Recently Hanscom Air Base has requested 
that Lincoln assume operation of the school in a building to be 
erected by the U. S. Government. This question is being considered 
with particular emphasis on the reimbursement provisions of the law 
and the legal aspects of the operating agreements. There is an 
article in the Warrant under which the Town may act on this question. 

The Committee has also been working closely with the Building 
Committee on our own developing school needs. Based on the rate of 
growth of the town it appears that the school will, on the average, 
grow by two classes per year with a third class possible about every 
three years. 

Lincoln as a community provides better than average financial 
support for its schools both from the point of plant facilities and 
for operation. Operational cost figures indicate that for each 
new classroom which goes into operation something over $7,000 is 
added to the budget. This sum covers teachers 1 salaries, adminis- 
tration, fuel, utilities, supplies, transportation, etc., but 
nothing toward retirement of construction bonds. This rough rule 
of thumb will serve to show the costs involved as more and more class- 
rooms become occupied in the proposed new building. 

The summer employment of about 1/3 of the staff on a planning 
and development project was very successful and it is planned to 
continue this on a somewhat expanded basis. 



119 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



The Committee wishes to express its appreciation to the staff, 
the L. S. A. , and those citizens who spent so many hours bringing 
accurately up to date the census of school age children. 

Respectfully submitted: 

John W. Carman, Chairman 
Elizabeth Donaldson 
Ernest P. Neumann 

Lincoln School Committee 



120 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

A steadily growing population is resulting in an expanding school 
system. Both the growth of the town and the effects of the larger 
birth rates in the 1950* s are creating school needs that are being 
met by immediate action and plans for future action. The eighth 
grade graduating class in 1956 was the last of a group of classes 
averaging less than forty pupils each, the present classes in grades 
1 to 8 average about 70 each. A census of pre-school children in 
April indicates that the present Kindergarten is the first of a 
group of classes that will average over 100 each. 

On the initiative of the School Committee a Building Needs Com- 
mittee was authorized at the annual Town Meeting in March. In 
co-operation with the School Committee and the school administration 
this committee has intensively studied the needs of the school for 
the next eight to ten years. In December, on recommendation of the 
Committee, the purchase of a new school site adjacent to the ball 
field was authorized and plans for the first section of a proposed 
new primary school, which will eventually consist of approximately 
twenty classrooms, multipurpose room, and auxiliary spaces, are now 
being drawn. 

In June, when it became apparent that the September enrollment 
would require additional space, it was decided to reopen South School 
to house four kindergarten classes and to employ an additional teacher 
at the fourth grade level as well as at kindergarten. These additions 
plus the services of a teacher in Music and one in Physical Education, 
who were employed jointly by Lincoln and Sudbury on a /&%-6C$> basis, 
completed the staff expansion during 1956. Other personnel changes 
during the year resulted from resignations and retirements. Mrs. 
Marion Howard retired from public school teaching, three others moved 
from this area with their husbands, and two accepted other employment. 

The impact of Federal activity has been increasingly felt during 
1956. Close contact with the Board of Selectmen, Air Force personnel, 
and the U. S. Office of Health, Education and Welfare has been main- 
tained in a continuous appraisal of the developing effect of the 
Hanscom Field "on-base 11 housing on the Town and the school. In 
July it was found to be impossible to comply with a request of the 
Air Force to build a school, and presently there is before the School 
Committee a request to operate the school as a part of the Lincoln 
system. An intensive investigation of the responsibilities, 
desirabilities, and risks involved in the requested action is now 
underway. It is expected that a recommendation in this regard will 
be made not later than the annual meeting. 



121 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



During the course of the conferences concerning "on-base" housing, 
it was indicated that Lincoln might be eligible for Federal Aid under 
Public Law 874 because of federally connected children already in our 
schools. A survey on November 1, 1956, confirmed that for the first 
time Lincoln is eligible. Application has been made for aid which 
is expected to be approximately $6500. 

On July 1, the new personnel and salary policy, which had been 
developed by the co-operative efforts of the staff and the School 
Committee, went into effect. Under the salary provisions of the 
policy, which is built around the principle of competence in perform- 
ing the teaching job as the basis for salary determination, the 
average salary of teaching personnel during the school year 1956-57 
is $4137. (Estimates published by the Massachusetts Teachers 
Association indicate a state wide average salary of $4400) . The 
range of teaching salaries in Lincoln is presently from $3350 to 
$5600. 

In accordance with the policy concerning full year employment 
described in the previous annual report, ten teachers worked for a 
period of six weeks after the closing of school. This group worked 
on a project to strengthen and broaden the reading program. Their 
summer activities resulted in a successful means of pooling the 
resources of all the teachers. Specific lesson exercises, techniquesj 
and materials have been shared by individual staff members, and each 
individual has been thus able to integrate his efforts with those of 
the staff as a whole. Budgetary provisions have been made for ex- 
panding this group to seventeen during 1957. 

In June, the Lincoln and Sudbury eighth grades completed their 
work at Smith School. Since all these pupils were in one school and 
were to enter the Regional High School, the Lincoln staff was able to 
give more assistance in planning the Freshman program of study and in 
orientation to High School than had been possible in previous years. 
The eighth grade guidance teachers worked closely with the High School 
Guidance Director as well as with pupils and parents in this endeavor. 
Since September these teachers and the Guidance Director have been 
engaged in a program of short and long term educational planning. 
A revision in the curriculum has been made placing the study of 
Geography and World History in separate years in order to insure 
better instruction in both subjects. Plans are also being made in 
co-operation with the High School district for the teaching of Algebra 
I in grade eight to some of our more advanced pupils, which will allow 
these pupils wider opportunities in subject choices during their 
secondary school years. 

In September a program of "on-the-job" teacher training was 
instituted involving both our regularly employed but inexperienced 



122 



SUPERIMTENTENT OF SCHOOLS 

teachers and, in cooperation with Wheelock College, a group of under- 
graduate teachers. In this latter group have been four Juniors and 
one Senior who have come to Lincoln several days a week to participate 
in our school program. Besides helping to prepare young people for 
teaching careers our own school has benefited from the concrete help 
and stimulation that the young ladies have given. Also, ty utilizing 
the resources of our experienced teachers it has been possible to 
arrange the opportunity for inter-class observations and numerous con- 
ferences between them and the inexperienced teachers who are regularly 
employed. 

During the year, the testing program has undergone a periodic and 
careful evaluation accompanied by a critical analysis of results that 
have been recorded in the last six years of full scale testing. The 
whole program includes a reading readiness test in kindergarten, an 
individual test (Binet) of I. Q. at the end of grade 1, two group 
tests of I. Q. at intervals during the elementary school years, a 
complete battery of achievement tests at the end of each year, and a 
supplementary test of basic study skills at the upper grade level. 
Considerably more diagnostic testing is being done in the Fall than 
has been done in the past and it is expected that concentration on 
weaknesses uncovered in this way will result in better performance 
during the year and be reflected in the results of the annual achieve- 
ment test. 

The analysis of six years of full scale achievement testing with 
the same battery of test (California) reveals several pertinent facts. 
Ten percent more pupils show achievement in the top tenth of their 
age group in the country and nine percent fewer students are now doing 
work below an acceptable standard at their grade level as compared to 
1951. The percent of our pupils at various achievement levels in 
the two years is also indicative of improved instruction. 

Lincoln Pupils 
in 1951 in 1956 

below national average 76 or 22% 5U or 13% 

above national average 252 or 78% 389 or 87% 

in top fourth in country 166 or 52% 291 or 65% 

in top tenth in country 66 or 20$ 131 or 30% 

While the national average achievement of all pupils is at the 
50th percentile, according to the abilities of Lincoln pupils, it 
would be expected that the average achievement in Lincoln would be at 
the 70th percentile nationally, whereas actual average achievement 
was at the 76th percentile and half of our pupils achieved higher 
scores than 83% of all children in the country at their age level. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Douglass B. Roberts 
Superintendent of Schools 
123 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

SCHOOL NURSE'S REPORT 
To the School Committee: 

A report of school nursing for the year ending December 31, 1956, 
is hereby submitted. 

Schools have been visited daily. There have been U5U office 
calls for treatment or advice; 53 pupils were taken home; 362 home 
calls to check on absentees. 

Pupils have been weighed and measured twice and scalps examined. 

Children entering Kindergarten, and others new to the first grade, 
were requested to have a physical examination. Examinations were 
done by Dr. John A. V. Davie s at the Well Child Conference or their 
family physician. All but two had their physical, and with these 
two religious objection was the reason. Among the Kindergarten 
group 21 were vaccinated, 19 received Triple Antigen, and 2U a 
"Booster". 

Audiometer tests were given with four showing defective hearing in 
one or both ears; all are under observation by their family physician 
or Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. 

Vision testing showed five pupils with defective sight; all are 
now wearing glasses. 

Five pupils were taken to Middlesex Sanatorium for Chest X-Rays; 
18 school personnel had X-Rays, all negative. 

Parents responded 92$ to the school request for Family Physician 
examination of their child, if in 3rd or 6th grade. 

I assisted Dr. Farrell with oral examination of each child and with 
dental clinic two half days a week. Dr. Farrell gave three oral 
talks to pupils in grades 1-3-5. 

Many interviews were held between teacher and nurse with a better 
understanding of the pupil resulting. 

I attended health Institutes held in Boston, Waltham, Arlington 
and Cambridge, all very helpful to school nursing. 

There were 17 cases measles; 11 cases of chicken pox; 9 cases of 
mumps. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marian N. Ober, R. N. , School Nurse 

124 



SCHOOL CENSUS 



SCHOOL CENSUS 



Distribution of Minors 5 years or over 7 years or over 
by Age and Sex and under 7 and under 16 

October 1, 1955 

316 

305 

621 



1. 


Boys 




2. 


Girls 


69 




Totals 


159 


B . Distribution 




1. 


In public day school 


152 


2. 


In private school 


6 


3. 


Not enrolled in schools 


1 


u. 


Special -Elementary 
Totals 



159 



527 

93 



1 

621 



125 



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EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



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126 



EDUCATION AMD RECREATION 



PER PUFIL COSTS - 1956 



1. Population of Town (1955 Census) 

2. Average School Membership 

3. Equalized Valuation, per pupil 

4. Operating Expenditures for Schools 

5. Receipts Accredited to Schools 

6. Net Expenditures from Local Taxation 

7. Expenditures per pupil 

8. Per Pupil Net Expenditures from Local Taxation 

9. Receipts per Pupil 



10. Transportation 

Number of Pupils 
Mileage 
Expenditures 
Expenditures 
per pupil 



Elementary High School 

5^5 101# 

39,053 H,234 

$ 20,754.37 $ 5,396.73 



2,949 

690 

8,502.90 

243,939.52 

60,949.00* 

182,990.52* 

353.53 

265.20* 

88.33* 

Total 

53,287 
% 26,151.10 



I 



32.18 $ 53.43 



% 



35.06 



* Based on estimated receipts 

# This number is the number transported January -June 1956. 



127 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES AND PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1957 



Expended 1955 Expended 1956 Proposed 1957 

I. General Control: 

Salaries $ H, 665. 80 $ 11,600.00 $ 12,810.00 

Other Expenses 1,682.05 1,679.69 2,175.00 

II. Instruction: 

Salaries 106,317.06 141,470.31 157,415.00 

Other Expenses 11,771.96 12,013.38 15, HO. 00 

III. Operation: 

Salaries 8,864.27 8,909.24 10,816.00 

Fuel 7,378.46 8,588.52 9,450.00 

Other Expenses 5,510.60 6,497.40 6,790.00 

IV. Maintenance 

Repairs & Upkeep 5,953.83 3,911.94 7,988.00 

V. Auxiliary Agencies 

Health 1,013.70 1,327.72 1, 360.00 

Transportation 26,433.45 26,151.10* 23,650.00 

Tuition 31,416.29 18,866.25* 550. 00# 

Other Expenses 244.49 373.57 505.00 

VI. Vocational 1,270.68 1,118.92 .00 

VII. New Equipment 1,285.12 1,431.48 1,920.00 
Totals $ 223,807.76 $ 243,939.52 $ 250,569.00 



* Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School assumed expenses for 
High School Pupils as of September 1, 1956 

# Special Class 



128 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



GRADUATED IN JUNE, 1956 
GRADE VIII 



Peter Boylston Adams 
Donna M. Algeo 
Carolyn Angelo 
Douglas Raymond Ashworth 
Frederick V. B. Baltrush 
Bruce W. Bergen 
Gail Evelyn Brisson 
Donald Richard Chausse' 
Penelope Hall Chellis 
Elizabeth R. Ciraso 
Rocco D. Ciraso 
Joseph D. Cotoni, Jr. 
Sara Seward Crane 
George Benjamin Cunningham 
Susan Bradford Davis 
Daniel L. Donaldson 
Daniel T. Fitzgerald 
James M. Giurleo, Jr. 
Jeffrey Evans Gray 
Edmund Medford Huntley 

Steven Wood 



DeWitt John, Jr. 
Richard Stockton Kindleberger 
Martha Livengood 
Kevin John Lyons 
Joan Spence Maclaurin 
Sheila Maclaurin 
Charles Eliot McClennen 
Alvin H. Neary, Jr. 
Barbara Anne Neumann 
Anne Elizabeth Norton 
Kathleen Mary Panetta 
Peter Norman Richard 
Judith Rodimon 
Louise H. Rogers 
Nancy Jean Rooney 
Sandra Eleanor Seeckts 
Alanson H. Sturgis, III 
Sarah Curtis Tarbell 
Pauline Eveleth Todd 
Thomas John Williamson, Jr. 
Ziegler 



CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL 



Barry Andrews 
Dawn Broderick 
Barbara Campobasso 
Charles Campobasso 
Valerie Clark 
Allen Dougherty 



Sandra Forbes 
George Gordon 
Murray Mills 
Francis Smith 
Frances Sullivan 
Katherine Van Leer 



Judith Anderson 
Andra Cowles 
Edward Denton 



WESTON HIGH SCHOOL 



David Donaldson 
Adam Grade ski 
William Rollins 



Allen Dougherty 
Barry Andrews 
Judith Anderson 



HONORS 

Scholarship to Brandeis University 

Lincoln Scholarship 

National Honor Society, 2nd Honors 



129 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



STA 


FF ROSTER - JANUARY 


1, 1957 




Name 


Position 


Training Appointed 


Douglass B. Roberts 


Super intendent 
of Schools 


Tufts College, 
B.S., M. A. 
Harvard, Ed.D. 


1953 


Robert B. Patch 


Principal 
Smith School 


State Teachers 1 
College, Fitchburg 
B.S. Ed. - 
B. U. - Ed. M. 


1952 


Louis J. Sapienza 


Principal 
Center School 


Boston University 
B. S. Ed. 


1950 


Phyllis Johnson 


Grade One 


Lesley College, 

B. S. Ed. 


1946 


Augusta F. Sisk 


Remedial & 
Testing 


Boston University 
B. S. Ed., Ed.M. 


1946 


Ann G. Paranya 


Language Arts 


S.T. C. Montclair, 
N. J., A. B. 


1949 


Irma Antonangeli 


Grade Four 


Fitchburg S.T.C. 
B. S. Ed. - 
B. U., Ed.M. 


1950 


Hazel Flagg 


Grade Five 


Sargent 


1951 


Miriam Zartarian 


Art 


Tufts College, 
B.S. Ed., Ed.M. 


1951 


Joan B. Warren 


Kindergarten 


Boston University 
B.S. Ed., Ed.M. 


1951 


Jane L. Brown 


Grade Two 


Boston University 
B.S. in Elem. Ed. 


1953 


Albert S. Reed 


Physical 
Education 


Springfield College 
B. S., Ed.M. 


1953 


George Drake 


Shop 


Univ. of Washington, 
A. B. 


1954 


Robert A. Leach 


Social Studies 


Univ. of Alabama, 
A.B. - Ed.M., Univ. 
of Vermont 


1954 



130 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Name 


Position 


Training Appointed 


Harry T. Burke 


Social Studies 


Univ. of So.Cal. 

B.S. Ed., - 

B. U., M. S. E. 


1955 


Winona Church 


Grade One 


Univ. of Michigan 
A. B. Ed. 


1955 


Mary Helen Doherty 


Grade Five 


Wellesley College 
B. A. - 
Harvard, Ed. M. 


1955 


Julia Cole 


Grade Three 


Salem T. C. 


1955 


Elizabeth Derby 


Music 


Univ. of Cincinnati 
B. S. Ed. 

Cincinnati Conser- 
vatory, B. M. 


1955 


Jerome R. Derwallis 


Social Studies 


R. I. School of 
Design, B. F. A. 


1955 


Timothy Rhodes 


Mathematics 


Harvard, A. B. 


1955 


Mary Salvucci 


Home Arts 


Nasson College, 
B. S. 


1955 


Janice Simons 


Grade Five 


Russell Sage 
College, B.A. 
Oneonta S.T.C. , 
M. S. 


1955 


Dene Ulin 


Grade Two 


Conn. College for 
Women, A. B. 


1955 


Amy Volk 


Kindergarten 


Wheelock College, 
B. S. Ed. 


1955 


Joseph B. Herlihy 


Science 


Boston College, 
A. B., M. A. 


1956 


Mary Beard 


Grade Four 


Smith College, B.A. 
Harvard, Ed. M. 


1956 


Martha Bucknell 


Grade Two 


Swarthmore College, 


1956 



B. A., Harvard, Ed.M, 



131 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Name 


Position 


Training 


Appointed 


Maxine Dolan 


Kindergarten 


Kansas S.T.C., 

B. S. 


1956 


Mary R. Duplisea 


Grade Three 


Wheelock College, 
B. S. Ed. 


1956 


Amy Frye 


Grade One 


Wheelock College, 
B. S. Ed. 


1956 


Diane Furber 


Grade Four 


Tufts College, A.B 


. 1956 


Elizabeth Grimm 


Grade Four 


Wheelock College, 
B. S. Ed. 


1956 


Florence Justice 


Mathematics 


New Brunswick T.C. 


1956 


Barbara Noonkester 


Physical 
Education 


Wilson T. C., 
B. S. Ed. 


1956 


Olive Smith 


Music 


Univ. of Vermont, 
B. S. in Music Ed. 


1956 



132 



REGIONAL 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

REPORT 

to the 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1955-1956 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1957 



School reopens 
Winter Vacation 
Spring Vacation 
Memorial Day 
School closes 
Last day for Teachers 
Teachers report 
School opens 
Veterans 1 Day 
Thanksgiving Vacation 

(minimum day on November 27) 
Christmas Vacation 

(minimum day on December 20) 



January 2 
February 18 - 22 
April 15 - 19 
May 30 
June 21 
June 28 
September 3 
September 9 
November 11 
November 28, 29 

December 23 - Jan. 1 



NO-SCHOOL SIGNAL 

In the event of exceptionally severe weather conditions or when 
the transportation system is disrupted, WBZ, WEE I, WNAC, WKQX and 
WHDH will broadcast the no-school announcement between 7:00 and 8:00 

A. M. 

Whenever school is not held at the High School bus service will 
not be provided for tuition students attending Concord or Weston 
High Schools. 

Since weather reports are not always reliable, and since the 
School District desires to render maximum education service, the 
schools will remain open except in very severe weather. 



133 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

REPORT OF 
LINCOLN-SUDBURI REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

The Regional School Committee this year has the enviable pleasure 
of reporting accomplishments that have been five years in the making. 
Credit for these is widely spread among the many individuals who have 
served on the Committee, its subcommittees, its predecessor committees, 
and among the many individual citizens of both Towns. The strong 
determination of both Towns to take maximum advantage of the fortuitous 
opportunity to establish a new secondary school of superior quality 
appears, at this time, to be well on the way towards accomplishing just 
exactly that. Particular credit can fairly be given to fortunate 
timing, dogged persistence, a most effective construction committee, 
some measure of good luck, and very competent professional guidance 
from our Superintendent, architects, legal counsel, and bankers. 

The School was planned, constructed and completed within the time 
schedule optimistically established three years before its doors 
opened. On the first day of school, September 10, 1956, all equip- 
ment needed for conducting classes had been obtained and installed. 
Shortly thereafter the equipping of the entire building was completed. 

As significant as the timely completion and equipping of the build- 
ing is the fact that in the face of constantly rising costs this was 
done entirely within the budget that had been laid down in the early 
stages of the Districts organization. Our capital financing of 
$1,500,000 at an average interest rate of slightly less than 2ffi 
would cost the Towns considerably more today. 

The most significant accomplishment to report is the employment of 
a teaching staff of outstanding quality. A competitive salary scale 
and exceptional professional opportunities did much to attract a large 
number of applicants from the limited supply. Besides these factors 
the Region's announced educational policy and the attitude of the two 
Towns towards the establishment and maintenance of a strong secondary 
school have facilitated the assembling of a superior faculty. The 
continued effectiveness of this staff will depend directly on the 
sustained interest in good education that has marked these two Towns. 

Until a full year's experience has been gained and the objectives 
achieved measured against the costs incurred, the Committee can only 
report that with reference to operating expenses, it has earnestly 
sought to obtain the maximum result for the minimum outlay. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John W. Carman Luther M. Child, Jr. 

Elizabeth B. Harding William A. Wilson 

Howard W. Emmons, Vice Chairman Victor A. Lutnicki, Chairman 



13A 



REGIONAL DISTRICT TREASURER 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



District Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1956 

Less: 1955 bills paid prior to January- 


10, 1956 


$ 


305,627.46 
4,612.23 


Adjusted cash balance, January 1, 1956 






$ 


301,015.23 


Receipts: 

Sale of Treasury Bonds 

Lincoln assessment 

Sudbury assessment 

State Grant, building construction 

Interest on treasury bonds 

Refunds 

Miscellaneous 




$646,365.50 

57,971.47 

87,665.00 

31,881.42 

6,618.50 

23.04 

1,120.72 




831,645.65 








$1,132,660.88 


Disbursements: 

District operating expenses 
Debt service 
Principal 
Interest 
School construction 
Payroll withheld taxes 




$118,202.52 

80,000.00 

35,745.00 

757,473.42 

232.63 




991,653.57 


Cash balance, District Fund, December 31, 


1956 




$ 


141,007.31 


Cafeteria Fund 








Cash balance, January 1, 1956 
Receipts: 

Disbursements: 






$" 


00.00 
7,119.31 
7,119.31 
6,902.35 


Cash balance, Cafeteria Fund, December 31 


, 1956 




$ 


216.96 


Athletic Fund 








Cash balance, January 1, 1956 
Receipts: 

Disbursements: 






$ 
$~ 


00.00 

56.00 

56.00 

9.00 


Cash balance, Athletic Fund, December 31, 


1956 




$ 


47.00 


Total cash balance, December 31, 1956 






$ 


141,271.27 



135 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



BALANCE SHEET 
December 31, 1956 



ASSETS 



Cash 


$141,271.27 


Total Assets 


$141,271.27 


LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 




Appropriation Balances: 

Non-Revenue : 
Construction 
State Grant: Construction Costs 
Revolving Funds: 

Cafeteria 

Athletic 
Surplus Revenue 


$ 81,638.15 
31,881.42 

216.96 

47.00 

27,487.74 


Total Liabilities and Reserves 


$141,271.27 


(Signed) George B. Flint 
Treasurer 





136 



REGIONAL SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the School Committee: 

This is the first report of the first Superintendent of the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District. The District was organ- 
ized and the school plant developed with overwhelming popular support. 
The development of the educational policies of the school were based 
upon the outcome of a study of secondary education by parents and 
teachers conducted under the auspices of the Lincoln School Associa- 
tion and with the co-operation of the Sudbury Parent Teacher Associa- 
tion. With this public participation in the planning process the 
school has been able to begin its functioning with a maximum of under- 
standing . 

Now that the staff and parents have had an opportunity to adjust 
to the new situation, the detail planning of the enlarged curriculum, 
made possible by the increasing enrollment, is under way. A publi- 
cation describing the curriculum is planned for this Spring. This 
report is concerned with the professional staff and standards. 

Professional Staff 

The School Committee recognizes the paramount importance of the 
quality of the professional staff in its statement in the Educational 
Policy Bulletin issued in January, 1956: 

"A superior school can only be developed through a superior pro- 
fessional staff. A superior staff requires not only exceptionally 
well qualified individual members who are fully developed mature 
people with interests beyond their areas of specialization, but also 
a proper balance of a wide range of specialized teachers who have 
teaching assignments which utilize these capabilities. All staff 
members must be prepared to function as members of an integrated team 
as well as expressing their own individualities. 

"The quality of the individual staff members has been assured 
through several basic policy decisions. 

(1) A salary schedule has been adopted which is fully com- 
petitive in starting and maximum salaries with the best schools in 
New England. 

(2) A staff organization has been created which provides 
reasonably small classes and thus permits a teacher to give close 
attention to the individual student. 

(3) Each teacher will play a significant role in the planning 
of the courses he teaches in relationship to the total school curri- 
culum. The staff will be employed for these planning activities 
prior to the opening of school.* 1 



137 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



The twenty two full time members of the staff were selected with 
great care. Twenty one were recruited from other school systems and 
one from Salem Teachers College. Four came from private school 
situations with one each coming from Montclair Academy in New Jersey, 
University School in Grosse Point, Michigan, Wilbraham Academy in 
Wilbraham, and Cambridge School in Weston. The remaining seventeen 
teachers came from eight public school systems with nine coming from 
Sudbury, two coming from Saugus, and one each coming from Holliston, 
Westwood, Needham, Newton, Brookline and Woodbury, Connecticut. 

The teachers received their professional training in Colleges and 
Universities located in nine states and Europe. Included in the 
list are: Harvard, Tufts, Dartmouth, Columbia, Simmons, Syracuse, 
Middlebury, Radcliffe, Regis and The Sorbonne. A majority hold 
Masters 1 or higher degrees. All teachers of academic classes have 
degrees in the area of specialization supplemented by training in the 
field of Education. 

The increase in enrollment in September, 1957, will permit the 
addition of several more members to the staff. This will make it 
possible to add several areas of specialization and increase the pro- 
portion of time that teachers will be utilizing their strengths in 
areas of primary specialization. 

Educational Standards 

"High standards 11 have been a central concept in the development of 
the philosophy of the Regional High School. This concept serves as 
a guide for long-range planning as well as a criterion by which we 
may conduct more immediate evaluations of our progress. The concept 
of "standards" is frequently limited to merely the scholastic achieve- 
ment of a significant number of the student body. However, we have 
visualized the scope of "high standards 11 to include and to be pri- 
marily concerned with the mental set or attitude with which the 
student approaches his studies in the school, his relations with the 
faculty and with fellow students, and his approach to his own future 
as an adult. It is the school's belief that the success of our 
young people will be strongly correlated with their attitudes while 
with us, and which they will take with them into industry or advanced 
schooling upon graduation. 

These standards of attitude are thought of in terms of the 
individual's efforts to achieve them rather than as something imposed 
upon the student by an outside authority; i.e., the school has set 
high standards but our real success is measured by the individual's 
attempts to achieve them. A specific example of this concept is in 
our approach to a high standard of "good" discipline. Good disci- 
pline is self -discipline. We believe that a school which functions 



138 



REGIONAL SUFERINTENEENT OF SCHOOLS 



only through the withholding of freedom from its students does not 
have good discipline regardless of how meek and regimented the group 
might be. The standard of discipline is best achieved through the 
choice of our students as they impose self -discipline in their daily 
activities and are guided into correct attitudes and pattern of 
behavior. 

To achieve this objective of self-discipline on the part of the 
student body requires two things: first, an understanding and accept- 
ance of the responsibility which accompanies freedom; and secondly, 
the protection of the majority of students from the actions of the 
few who by refusing to accept the responsibility for their actions 
threaten the progress of the larger group. The school took the 
first step last September when the "ground rules" relating to ex- 
pected behavior and self -discipline were discussed in homerooms and 
in assemblies. Included in this orientation were such items as the 
courtesy and respect to be shown to adults and in particular to their 
teachers, consideration for the wishes and freedom of other students, 
and the need to protect and maintain the beauty of their new school 
and its furnishings. Good discipline has been promoted through the 
personal relations which have developed between individuals as they 
go about their day-to-day tasks. 

It is still early to be certain of the long-range results of our 
standard of discipline but we are very pleased to note that, to date, 
the group involved in serious failures to meet our standard has been 
extremely small. We can also report that there has not been a single 
case of damage to any part of the new school, or of any of its furnish- 
ings and equipment. We are confident that our concept of having high 
standards of attitude forms a firm basis for high standards of academic 
attainment. As our students continue to develop a sense of self- 
direction, to accept the responsibility for making plans and decisions, 
to take an increasing pride in their accomplishments and to display 
initiative in improving their academic standing, it is reasonable to 
conclude that the school will have fulfilled one of its basic roles 
in preparing our young people to take their places in the adult com- 
munity. 

In the development of standards of academic achievement, the members 
of the teaching staff have set standards within the school which are 
realistically related to the abilities and purposes of our students. 
In addition we will evaluate the school as a totality against absolute 
standards based on the norms and achievements which mark the leading 
schools of the East. In this context we relate our expectations to 
accepted standards as well as to the individual student. 

Our thinking in this area is that, if we have been successful in 
establishing high standards of attitude and self -direction, we will 



139 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



be able to guide our students toward a standard of achievement which 
is high in relationship to individual ability. The distribution of 
the ability levels of students indicates a high potential which can 
produce a school that is outstanding when compared with other top 
public and private schools in this region. 

The steps by which a student translates his attitude and purpose 
into high levels of achievement are based on sound instruction by his 
teachers who are aware of the differences which exist between rates of 
progress. For the high-potential student this will take the form of 
more rigorous courses, more rapid coverage of material, and a greater 
depth of penetration into a specific subject or field. The Faculty 
of the Regional High School utilizes such techniques as the planning 
of work in units of logical progression, making allowances for spon- 
taneous interests and contributions; by setting levels of achievement 
which are within the ability level of the group, but which are up- 
graded as the students gain confidence and a bacVopound of knowledge: 
by using a positive approach in noting and commending praiseworthy 
evidences of pupil growth in either academic achievement or social 
development; by stimulating the development of personal interests, 
such as a student's interest in auto mechanics, which can be related 
to such areas as compositions and oral reports; by the crossing of 
subject lines, as in the use of science, math, and music teachers as 
visiting lecturers in the English classes to relate the use of English 
to these disciplines; by stimulating in their students a desire to 
contribute to our American culture and governmental processes by 
activity as a student in the P. T. S. A. , as a member of civic organi- 
zations, and by interest in town affairs. 

Included in the physical means by which the Regional High School 
assists a student to attain a high standard of achievement is the 
school library. In it can be found a range of interests and varying 
levels of difficulty which make it possible for all students to find 
materials and literature to satisfy their needs. The library also 
serves as a coordinating agency to supply all other areas with maps, 
audio-visual material, and printed matter. It distributes printed 
information whicn has been gathered by the Guidance Department, and 
exchanges various materials used in units of study which involve 
different departments. The students are offered books, magazines, 
6,r:d res-a^oh resources v 1 ' h enable them to continue to expand their 
areas of interest as well as to raise their level of general culture. 
We have specific reports from parents regarding the increased amount 
of reading as well as an improvement in reading ability, and these 
reports are reinforced by the fact that our rate of circulation of 
books per pupil is considerably above average. The student partici- 
pationprogram in which the students learn to operate the library has 
served to deve^. personal skills, and to encourage them to seek the 
satisfy i + " m which comes from service to others in the community. 



140 



REGIONAL SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



Standing at the halfway point of our first year of existence 
(operation) we can report to the citizens of Lincoln and Sudbury that 
they have a high school, and a student body, of which they can be 
proud. We feel that with the combination of an excellent school 
building, an outstanding faculty and student body, and an interested, 
co-operative citizenry, the Lincoln -Sudbury Regional High School is 
well on its way toward its initial goal as the outstanding school of 
this area. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Rexford S. Souder 

Superintendent of Schools 



141 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT 
Regional District Operating Expenses 





1956* 


1957 






Budget 


Funds Available 






Appropriation, Salaries and Expense 


$118,343.00 


$243,635.00 


Add: Credit refund 


5.00 




Total Funds Available 


$118,353.00 




Expenditures 






General Control 






Superintendent's Salary 


$ 7,066.6^ 


$ 7,700.00 


Other expenses 


5,063.47 


5,250.00 


Expense of Instruction 






Teachers 1 salaries 


44,867.70 


116,370.00 


Expense of school office 


1,748.03 


3,550.00 


Textbooks 


7,779.56 


3, HO. 00 


Supplies 


5,820.33 


3,220.00 


Expense of Operating School Plants 






Custodians 1 salaries 


5,279.05 


4,950.00 


Fuel 


2,958.18 


15,235.00 


Miscellaneous of operation 


5,761.93 


15,900.00 


Maintenance 






Maintenance and repairs 


2,311.31 


5,500.00 


Auxiliary Agencies 






Tr anspor tat ion 


8,798.01 


27,435.00 


Libraries 


1,006.46 


3,300.00 


Health and physical education 


3,781.92 


4,500.00 


Miscellaneous 


6,502.03 


4,755.00 


Tuition 


7,630.44 


15,600.00 


Other Expense 






Out of state travel 


289.18 


750.00 


Evening use of school buildings 


13.50 


700.00 


Vocational tuition 


1,524.78 


5,780.00 


Total Expenditures 


$118,202.52 


$243,635.00 


Unexpended Balance 


$ 150.48 




Apportionments 






Total Budget 


$118,348.00 


$243,635.00 


Available Funds in District Treasury 


26,755.78 


1,764.83 


Balance to be Apportioned 


$ 91,592.22 


$241,870.17 


Lincoln Apportionment 


$ 35,151.81 


$ 92,716.50 


Sudbury Apportionment 


$ 56,440. 41 


$ 149,153.67 



142 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



State Aid 



The Towns receive a 15% bonus on their State School Aid due to 
being in a Region. This extra aid based on the 1955-56 school year 
equals §U, 500 for Lincoln and $6,700 for Sudbury. In the future the 
Towns will receive aid based on the teachers at the Regional High 
School. The aid for the 1956-57 school year will equal $13,400 for 
Lincoln and $32,700 for Sudbury. 

The Towns also receive reimbursement for the cost of transporting 
students to Vocational Schools and one half the cost of their tuition, 

The Regional District receives full reimbursement for the cost of 
transportation. The first reimbursement based on the 1956-57 school 
year will approximate $21,000. 



* In 1956 provision was made for operation of the school for 
four months only. In 1957 provision is made for a full year's opera- 
tion and a 100 pupil increase of enrollment next September. 



143 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND STAFF 
January 1, 1957 

School Committee 



Victor A, Lutnicki, Chairman 
Howard W. Emmons, Vice Chairman 
John W. Carman 
Luther M. Child, Jr. 
Elizabeth B. Harding 
William A. Wilson 



Superintendent of Schools 



Rexford S. Souder, Ed.D. 



Term Expires 
1958 
1958 
1959 
1957 
1959 
1957 



Hilltop 3-2662 



Office, Concord and Lincoln Roads, Sudbury 
Secretary to School Committee 



Lily T. Spooner 



George B. Flint 



District Treasurer 



Teaching Personnel 
(All appointed 1956) 



Leslie M. Tourville 
James A. Douce tte 
Bramwell B. Arnold 
Katherine D. Barton 
John W. Black 
Ruth M. Buxton 
Miriam S. Coombs 
Melvin L. Downing 
Marion F. Edwards 
Alan F. Flynn 
Anne T. Gombosi 
Henry Kaufman 
William F. Keough, Jr. 
Helen D. Lelecas 
Alexander G. Marshall, Jr, 
Katherine R. McKenna 
Ernest S. Merrill, Jr. 
Norman W. Platine 



Hilltop 3-2662 



CLearwater 9-8611 



Principal 

Director of Guidance 

Science -Ma t hema t i c s 

Homemaking 

Fine Arts 

latin -English 

English 

Industrial Arts 

Science-Counselor 

Mathematics 

Music 

Music 

Driver Education 

Business 

Mathematics 

French 

Hi story -Social Studies 

Social Studies 



IKK 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Elwood C. Philbrick 
Mary L. Roberts 
John A. Rogers 
Roger T. Thurston 
Irene R. Tutuny 
Paul Volk 



Gordon D. Winchell, M. D. 
Virginia Whitney 



Hope Baldwin 
Dorothy Grannis 



Lily T. Spooner 



Health Personnel 

School Physician 
School Nurse 

School Secretaries 

High School 
Superintendent f s 

Office 
Superintendent f s 

Office 



Librarian-English 

Physical Education 

English 

Science-Counselor 

Business 

Physical Education 



CLearwater 9-8618 
Hilltop 3-2662 



Hilltop 3-2662 
Hilltop 3-2662 
Hilltop 3-2662 



Custodians and Maintenance 



William L. Long, Head Custodian and Maintenance 

Paul Moynihan 

Charles Vieira 

Oliver Wainio 

Eleanor E, Macdonald, Matron 



Bus Operators 



Kenneth R. Hooper (2 buses] 
Eric Johnson 
Charles A. Frost 
Rodney Hadley 



Cafeteria Personnel 



Helen L. Wheeler, Manager 
Rachel Adams, Cook 
Eleanor A. Darby 
Jane L. Parks 
Roberta F. Podgurski 



Contractor 
Contractor 
Leased Bus 
Leased Bus 



U5 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 
LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 





MEMBERSHIP BI AGE AND GRADE 










October 1, 


1956 














BOTS 










Age 


13 


U 


15 


16 


17 


18 


Totals 


Grade 
















9 


18 


23 




3 






4-9 


10 




10 


25 


2 


1 




38 


11 






5 


<; 


3 


2 


15 


12 








3 


6 




9 


PG 










1 


1 


2 



Total 



18 



33 35 



13 



11 



113 









GIRLS 










Age 


13 


H 


15 


16 


17 


18 


Totals 


Grade 
















9 


25 


28 


7 








60 


10 




7 


19 


3 


1 




30 


11 






7 


13 


2 




22 


12 








7 


1? 


2 


22 


Total 


25 


35 


33 


23 


16 


2 


134. 




Grand Total 










247 



TUITION PUPILS ATTENDING OTHER SCHOOLS 
October 1, 1956 



Concord 

Weston 

Newton Technical High School 

Newton Technical Vocational High 

Norfolk Agricultural School 

Rindge Technical School 

Worcester Boys 1 Trade High School 

Total Other Schools 



11 12 



22 



18 
7 



Total 



18 

29 

k 

1 
1 
1 

1 

55 



146 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Distribution of Students Between Lincoln and Sudbury 





Lincoln 


Sudbury 


Tuition 


Total 


Regional High 


U 


182 


1 


247 


Other schools 


52 


__3 


~ 


_55 


Total 


116 


135 


1 


302 



147 



Ofppenalx 



VITAL STATISTICS 
66 Births, 32 Marriages and 29 Deaths were recorded during the year 1956. 



BIRTHS 



Date of 
Birth 
1955 
July 28 
Sept. 7 
Sept. TMr 
Sept. 28 
Oct. 3 
Oct. 25 
Oct. 27 
Oct. 27 
Nov. 22 
Nov. 28 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 6 
Nov. 12 

1956 
Jan. 7 
Jan. 17 
Jan. 21 

Jan. 23 

Feb. 9 

Feb. 16 

Feb. 16 

Feb. 16 

Feb. 17 

March 9 
April 2 
April 13 
May U 
May 5 
May 19 
May 
May 
May 

May 27 
June 6 
June 10 

June 13 
June 15 
June 20 
June 22 
June 26 
June 29 
July 10 



Name of Child 



20 
21 
25 



Mary Abigail Parsons Coolidge 
Jennifer Snow Ragan 
Robin Chipman 
Donna Manzelli 
Heidi Ellen Hall 
Victoria Pierce Pearmain 
Edward Harrington Morgan 
Croston Patterson Cole Ryan 
Lesley Mitchell Burk 
Jonathan Boykin Niles 
Chesley Ely Haden 
Jonathan Schirmer Church 
Dana Toiro Korhonen 



Elizabeth Lee Comegys 
Wendy Elizabeth Sample 
Jennifer Ann Hennessy 

Glenn David Hill 
Shirley Anne Hanson 
Stefan Andrew Caras 
Maureen Sheila Cook 
Richard Joseph Panetta 
John Stephen Byers 

Suzanne Gail Martini 
Terry Gordon Peterson 
John Thaddeus Nunez 
Lee William Nelson 
Mary Ann Greaves 
Bradley Charles Jeter 
Thomas Kerr Car ley 
Mary Macy Doherty 
Robert Coleman Sampson 
Samuel Newbold Ogden 
Mark Anthony O'Neill 
Geoffrey Drew Browning 

Peter Pritchard Bernhardt 
Belinda Mary Taillacq 
Frederick Thomas Murphy III 
Diane Elizabeth Campobasso 
Jessena Faunce 
James Eugene Smith 
Beverly Pino 



Names Of Parents 

Henry P. & Alice C. Coolidge 
Ralph R. & Ruth S. M. Ragan 
Robert H. & Mary F. Chipman 
John & Dorothy L. Manzelli 
Cecil E. & Nancy E. Hall 
William R. & Claire P. Pearmain 
Henry M. &. Gwen G. Morgan 
James U. C. & Hope P. G. Ryan 
George W. & Ruth M. D. Burk 
Robert L. &. Virginia M. Niles 
Russell L. & Constance E. Haden 
Robert T. & Friscilla S. Church 
Edwin & Miriam W. Korhonen 



Walker B. , Jr. & Adelaide E. Comegys 
Wilbur H. S. & Joan G. D. Sample 
Frank J., Jr. & Pauline G. Y. 

Hennessy 
Frank R. & Sarah 0. F. Hill 
Everett 0. & Doris B. Hanson 
Byron & Anastasia K. Caras 
Harry & Kathleen G. M. Cook 
Salvatore & Rita D. Panetta 
John Scranton & Grace -Ellen W. D. 

Byers 
William & Virginia J. E. Martini 
Frank W. & Mary E. G. Peterson 
Vasco E. & Llewellyn G. Nunez 
Duncan M. & Jean R. Nelson 
Allan W. & Theresa D. D. Greaves 
Charles A. & Linda B. A. Jeter 
John A. & Joan K. Car ley 
Edward J. & Mary M. F. Doherty 
Coleman W. & Phyllis E. B. Sampson 
David D. & Joan A. Ogden 
Paul A. & Joan A. C. O'Neill 
George U. , Jr. & Marjorie E. M. 
Browning 
John R. & Ruth P. Bernhardt 
Henry & Jean H. Taillacq 
Frederick T. & Virginia C. C. Murphy 
Joseph R. & Mary A. N. Campobasso 
Anthony & Mary G. Faunce 
John E. & Patricia A. P. Smith 
Francesco J. & Muriel E. D. Pino 



148 



VITAL STATISTICS 



July 13 


July 24 


July 


26 


Aug. 


12 


Aug. 


13 


Aug. 


H 


Aug. 


H 


Aug. 


17 


Aug. 


18 


Aug. 


26 


Aug. 


29 


Sept 


. 1 


Sept 


. 21 


Oct. 


5 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


13 


Nov. 


13 


Nov. 


U 


Nov. 


26 


Dec. 


31 


Aug. 


23 


Nov.- 


2 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


28 



Paul Maurice Leslie, Jr. 

Mary Jeanne Neville 

Stephen Leger 

David Maher 

Kevin Paul Shea 

Alan Kendall Herlihy 

Robin Booth 

Douglas Madison Harvey 

Gail Lind Douty 

Nathaniel Capps Shambaugh 

Nancy Lee Woods 

Michelle Myles 

Baby Boy Eckhardt 

Neal David Braude 

Michael Wayne Smothers 

Ann Marie Cunningham 

David McNear Rand 

Matthew Lewis Caras 

Sheryl Coburn Street 

Ann Marion Hagenian 

Alexander Piers Davison West 



Paul & Elizabeth M. Leslie 
James M. & Marjorie J. B. Neville 
Norman & Mary W. Leger 
Raymond J. & Adline A. R. Maher 
William J. & Margaret T. B. Shea 
Maurice K. & Jean E. H. Herlihy 
Philip E. & Margaret H. T. Booth 
Carroll S. & Judith A. T. Harvey 
Lloyd A. & Svea V. L. Douty 
Benjamin & Joan D. Shambaugh 
Henry A. & Barbara R. G. Woods 
J. Richard & Theresa A. M. Myles 
Homer D. & Mary G. Eckhardt 
Stephen E. & Bettie L. J. Braude 
Claude D. & Audrey L. R. Smothers 
George A. & Rose R. Cunningham 
William M. & Priscilla B. W. Rand 
Ophair & Florence C. L. Caras 
Earle B. & Janet H. Street 
Joseph C. & Irene R. D. Hagenian 
Anthony J. & Jean M. West 



Late Registrations 



Cynthia Tucker Mason 
Janice Birdine Foust 
Carol Elizabeth Bonia 
Sheryl Jennet Doherty 



Max M. , Jr. & Betty M. Mason 
James T. & Dorothy B. Foust 
Walter J. & Germaine 0. B. Bonia 
William R. & Phyllis M. L. Doherty 



H9 



VITAL STATISTICS 





MARRIAGES 




Date of 
Marriage 


Names 

Stanley John Moszka 
Mary Anne Snelling 


Residence 


1956 
Jan. 20 


Lincoln 
Lincoln 


Jan. 28 


Benjamin D. Adams 
Serita Marlene Babson 


Lincoln 

North Brooksville, Maine 


March 10 


John Robert Bergquist 
Alice E. Adler 


Lincoln 
Waltham 


March 17 


Thomas Charles Small 
Norma Frances Fleming 


Somerville 
Lincoln 


March 23 


Bryce Allen Hogue 
Marcia Ann Nansel 


Lincoln 

Omaha, Nebraska 


April 21 


John B. Boughan 
Dorothy E. Corrigan 


Newton 
Lincoln 


April 28 


Albert William Held, Jr. 
Geraldine M. Aptt 


Arlington 
Lincoln 


May 6 


Ernest Keysar Khoury, Jr. 
Mary Therese Gradeski 


Bangor, Maine 
Lincoln 


May 12 


Robert Curtis Chapin, Jr. 
Leah Adele Alexander 


Lincoln 
Fall River 


May 12 


Frank E. Walton 
Julie T. Campobasso 


Lexington 
Lincoln 


May 27 


Daniel John Mather 
Mary Anne Simonds 


Concord 
Lincoln 


June 9 


Robert George Van Leuven 
Jacqueline Lenore Chapman 


Providence, R. I. 
Lincoln 


June 9 


Arthur A. Stockellberg 
Doris Mae Nolan 


Lincoln 
Jamaica Plain 


June 16 


Michael Julius Moravcsik 
Francesca de Gogorza 


Patchogue, L. I., N. Y. 
Lincoln 


June 23 


G. Brenton Creelman, III 
Deborah Maynard 


Lincoln 

Long Island, N. Y. 


June 23 


Christopher A. Q. Bovey 
Nancy Rouner 


Montreal, Canada 
Lincoln 


June 23 


Eric Allan Sahlberg 


Lincoln 



Marilyn Godsey 



Darien, Conn. 



150 



VITAL STATISTICS 



June 


23 


Charles William Newell 
Janet Priscilla Haynes 


Lincoln 
Weston 


June 


30 


Keith Alexander Rice 
Helen Mason Daley 


Lincoln 
Lynn, Mass. 


July 


1 


Earl Condit Harrington 
Elizabeth Ann Boyce 


Wethersfield, Conn 
Lincoln 


Sept, 


. 1 


George Goddu Crane 
Elinor DeFord 


Lincoln 
Lincoln 


Sept, 


. 8 


Melvin Bloom 
Jean Agnes Millar 


Connellsville , Pa. 
Lincoln 


Sept, 


. 15 


Howard Donald Ives 
Beverly Grace Crowson 


Gales Ferry, Conn. 
Lincoln 


Oct. 


6 


George K. Byron 
Priscilla H. Giles 


Concord 
Lincoln 


Oct. 


12 


Michael L. Ciraso 
Anne Marie Murray 


Lincoln 
Newton 


Oct. 


19 


E. John Ciraso 
Claire Lee Durnan 


Lincoln 
Lincoln 


Oct. 


27 


Robert W. Davidson 
Cynthia A. Corrigan 


Concord 
Lincoln 


Nov. 


3 


Kent T. Foulkes 
Dorothy Martinson 


Brecksville, Ohio 
Boston, Mass. 


Nov. 


11 


Alfred H. B. Peabody 
Barbara (Gimn) Helm 


Lincoln 
Needham 


Dec. 


22 


Peter A. Thomas 
Muriel M. Hulbert 


Lincoln 
Rehoboth 


Dec. 


28 


George E. Cunningham, Jr. 
Martha (Wellington) Altmann 


Lincoln 
Cambridge 


Dec. 


29 


Frank W. Grinnell, Jr. 
Helen Conant 


Boston 
Lincoln 



151 



VITAL STATISTICS 



DEATHS 



Date of 






Age 




Death 


Name 


Y. 


M. 


D. 


For 1942 


George J. Murphy 


AB 


_ 


_ 


Aug. 25 










1956 










Jan. 22 


Frederick Thornton Lord 


91 


3 


5 


Jan. 27 


Clara Louise Chapin 


88 


11 


13 


Feb. 10 


Frederick C. Weld 


AS 


7 


28 


Feb. 11 


Phoebe Cory 


55 


7 


19 


Feb. 23 


Robert Curtis Chapin 


51 


3 


10 


Feb. 2U 


Harry Causer 


91 


5 


12 


March 3 


John P. Monks 


■54 


8 


8 


March 23 


Herbert L. Moore 


37 


_ 


_ 


April 10 


Andrew Doherty 


U 


3 


- 


May 5 


Ellen Kidder 


29 


_ 


- 


May 12 


Carrie W. Hartwell 


85 


8 


20 


May 22 


William Bernard Riley 


76 


2 


17 


June 8 


Donald LaMont Robinson 


58 





22 


July 1 


Pasquale Bova Conti 


53 


9 


23 


July 18 


Johanna Peterson 


73 


10 


19 


July 25 


Frank J. Flynn 


76 


8 


28 


July 31 


Frederick Murphy 





1 


11 


Aug. 19 


Henry A. Butcher 


77 





1 


Aug. 29 


Louis H. Freese 


89 


9 


21 


Sept. 5 


Nellie J. Weeks 


n 


8 


5 


Sept. 11 


Alma N. Swanson 


42 


1 


3 


Sept. 21 


Baby Boy Eckhardt 




2 H. 59 M. 




Sept. 29 


Julia Catherine Southner 


88 


9 


19 


Oct. 7 


Dean Edwin Jan van Etten 


72 


5 


9 


Oct. 19 


Tamzin K. Robus 


80 


7 


21 


Nov. 10 


William C. Wade 


30 


5 


5 


Nov. 18 


Carl Stahleker 


77 


2 





Nov. 21 


Katherine Cunningham 


75 


3 


26 



152 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


| 8,000 


I 464.00 


39,550 


2,293.90 


16,000 


928.00 


10,000 


580.00 


13,750 


797.50 


2,000 


116.00 


3,150 


182.70 


300 


17.40 


5,500 


319.00 


4,400 


255.20 


4, 600 


266.80 


5,700 


330.60 


600 


34.80 


7,850 


455.30 


5,800 


336.40 


12,100 


701.80 


2,300 


133.40 


1,000 


58.00 


16,600 


962.80 


4,500 


261.00 


3,250 


188.50 


8,800 


510.40 


4,500 


261.00 


7,000 


406.00 


7,000 


406.00 


7,500 


435.00 


11,050 


640.90 


6,700 


388.60 


9,000 


522.00 


2,000 


116.00 


1,250 


72.50 


500 


29.00 


3,300 


191.40 


1,650 


95.70 


4,200 


243.60 


2,600 


150.80 


3,000 


174.00 


4,600 


266.80 


5,200 


301.60 


6,000 


348.00 


5,550 


321.90 


7,000 


406.00 


7,400 


429.20 


6,500 


377.00 


100 


5.80 


16,050 


930.90 



Abbott, John A. & Diana B. 

Adams, John Q. & Lucy D. 

Adams, Ramelle C. 

Adkins, Archibald W. & Dorothea 

Adler, Harold 

Adler, Ivy Ruth 

A'Hearn, Marian E. 

Albano Brothers 

Algeo, John T. & Catherine R. 

Algeo, Leo J. & Elaine T. 

Algeo, Margaret M. & Neville, Agnes M. 

Allied Commonwealth Corporation 

American Legion 

Ammen, David L. & Judith B. 

Anderson, Carl L. & Ruth 

Anderson, Lawrence B. & Rosina DuP. 

Andrews, Paul R. & Catherine L. 

Angell, Craig W. & Carolyn G. 

Angelo, Gaspar & Eda Polcari 

Appleby, Richard B. 

Aptt, Harry S. & Etta E. 

Armstrong, Virginia 

Arnold, S. Leonard & Anna M. 

Aseltine, Harold C. & Helen B. 

Ashworth, Harold T. & Irma D. 

Avery, Abigail D. 

Ayer, Richard B. & Constance 

Baggs, Arthur, Jr. & Marion S. 

Bailey, Richard B. & Rebecca B. 

Baker, John C. & Elizabeth E. 

Ballentine-Ober Market 

Baldwin, William H. & Agnes D. 

Baltrush, William C. & Sarah M. 

Barbarow, Ruth 

Barber, John W. Jr. & Mary E. 

Bardsley, Doris A. 

Barker, William R. & Barbara S. 

Barnaby, John M. & Charlotte B. 

Barr, Edgar E. & Olive H. 

Barrington, William D. & Barbara L. 

Barthel, Walter 

Beaton, Daniel R. & Shirley G. 

Belanger, Walter E. & Mary F. 

Bellizia, Francis E. & Mary H. 

Benton, Carl R. & Barbara A. 

Bergen, Kenneth W. 



153 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARI 1, 1956 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Bergquist, Walter J. & Brita M. 

Bernson, Bob & Edith J. 

Bertolami, Paolina 

Billings, Bruce H. & Sarah W. 

Billings, James B. & Marion 

Bingham, Elizabeth A. 

Bingham, Elizabeth P. B. 

Bingham, George C. 

Bishop, Fern W. 

Black, Everett A. & Anne E. 

Blais, George A. & Annette C. 

Blake, Charles H. & Helen L. 

Blakeley, Gerald W., Jr. 

Boccadoro, Joseph & Ida 

Bockoven, John Sanbourne & Dorothy Ruth 

Boehmer, Howard W. & Norma F. 

Bogner, Walter F. & Edith 

Bolt, Richard H. & Katherine L. 

Bolton, Geoffrey 

Bolton, Stanwood K. & Thalia H. 

Bonaceto, Anthony & Grace 

Bonia, Walter J. 

Booth, Alice Burrage 

Booth, Philip & Margaret I. 

Booth, Robert H. 

Borton, John E. & Joan A. 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. 

Boston Edison Co. 

Boston & Maine Railroad 

Bowles, Clifford 

Bowles, William 

Boyce Brothers 

Boyce, Manley B. 

Boyce, Manley B. & Alice M. 

Boyce, Mary M. 

Boyer, Edward 

Bradford, Robert L. & Martha A. 

Bradley, Clifford & Jeanne tte E. 

Bradshaw, Fred & Julia S. 

Brainard, Edward C. II & Elizabeth H. 

Breed, Laura Post, Marsh, Margaret 

Breed & Paul Everhart 
Brewster, Ellen Beebe 
Briggs, Susan L. 
Brisson, Norman 
Brisson, Norman F. & Evelyn W. 





$ 5,600 


f 324.80 




1,100 


63.80 




3,500 


203.00 




8,030 


465.74 




4,850 


281.30 




9,250 


536.50 




250 


14.50 




500 


29.00 




4,500 


261.00 




32,700 


1,896.60 




500 


29.00 




10,500 


609.00 




63,250 


3,668.50 




100 


5.80 




4,600 


266.80 




8,000 


464.00 




9,200 


533.60 




1,300 


75.40 




800 


46.40 




8,000 


464.OO 




500 


29.00 




5,400 


313.20 




500 


29.00 




5,250 


304.50 




14,300 


829.40 




2,300 


133.40 


90,000 




5,220.00 


244,650 


300 


14,207.10 




900 


52.20 




6,500 


377.00 


650 


4,000 


269.70 


600 


12,000 


730.80 




3,000 


174.00 




2,500 


145.00 




4,500 


261.00 




3,800 


220.40 




5,800 


336.40 




2,880 


167.04 




5,000 


290.00 




5,000 


290.00 




7,100 


411.80 




50 


2.90 




13,500 


783.00 


200 




11.60 




1,900 


110.20 



154 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Polly F. 

Mary D. 

& Katherine A. 



& Lila 
Doris L. 



Bronson, Franklin C. & Catherine M. 
Brooks, Albert S. & Maude M. 
Brooks , Paul 
Brown, Deborah Trull, David Trull, 

Alan Trull 
Brown, Elizabeth G. 
Brown, Robert P. & 
Browne, Secor D. & 
Browning, Edgar C. 
Browning, George U, 
Brown's Wood, Inc. 
Buerger, Martin J. 
Bulkley, Joel B. & 
Burckett, Douglas M. & Phillippa C. 
Burgess, Catherine M. 
Burgess, Rebecca M. & Jeddrie, Mary M. 
Burke, Edward J. & Helen V. 
Burke, Ruth Bemis 
Burns, Melvin P. 

Burns, William C. & Daisy May Day 
Busfield, Gibson L. & Marilyn A. 
Butcher, Charles R. 
Butcher, Henry A. Jr. & Margaret V. 
Butcher, Ralph E. 
Butler, Hector & Audrey Edith 
Butler, William H. & Nancy G. 
But trick, David Company 
Buxton, David & Lois Pardee 
Bygrave, Robert & Lucy E. 

Calkins, Ramona T. & Charles W. 

Calkins, Charles W. & Thelma E. 

Calkins, Charles W. Jr. & Martha Anne 

Callahan, Thomas R. 

Campbell, Fannie S. 

Campobasso, Anthony B. & Dorothy M. 

Campobasso, Ethel 

Campobasso, Joseph R. 

Cannon, Bradford & Ellen DeN. 

Cannon, Ellen DeN. & Bradford 

Caras, Byron & Anastasia 

Caras, Ophair & Florence L. 

Car ley, John A. & Joan Kerr 

Carman, Eleanor T. 

Carney, Florence T. 

Carney, James J. & Agnes M. 



1,000 



500 



$ 7,100 


$ 411.80 


5,400 


313.20 


9,750 


565.50 


200 


11.60 


14,000 


812.00 


13,400 


777.20 


7,000 


406.00 


4,950 


287.10 


5,900 


400.20 


4,100 


237.80 


10,600 


614.80 


10,700 


620.60 


7,100 


411.80 


1,500 


87.00 


3,250 


188.50 


4,500 


261.00 


7,200 


417.60 


3,600 


208.80 


3,000 


174.00 


6,000 


348.00 


1,850 


107.30 


2,100 


121.80 


4,300 


249.40 


3,250 


188.50 


4,750 


275.50 


10,100 


614.80 


6,000 


348.00 


6,500 


377.00 


3,200 


185.60 


5,800 


336.40 


600 


34.80 


8,700 


504.60 


7,500 


435.00 


3,100 


179.80 


1,500 


87.00 


1,820 


105.56 


10,000 


580.00 


22,800 


1,322.40 


6,500 


377.00 


6,000 


348.00 


4,500 


261.00 


10,400 


603.20 


3,575 


207.35 


5,000 


290.00 



155 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Carrig, James A. 

Carstensen, Warren & Evelyn G. 

Carty, James R. 

Cassidy, Harry Jr. & Verna E. 

Cassis, Anthony 

Catoia, Angelo & Mary J. 

Catoia, Anthony J. & Lucy M. A. 

Causer, William 0. & Mary E. 

Chadwick, William & Jessie T. 

Chapin, Louise B. & Bertha L. 

Chapin, Margaret E. 

Chapman, James S. & Emily M. 

Chapman, John W. & Elizabeth G. 

Chellis, Herbert N. & Eleanor M. 

Chipman, Robert Hennessy 

Chisholm, Edward C. & Margaret F. 

Chittick, Mary Gertrude & Suesens, 

Eleanor G. 
Church, Robert T. & Priscilla Schirmer 
Churchill, J. Stanley & Ednah G. 
Churchill, Robert R. & June D. 
Cibel, Stanley A. & Thelma W. 
Ciraso, Michael & Amelia 
Clare, Mary E. 
Clark, George A. 
Clark, Mary H. 
Clark, Vern & Velma M. 
Clark, William T. & Catharine T. 
Clasby, Doris E. 
Coan, Thomas F. 
Coane, John H. , Jr. 
Coburn, Edward S. 
Codman, Dorothy S.F.M. 
Codman, Thomas N. et al,; Trustees 
Coffey, John B. & Wilma L. 
Cole, Edwin M. & Lucy F. 
Comstock, Joan B. 
Conant, Lily R. 
Conary, Frances P. 
Condit, Robert P. & Phyllis C. 
Community Store 
Conlin, James J. & Winifred I. 
Connair, John J. & Margaret J. 
Connolly, J. Irving & Evelyn 
Constantine, Philip J. 
Conti, Bartolomeo B. 



250 



1,500 



3,700 


$ 214.60 


19,400 


1,125.20 


500 


29.00 


4,100 


237.80 


10,000 


580.00 


3,100 


179.80 


2,850 


165.30 


3,300 


191.40 


5,500 


319.00 


11,500 


667.00 


3,500 


203.00 


4,775 


276.95 


4,100 


237.80 


4,500 


261.00 


5,000 


290.00 


5,100 


295.80 


7,500 


435.00 


11,100 


643.80 


8,200 


475.60 


5,400 


313.20 


6,300 


365.40 


3,650 


211.70 


7,200 


417.60 


4,100 


237.80 


20,700 


1,200.60 


5,500 


319.00 


13,200 


765.60 


2,100 


121.80 


3,350 


194.30 


2,900 


168.20 


6,200 


374.10 


6,100 


353.80 


61,800 


3,584.40 


4,500 


261.00 


11,200 


649.60 


7,350 


426.30 


9,000 


522.00 


4,500 


261.00 


5,000 


290.00 




87.00 


3,100 


179.80 


3,100 


179.80 


1,900 


110.20 


6,500 


377.00 


6,750 


391.50 



156 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer Estate Estate 


Estate 


Cook Brothers $ 


400 $ 


$ 23.20 


Cook, Celia M. 


8,700 


504.60 


Cook, Harry & Kathleen G. 


5,250 


304.50 


Cook, John F. & Ethel A. 


500 


29.00 


Cook, Paul W., Jr. & Marian M. 


6,500 


377.00 


Coolidge, .Henry P. & Alice C. 


6,900 


400.20 


Cope, Oliver & Alice DeN. 


9,050 


524.90 


Cormey, Henry J. & 111 i one W. 


2,400 


139.20 


Cornrie, Charlotte G. & Howard F. 


500 


29.00 


Corrigan, Dorothy E. 


7,000 


406.00 


Corrigan, Edward D. 


3,500 


203.00 


Corrigan, Leo W. 


3,300 


191.40 


Corrigan, Martin 


2,400 


139.20 


Corrigan, Mary K. 


1,500 


87.00 


Costello, William H. 


1,800 


104.40 


Costello, John D. 


100 


5.80 


Cotoni, Carolana 


4,600 


266.80 


Cousins, Ashley B. 


2,400 


139.20 


Cousins, Harold S. 


12,750 


739.50 


Cousins, Laurence B. & Jeanne B. 


6,100 


353.80 


Cotoni, Joseph 


750 


43.50 


Cousins, Willis N. 


3,450 


200.10 


Cowen, Rodney P. & Elinor 


4,600 


266.80 


Cowles, Addison & Alexandra C. 


5,150 


298.70 


Crandall, Stephen H. & Patricia E. 


5,750 


333.50 


Crane, Charles E. & Hazel G. 


14,750 


855.50 


Crawford, Dorothy B. 


6,000 


348.00 


Crawford, John D. & Joanna W. 


5,500 


319.00 


Creelman, Gilmore B. & Alice M. 


3,550 


205.90 


Crockett, Alan D. & Judith D. 


6,000 


348.00 


Croft, Robert 


200 


11.60 


Crook, Constance L. 


3,000 


174.00 


Crowson, Leslie W. & Madeline W. 


6,800 


394.40 


Culver, Perry J. & Kate S. 


19,200 


1,113.60 


Cunningham, George E. 


4,300 


249.40 


Cunningham, Harold L. & Corrine 


3,600 


208.80 


Cunningham, J. Lewis & Ruth P. 


4,750 


275.50 


Cunningham, Robert M. 


3,900 


226.20 


Cushing, Gustave 


7,625 


442.25 


Dadmun, Harrie H. & Helena 


12,100 


701.80 


Dahl, Thyra 


5,800 


336.40 


Dalzell, Richard W. & Jeanne B. 


2,700 


156.60 


Daraico, Louise 


4,600 


266.80 


Daniels, Bruce G. 


11,600 


672.80 


Daniels, Bruce G. & Janet B. 


10,800 


626.40 



157 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


Danosky, Edward A. 


$ 


$ 500 


$ 29.00 


Danosky, Edward A. & Mary C. 




-4,500 


261.00 


Danosky, Stefania 


1,000 


9,650 


617.70 


D'Arrigo Bros. Co. of Mass. 




2,720 


157.76 


Davis, Alfred M. 


1,250 


4,750 


348.00 


Davis, Bradford D. & Barbara G. 




10,200 


591.60 


Davis, Prescott L. 


1,100 


9,100 


591.60 


Davis, Ronald C. & Barbara C. 




6,200 


359.60 


Davis, Saville R. & Anita V. 




7,500 


435.00 


Davis, Sherman P. 




3,000 


174.00 


Davis, William H. 




3,300 


191.40 


Davison, Archibald T. & Alice P. 




13,000 


754.00 


Day, Delmar L. & Anna M. 




6,500 


377.00 


Dean, Emma W. 




3,200 


185.60 


Dean, Louis W. 




6,800 


394-40 


Dean, Robert C, Jr. & E. Nancy 




1,400 


81.20 


Dean, William M. & Lorraine C. 




3,900 


226.20 


Dean, William M. 




1,000 


58.00 


Dee, Helena A. 




3,100 


179.80 


DeFord, William & Elinor S. 




7,100 


411.80 


DeMone, Harold W. & Elsie R. 




9,900 


574.20 


DeMone, Simeon G. & Estella M. 




700 


40.60 


Denehy, Edward J. & Bernadette J. 




11,900 


690.20 


Denio, F. Winchester 




3,500 


203.00 


DeNormandie, Alice W. 




18,900 


1,096.20 


DeNormandie, James 


2,550 


3,500 


350.90 


DeNormandie, James & Martha 




23,700 


J., 374. 60 


DeNormandie, James & Robert L. 




22,850 


1,325.30 


DeNormandie, Robert L., Estate of 




7,625 


442.25 


DePavla, Dominick 




500 


29.00 


DePavlo 




700 


40.60 


Dewey, Davis R. II 




18,100 


1,049.80 


Denton, Edward W. 


1,450 




84.10 


Dexter, Charles & Charlotte 




5,000 


290.00 


Diamond, James H. 




1,100 


63.80 


Dickie, Richard I. & Julia G. 




500 


29.00 


DiGiovanni, Anthony 


100 




5.80 


DiGiovanni, Anthony & Jean 




5,750 


333.50 


Dodge, Orien B. • 




2,850 


165.30 


Doherty, Edward J. & Finn, Mary M. 




4,700 


272.60 


Doherty, Mary E., Margaret A. & 








Marjorie 




2,000 


116.00 


Doherty, Matthew H. 


2,300 




75.40 


Doherty, Matthew H. & Elizabeth H. 




13 , 800 


800.40 


Domenichella, Dominic 




500 


29.00 


Dominichella, Frank 


300 




17.40 


Dominichella, Frank & Mattie M. 




6,050 


350.90 



158 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer Estate Estate 


Estate 


Donaldson, Estate of Charlotte H. $ 


$ 8,000 


$ 464.00 


Donaldson, Gordon A. & Elizabeth A. 


7,500 


435.00 


Donaldson, Malcolm D. 


8,250 


478.50 


Donaldson, Robert D. 


67,600 


3,920.80 


Donaldson, Robert D. , Jr. 


6,500 


377.00 


Donnelly, Bernard F. & Josephine B. 


1,500 


87.00 


Dougherty, Andrew J. 850 6,350 


417.60 


Dougherty, Dennis M. 


3,600 


208.80 


Dorian, Newart 


3,750 


217.50 


Douglass, Martha K. 


5,750 


333.50 


Downing, Grace L. 


5,000 


290.00 


Drake, Lillian W. & Garmory, Bertha V. 


5,000 


290.00 


Dresser, Charles N. & Ruth C. 


5,600 


324.80 


DuBois, Anson M. & Olive S. 


5,100 


295.80 


DuBois, Eliot & Barbara 


A, 800 


278.40 


Duncan, Albert A. & Agnes A. 


3,850 


223.30 


Durnan, John P. & Leona E. 


6,200 


359.60 


Dust in, Daniel E. & Rachel S. 


6,500 


377.00 


East, John A. & Edla A. 


5,500 


319.00 


Eaton, Gertrude S. 


7,500 


435.00 


Edgell, Henry W. 


13,950 


809.10 


Ehlert, Caroline E. 


10,775 


624.95 


Elliott, Robert H.& Ethel M. 


5,450 


316.10 


Emmons, A. Brad lee & Judith Reed 


8,000 


464.OO 


England, Albert E. & Priscilla S. 


H,000 


812.00 


Ennis, Walter M. , Jr. & Barbara R. 


3,000 


174.00 


Erickson, Leonard V. & Martha F. 


5,000 


290.00 


Evans, Lucius W. & Virginia C. 


16,500 


957.00 


Ewen, Harold I. 


1,000 


58.00 


Faddoul, George P. & Natalie A. 


7,000 


406.00 


Fairbanks, Rollin 


12,500 


725.00 


Fanara, Santo G. & Theresa A. 1,000 5,500 


377.00 


Faran, James J. & Ellen G. 


9,000 


522.00 


Farley, Louis C, Jr. & Isabel K. 


8,600 


498.80 


Farrar, Edith B. 


100 


5.80 


Faunce, Mary Gill & Anthony 


11,000 


638.00 


Faunce, Anthony & Mary Gill 


200 


11.60 


Fedock, Metro & Hazel A. 


2,650 


153.70 


Fell, Florence C. 


5,400 


313.20 


Fillmore, Bruce R. & Eleanor L. 


4,650 


269.70 


Finesinger, Abraham L. &• Nina Wolfe 


600 


34.80 


Finnerty, James L. & Anna C. 


4,650 


269.70 


Fiorelli, Ernest R. & Rose M. 


900 


52.20 


Fitts, Charles K. & Gertrude W. 


16,500 


957.00 



159 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




700 


40.60 




2,200 


127.60 




1,000 


58.00 




8,000 


464.00 




10,600 


614. 80 




6,500 


377.00 




6,750 


391.50 




7,100 


411.80 




1,000 


58.00 




4,900 


284.20 




11,000 


638.00 


2,200 


13,600 


916.40 




4,500 


261.00 




400 


23.20 




8,700 


504.60 




2,950 


171.10 




8,750 


507.50 




5,500 


319.00 




5,500 


319.00 




5,500 


319.00 




6,000 


348.00 




7,000 


406.00 




800 


46.40 




500 


29.00 




5,000 


290.00 




9,300 


539.40 




5,000 


290.00 




5,000 


290.00 




2,500 


145.00 




6,200 


359.60 




7,800 


452.40 




8,000 


464.00 




3,000 


174.00 




4,200 


243.60 




7,000 


406.00 




6,630 


384.54 




4,500 


261.00 




2,500 


145.00 




2,500 


145.00 


800 


50 


49.30 


1,200 




69.60 




17,850 


1,035.30 




7,300 


423.40 




12,000 


696.00 




10,000 


580.00 



Flanagan, James & Wilhelmina G. 
Flannery, Donald J. & Harriet E. 
Flannery, Ralph & Constance H. 
Flannigan, John P. & Marion E. 
Fleck, Richard C. & Frances R. 
Fleming, Clifford D. & E. Frances 
Fletcher, Walter B. & Helen F. 
Flewelling, Roy S. & Thelma G. 
Flint, Edith F. 



Flint, 
Flint, 
Flint, 
Floyd, 
Flynn, 
Flynn, 
Foley, 
Foley, 



Lucie S 



& Rita E. 



& Annabell 0. 
& Ingrid E. 



George B. 

Josephine 

Warren F. 

Olive B. 

Frank J. 

Helen C. 

Harold F. 

Harold W. 
Forbes, Sherman H. 
Forsberg, Ragner W. 
Foulke, Howard V. 
Foust, James L. & Dorothy B. 
Fradd, Norman W. & Alberta A. 
Frazier, Joseph G. & Harriet E. 
Freeman, David F. & Constance C. 
Fryatt, Thomas F. 
Fuller, Ernest L. & Doris 0. 
Fullerton, Albert L., Jr. & Mary S. 

Gajewski, Ceslaus A. & Sophie 
Garland, Joseph & Mira C. 
Garrison, David L. & Alice E. 
Garrison, John B. & Barbara F. 
Gary, John E. & Maida F. 
Gerson, Nathaniel C. & Sareen R. 
Gertz, George L. & Edith A. 
Gibbs, Norman E. & Emma M. 
Giblin, Mary E. & Ruth E. 
Gilbert, George H. & Rebecca A. 
Gilbert, John W. & Josephine L. 
Gilbert, Mary J. 
Giles, E. W. Inc. 
Gilbert & Polhamus 
Giles, Edmund W. & Muriel H. 
Giles, Thomas T. & Stella A. 
Gilfoy, Donald A. & Helen B. 
Giurleo, James M. & Mary C. 



160 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


19,000 


1,102.00 


A, 200 


243.60 


4,500 


261.00 


11,000 


638.00 


2,000 


116.00 


3,700 


214.60 


7,600 


440.80 


2,900 


168.20 


11,600 


672.80 


4,700 


272.60 


19,100 


1,107.80 


9,500 


551.00 


6,500 


377.00 


9,200 


533.60 


9,000 


522.00 


H,500 


841.00 


5,300 


307.40 


7,000 


406.00 


4,500 


261.00 


10,600 


614.80 


10,950 


635.10 


4,300 


249.40 


3,850 


223.30 


5,000 


290.00 


3,000 


174.00 


1,400 


81.20 


1,500 


87.00 


7,000 


406.00 


1,000 


58.00 


4,800 


278.40 


4,600 


266.80 


7,450 


432.10 


5,000 


290.00 


1,100 


63.80 


1,100 


63.80 


2,950 


171.10 


2,500 


145.00 


6,600 


382.80 


4,500 


261.00 


500 


29.00 


1,750 


101.50 


4,400 


255.20 


1,600 


92.80 


200 


11.60 


1,000 


58.00 



Glazier, L. Gordon & Gertrude 
Gordon, Marie C. 
Gounaris, Thomas X. & Jean G. 
Grabill, Elliott V. & Martha L. 
Graf, Malcolm 
Grason, Rufus L. & Edna B. 
Gray, Robert W. 
Greaves, Allan W.& Theresa D. 
Greene, Frederick H., Jr. & Helen H. 
Greenewalt, David & Katharine R. 
Greer, Frederick W. & Eleanor F. 
Gregg, Earl F. & Doris H. 
Griffin, Harriet S. 
Griffin, Allen A. & Ruth W. 
Grinnell, William L. & Virginia B. 
Gropius, Walter & Use 
Gross, T. A. 0. & Judith C. F. 
Gustafson, Craig S. & Louise M. 
Gustafson, Edwin Anton & Doris 
Margaret 

Haartz, John C, Jr. & Beatrice R. 

Haden, Russell L., Jr. & Constance J, 

Hagenian, Joseph C. & Irene R. 

Hagmann, Anna, Extrx. 

Hagmann, Otto & Katherine 

Hagerty, Julia C. 

Hale, Hazen G., Jr. & Gail Robinson 

Haley, Arthur E. 

Hall, Cecil E. &■ Nancy E. 

Halsey, William A. & Leila W. 

Hamilton, Harry A. & Bessie E. 

Hammond, Gertrude M. 

Hankey, Francis W. & Edna J. 

Hanlon, Albert W. 

Hanson, August R. H. & Evelyn L. M. 

Hanson, Adler M. & Madeline A. 

Hapgood, Norman, Jr. & Ruth K. 

Harding, Catherine 

Hardy, Harriet L. 

Harling, Ernest J. & Marion A. 

Haroian, Henry & Jessie S. 

Harrington, F. Frank, Estate of 

Harrington, Winthrop W. 

Harrison, George R. & Florence K. 

Hart, Frederick R. 

Hart, Joseph S. 



161 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


9,000 


522.00 


3,700 


214.60 


6,000 


348.00 


300 


17.40 


5,700 


330.60 


5,000 


290.00 


34,400 


1,995.20 


10,500 


609.00 


1,850 


107.30 


4,200 


243.60 


20,400 


1,183.20 


6,600 


382.80 


6,400 


371.20 


5,000 


290.00 


4,640 


269.12 


4,500 


261.00 


5,500 


319.00 


10,000 


580.00 


3,300 


191.40 


12,200 


707.60 


13,650 


791.70 


1,000 


58.00 


9,500 


551.00 


5,000 


290.00 


6,300 


365.40 


100 


5.80 


9,500 


551.00 


5,500 


319.00 


7,000 


406.00 


7,300 


423.40 


3,800 


220.40 


2,400 


139.20 


10,300 


597.40 


5,500 


319.00 


9,100 


527.80 


3,700 


214.60 


400 


23.20 


10,600 


614.80 


4,350 


252.30 


3,600 


208.80 


3,000 


174.00 


4,000 


232.00 


10,550 


611.90 


9,100 


527.80 


1,600 


92.80 


8,500 


493.00 



Hart, William E. & Isabella C. 

Hartman, Henry F. 

Haworth, George G. & Thelma E. 

Hayden, Nellie B. 

Healey, Harry R., Jr. & Jeanne C. 

Heavens, K. Bardwell & Suzanne M. 

Heck, Mary Higbee 

Hedge, Mary A. 

Helburn, Peter & Margaret 

Held, Arnold E. & Mary A. 

Henderson Foundation 

Henderson, Gerard C. & Edith M. 

Henderson, Mary S. 

Henderson, Robert S. & Carolyn H. 

Henley, Archibald & Lottie 

Henley, Merrill J. & Ida H. 

Hennessy, Frank J., Jr. & Pauline G. 

Henry, Hall M. & Addie McAllister 

Herlihy, Maurice K. & Jean E. 

Herman, Edwards W. 

Herthel, Stephen W. & Evelyn S. 

Hess, John L. & Barbara L. 

Hess, Kenneth W. & Alice B. 

Hester, Leon B. & Mary B. 

Hill, Walter L. & Patricia C. 

Hinds, Edward H. & Edith M. 

Hoar, George W. & Norman W. 

Holbrow, Frederick & Florence G. 

Hollingsworth, Lowell M. & Florence S, 

Hoover, Henry B. & Lucretia J. 

Houghton, John J. & Lillian 

Howard, Elizabeth F. 

Howard, Esther T. 

Hoyt, Harrison & Shirley J. 

Hubbard, Eliot, Jr. 

Hunt, Lewis E. 

Hunt, Pearson 

Hunt, Pearson & Merrill T. 

Huntley, George F. & Lottie D. 

Huntley, Medford E. & Blanche L. 

Huntley, Oland F. & Alberta T. 

Hunt, Hope 

Hurd, Joseph & Nellie M. 

Hurd, Nancy Dabney 

Hurff , Joseph L. & Elizabeth C. 

Hyde, Benjamin D. & Mildred B. 



162 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


4,100 


237.80 


13,500 


783.00 


12,000 


696.00 


6,600 


382.80 


15,000 


870.00 


6,750 


391.50 


6,500 


377.00 


4,200 


243.60 


5,500 


319.00 


8,500 


493.00 


3,100 


179.80 


5,100 


295.80 


4,600 


266.80 


1,500 


87.00 


7,550 


437.90 


12,000 


696.00 


3,000 


174.00 


150 


8.70 


4,300 


249.40 


1,000 


58.00 


5,500 


319.00 


3,750 


217.50 


1,000 


58.00 


5,000 


290.00 


4,200 


243.60 


1,100 


63.80 


3,200 


185.60 


5,800 


336.40 


500 


29.00 


150 


8.70 


6,500 


377.00 


4,500 


261.00 


6,500 


377.00 


5,450 


316.10 


15,700 


910.60 


8,500 


493.00 


2,000 


116.00 


7,750 


449.50 


5,000 


290.00 


11,700 


678.60 


4,500 


261.00 


500 


29.00 


2,000 9,100 


643.80 


5,000 


290.00 



Ingard, K. Uno & Doris C, 
Irwin, Mary M. 



& Sallie 

Miriam H. 
& Waleska E. 
Tufts, Elizabeth F. 
& Katrina C. 



Jackson, Dorothy W. 

Jackson, Gardner, Jr 

Jacobs, May L. 

Jagger, James M. & 

James, Hamilton R. 

Jaroch, Ellen G. & 

Jenney, Charles J. 

Jenney, Phyllis M. 

Jensen, Holger J. & Grace A. 

Jensen, Olin A. & Agnes E. 

Jillson, Robert F. & Frances Horton 

Johansen, Rose May 

John, DeWitt 

Johnson, Ernest L. & Grace M. 

Johnson, Fern A., Estate of 

Johnson, John W. & Josephine 

Johnson, Winston H. & Dorothy L. 

Jones, Ira M. & Katherine A. 

Jozwicki, Alfons & Adeline C. 

Kane, Henry B. & Elizabeth C. 

Kasperian, Karl D. & Carol 0. 

Keene, Clifton R. 

Keily, Delbar P.& Gertrude E. 

Keizer, Harold 

Kelliher, John J,, 

Kennedy, Albert E. 

Kennedy Brothers 

Kennedy, John T. 

Kessel, Joseph B 

Keyes, Janet T. 

Kidder, George H 

Kindleberger, Charles P 

King, William T. 

Kingsbury, Roy S. & Ann B. 

Kinney, Robert C. 

Kinsler, Herman F. & Louise M. 

Kirkpatrick, David W. & Margaret M 

Kistiakowsky, George B. & Irma E. 

Kling, John W. & Louise 

Knight, Geoffrey, Jr. & Rita A. 

Knowles, Harry B. 

Knowles, Wilma E. 



Estate of 



& Albert E. 
, & Lesley J. 

, & Ellen W. 

& Sarah M. 



163 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




3,030 


175.74 




10,700 


620.60 




5,500 


319.00 




6,000 


348.00 




1,500 


87.00 




3,200 


185.60 




5,000 


290.00 




5,000 


290.00 




7,000 


406.00 




5,900 


342.20 




3,000 


174.00 




4,550 


263.90 




2,150 


124.70 




4,750 


275.50 


1,000 


8,750 


565.50 




5,100 


295.80 




15,200 


881.60 




9,000 


522.00 




2,500 


145.00 




1,800 


104.40 




6,500 


377.00 




3,850 


223.30 




7,000 


406.00 




2,850 


165.30 




3,800 


220.40 


500 


1,800 


133.40 




3,500 


203.00 




4,750 


275.50 




4,600 


266.80 




6,700 


388.60 




6,000 


348.00 




13 , 200 


765.60 


1,000 




58.00 


250 




14.50 




5,000 


290.00 




5,300 


307.40 


500 




29.00 




7,600 


440.80 




3,800 


220.40 




5,000 


290.00 




6,500 


377.00 




5,275 


305.95 




1,300 


75.40 




10,000 


580.00 




8,000 


464.OO 



Kolyshkin, George 
Kopp, Jay F. & Marilyn J. 
Korhonen, Edwin J. & Onerva M. 
Kubik, Charles S. & Emily K. 

Lahey, Heirs of James 

Lahnstein, Karl F. 

Lancashire, George F. & Dorothy C. 

Lang, Richard E. & Betty Lee 

Langton, William G. 

Larrabee, Leonard C. & Peggy S. 

Larson, John B. & Mafalda M. 

Larzelere, William & Alice Josephine 

Lavrakas, Fofo 

Lawrence, Lincoln C. & Blanche P. 

Lawson, Harold E. 

Lawton, John J. & Beatrice G. 

Leathern, Ernest F. & Evelyn K. 

Leavitt, Donald P. & Christine P. 

LeBlanc, Alphonse J. & Alice M. 

Lee, Edwin John 

Lee, Joseph D. & Barbara B. 

Leger, Mary E. 

Leraander, William C. & Emily K. 

LeMann, John 

Lennon, James V. & Elin 

Leslie Farm, Inc. 

Leslie, Maurice A. & Annie 

Leslie, Paul M. 

Levin, Alvin & Betty 

Liddick, Harold S. & Virginia D. 

Light, Galen D., Jr. & Lois McClure 

Lillie, Douglas G. & Hilda F. 

Lincoln Auto Service, Inc. 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 

Lincoln Heights Estates, Inc. 

Lincoln, John W. & Clarinda Y. 

Lindsay, Nicholas 

Litte, Rudolph 

Livengood, Eleanor C. H. 

Loesel, Robert A. & Marybell 

Loomis, David & Paulette C. 

Lorrey, Mildred J. 

Lothrop, John W. & Ellen D. 

Loud, John F. & Mary L. 

Loveys, Donald C. & Harriet E. 



164 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




5,250 


304.50 




2,600 


150.80 




5,750 


333.50 




1,600 


92.80 




3,600 


208.80 




3,700 


214.60 




4,450 


258.10 




3,330 


193.14 




9,200 


533.60 




2,750 


159.50 




3,050 


176.90 




12,000 


696.00 




11,000 


638.00 




14,300 


829.40 




4,350 


252.30 




2,850 


165.30 




1,100 


63.80 




1,100 


63.80 




5,500 


319.00 




8,000 


464.OO 




3,200 


185.60 




5,500 


319.00 




2,600 


150.80 




10,000 


580.00 




1,300 


75.40 




11,200 


649.60 




11,700 


678.60 




2,300 


133.40 




4,700 


272.60 




5,200 


301.60 




5,300 


307.40 




9,200 


533.60 




14,300 


829.40 




5,000 


290.00 




4,500 


261.00 




8,000 


464.OO 




13,000 


754.00 




4,700 


272.60 




15,500 


899.00 




5,500 


319.00 




12,500 


725.00 




9,500 


551.00 




5,000 


290.00 




6,000 


348.00 




500 


29.00 



Lummus, John W. & Ann A. 

Lunt, Heirs of Charles 

Lustwerk, Ferdinand 

Lutnicki, Victor A. & Harriet H. 

Lynch, Edward H., Jr. 

Lyon , Ruth 

Lyons, John J. & Ann V. 

Lyons, Martin & Winifred A. 

MacDonald, Everett A. & Ethel W. 
MacFarland, Charles C. & Phyllis M. 
Maclnnis, Daniel A. Jr. & Francis 

Clarke 
Mackenzie, Roland C. 
Maclaurin, Richard Colin & Ellen 
Maclaurin, W. Rupert & Elfriede C. 
MacLean, Heirs of Hector J. 
MacLeod, Edward & Hester M. 
MacLeod, Edward, Jr. & Mary M. 
MacLeod, Frederick H. 
MacRae, Manning W. &• Nina W. 
Mahan, Russell P. & Anastasia 
Mahar, Raymond & Gertrude M. 
Mahoney, Gerald J. & Jeanne M. 
Mallett, Herbert A. & Eva M. 
Malloy, Robert M. & Irene C. 
Malone , Charles 
Mann, David W. 
Mann , David W . , Inc . 
Mannarino, Heirs of Anna 
Manning, Joseph J. & Catherine L. 
Manzelli, John 
Mar, James W. & Edith 
Marchetti, John W. & Sarah G. 
Maroni, Robert F. & Valentine R. 
Martin, Fred & Marie 
Martin, John 0. & Candida W. 
Martini, William F. & Virginia J. 
Mascari, Leonard E. & Grace B. 
Mason, Hayden & Jean C. 
Mass, Joseph & Henrietta 
Maxner, James 0. & Dorothy R. 
McClennen, Alan & Louise H. 
McCune, William J. & Elizabeth 
McDonald , Claire 
McHugh, Mary F. 
McHugh, Katherine 



165 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


9,000 


522.00 


2,400 


139.20 


400 


23.20 


1,400 


81.20 


3,250 


188.50 


4,100 


237.80 


500 


29.00 


3,500 


203.00 


5,000 


290.00 


3,150 


182.70 


10,400 


603.20 


4,000 


232.00 


4,600 


266.80 


12,350 


716.30 


5,000 


290.00 


4,400 


255.20 


6,500 


377.00 


5,800 


336.40 


18,000 


1,044.00 


2,600 


150.80 


8,300 


481.40 


5,500 


319.00 


3,650 


211.70 


5,050 


292.90 


8,800 


510.40 


47,000 


2,726.00 


7,100 


411.80 


10,550 


611.90 


10,000 


580.00 


12,700 


736.60 


100 


5.80 


9,000 


522.00 


4,750 


275.50 


4,500 


261.00 


7,500 


435.00 


10,040 


582.32 


21,000 


1,218.00 


2,400 


139.20 


3,700 


214.60 


4,500 


261.00 


2,500 


145.00 


500 


29.00 


5,500 


319.00 


16,100 


933.80 


3,050 


176.90 


6,500 


377.00 


2,800 


162.40 



McKennan, William & Alice W. 

McKnight, David B. & Eleanor J. 

McKnight, Ernest Tilley 

McKnight, Wilmot & Katherine E. 

McLellan, John W. & Julia C. 

McMillin, James B. 

McMurtry, George C. & Rose Mary 

Meade, Edmund J. & Eleanor H. 

Meade, Varnum R. & Janice H. 

Medwin, Inc. 

Meiss, Millard & Margaret L. 

Melanson, Leonard J. & Mary 

Mellish, Eugene D. & Nancy 

Meriam, Richard S. & Alice G. 

Merrill, Vincent N. & Anne S. 

Messina, Ja spare & Grazia 

Meyer, John R. , Jr. & Marjorie R. 

Meyer, Robert V. 

Militzer, Raymond E. & Martha B. 

Millar, Philip N. & Winifred M. 

Miller, Henry D. & Mary E. 

Miller, Mary G. 

Mills, Cecil R. & Lillian M. 

Mix, Thomas R. & Helen B. 

Molina, Henry J., Jr. & Edith D. 

Monks, John P. & Ann S. 

Moody, Charles P. & Josephine G. 

Moor, Edgar J. & Joan K. 

Moore, Herbert L., Jr. & Sylvia W 

Moore, Laurence & Eleanor 

Moore, Paul 

Moore, Robert L. & Dorothy H. 

Morette, Walter J. & Gertrude C. 

Morey, Kenneth & Ruth I. 

Morgan, Henry M. & Gwen G. 

Morgan, Winfield S. & Catherine R 

Mornings id e , Inc . 

Morris, Milliage E. & Beatrice M. 

Morris, Robert E. F. & Clara D. 

Morris, Robert H. & Irene S. 

Morriss, Benham E. & Ardis G. 

Morrissey, Elizabeth Ann 

Morrissey, John Joseph 

Morse, Thomas R. 

Morse, William H. & Marguerite D. 

Moses, John P. & Alice W. 

Moszka, Stanley E. &• Anna 



166 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Tel. Co. 
& Sylvia B, 



Mukhitarian, Samuel & Stephanie 
Mullins, Edward S. & Florence M. 
Murphy, Bridget 
Murphy, Cyrus W. & Persis S. 
Murphy, Daniel J. & Louise C. 
Murphy, Edward W. 
Murphy, Mina Dorothea 
Murphy, William F. & Ruth M. 
Myles, Theresa Anne & J. Richard 

Natoli, Donald J. & Lois M. 

Neary, Patrick J. & Alice B. 

Nelson, Albert E. & Marjorie E. 

Nelson, Erik J. & Dorothy G. 

Nelson, W. Newton & Eleanor R. 

Nesto, Bruno Richard & Eugenia Rita 

Neville, Ellen M. , Heirs of 

Neville, Mary A. & Delia M. 

Newbold, Thomas 

New England Tel. & 

Neumann, Ernest P. 

Newell, Lena M. 

Newman, Philip & Elsa L. 

Newton, Harland B. & Ethel A. 

Newton, Hazel H. 

Nichols, Walter & Ethel D. 

Nicholson, Robert F. & Julia M. 

Niles, Robert I. & Virginia M. 

Norton, Paul L. 

Norton, Paul L. & Margaret 

Nystrom, Foster H. & Edna C. 

Nunez, Vasco E., Jr. & Llewellyn G. 

Ogden, David D. & Joan A. 

Ogden, Warren G., Jr. 

O'Leary, Paul J. & Alice M. 

Olmsted, Harriet A. 

Olsen, Ralph & Marcia E. 

O'Reilly, Joseph J. & Camilla M. 

Osborne, Gordon & Freda W. 

0' Sullivan, William J. & Mary E. 

Owen, Carlton Owen 

Owen, Charles J. & Mary Lee 

Paddock, Louis E. & Ann E. 
Page, Elliott F. & Emily R. 
Page, Stanley W. & Elisabeth H. 



125,700 



4,050 


234.90 


250 


14.50 


4,500 


261.00 


4,900 


284.20 


4,550 


263.90 


4,750 


275.50 


3,500 


203.00 


10,750 


623.50 


3,600 


208.80 


6,800 


394.40 


4,200 


243.60 


5,900 


342.20 


4,500 


261.00 


15,450 


896 ao 


7,200 


417.60 


500 


29.00 


4,000 


232.00 


11,550 


669.90 




7,290.60 


9,750 


565.50 


5,850 


339.30 


4,150 


240.70 


6,800 


394.40 


5,500 


319.00 


5,100 


295.80 


2,800 


162.40 


7,500 


435.00 


1,500 


87.00 


6,500 


377.00 


6,000 


348.00 


9,350 


542.30 


8,900 


516.20 


6,000 


348.00 


12,200 


707.60 


16,000 


928.00 


4,800 


278.40 


3,800 


220.40 


19,940 


1,156.52 


18,500 


1,073.00 


8,100 


469.80 


6,000 


348.00 


7,000 


406.00 


4,400 


255.20 


4,900 


284.20 



167 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Page, William N. & Elizabeth J. 

Paine, Albert S. & Noelle W. 

Paine, Charles M. 

Palioca, Wayne B. & Ethel R. 

Pallotta, Henry & Eleanor A. 

Palmer, Attelio A. & Kathryne 

Palmer, Eleanor M. 

Palmer, George B., Jr. & Rosemary S. 

Panetta, Franklin & Theresa 

Panetta, James J. & Rosemary D. 

Panetta, Pasquale 

Panetta, Pasquale & Mary 

Panetta, Salvatore & Rita 

Paquette, Margaret 

Parish, Edward C, Jr. & Joan DeF. 

Parker, Jackson B. & Jacqueline S. 

Parks, Henry A. & Harriett A. 

Pattinson, Mary I. 

Paulsen, Jack W. & Suzanne P. 

Pavlo, Samuel G. 

Pearmain, William Robert & Claire P. 

Peavy, Leopold, Jr. & Elizabeth J. 

Peck, Mildred E. 

Pederson, Sarah A. 

Peirce, Harriet T. 

Peloquin, Roy J. & Alice W. 

Pertzoff , Constantin A. & Olga 

Pertzoff, Olga 

Peterson, Frank W. & Mary E. 

Peterson, George E. & Bertha S. 

Pettit, Kathreen N. 

Phillips, Henry B. & Charlotte T. 

Pierce, Charles Eliot & Dora Redway 

Poor, Jane H. & Fitch, Marion, d/b/a 

Hartwell Farm 
Poor, Jane H. & Fitch, Marion A. 
Porter, Stanley D. & Josephine 
Post Office Shop 
Powell, Neil H. & Annie L. 
Powers, Richard E. 
Powers, William C. & Clara E. 
Pratt, Nancy A. 
Prescott, Ruth B. 
Preston, Jean W. 
Primak, John 
Primak, John & Lena 





8,000 


464.00 




100 


5.80 




150 


8.70 




8,200 


475.60 




4,500 


261.00 




4,600 


266.80 




7,500 


435.00 




7,500 


435.00 




100 


5.80 




3,950 


229.10 


300 




17.40 




5,900 


342.20 




4,500 


261.00 




250 


14.50 




6,900 


400.20 




6,100 


353.80 




2,300 


133.40 




6,600 


382.80 




6,500 


377.00 




400 


23.20 




5,750 


333.50 




21,300 


1,235.40 




3,850 


223.30 




1,100 


63.80 




4,200 


243.60 




4,800 


278.40 




50,940 


2,954.52 




7,800 


452.40 




5,100 


295.80 




5,250 


304.50 




5,000 


290.00 




16,450 


954.10 




10,800 


626.40 


1,000 




58.00 




12,500 


725.00 




8,500 


493.00 


400 




23.20 




8,850 


513.30 




4,500 


261.00 




5,600 


324.80 




550 


31.90 




200 


11.60 




24,000 


1,392.00 


300 




17.40 




11,200 


649.60 



168 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


. ■ Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Quarton, Gardner & Frances 



16,830 



976. U 



Rice, 
Rice, 
Rice, 
Rice, 
Rice, 



& Blanche C. 
C. 
, W. & Anna H. 



Ragan, Ralph R. 

Ragan, Ralph R. & Ruth M. 

Ralston, Robert 

Rand, Lucy K. 

Rand, William M. & Priscilla W. 

Rando, Giovanina 

Rando, Philip 

Reed, Kenneth C. & Margaret M. 

Ricci, Joseph, Louis, Fred & Charles 

Rice, Arthur W., Jr. & Pauline K. 

Earl S. & Naoma F. 

James F. , Jr. & Barbara A. 

Richard B. & Grace W. 

Ruth D. 

Ruth D. 
Richards, Henry J. 
Richardson, Howard 
Richardson, John A, 
Richardson, Lyle 
Riley, Allston & Marion 
Riley, William B. & Mary M. 
Ritson, David M. & C. Edda 
Robbins, Roland W. & Gerald ine 
Robey, A. Alexander & Harriet Stevens 
Robichaud, George V.& Emma 
Robinson, Dora J. 
Robinson, Morris R. & Mary 
Robus, Tamzin K. 
Rodiman, Mildred M. 
Rodiman, Mildred M. 
Rodrick, William D. 
Rogers, Edward H. 
Rogers, John H. 
Rollins, Barbara 
Rollins, Elmer A. 
Rollins, J. Leslie & 
Rollins, Oliver W. & 
Rood, Allan & Jane 
Rooney, Edward D. & Elizabeth M. 
Rooney, John J. & Margaret C. 
Root, Harriet E. 
Root, Lily Frederica 
Ross, William C. & Marian L. 
Rouner, Thomas J. &. Doris J. 
Row, Ronald V. & Jane E. 



800 



200 



Clark C. 
Alice E. 



Estate of 



Barbara 
Hala P. 



200 


11.60 


5,000 


290.00 


8,300 


481.40 


16,400 


951.20 


6,000 


348.00 


6,450 


374.10 




46.40 


8,100 


469.80 


5,050 


292.90 


12,200 


707.60 


6,400 


371.20 


3,400 


197.20 


5,700 


330.60 




11.60 


7,100 


411.80 


3,500 


203.00 


200 


11.60 


9,550 


553.90 


13,000 


754.00 


10,600 


614.80 


1,900 


110.20 


500 


29.00 


3,000 


174.00 


10,800 


626.40 


16,500 


957.00 


3,500 


203.00 


3,900 


226.20 


2,500 


145.00 


1,000 


58.00 


3,550 


205.90 


6,300 


365.40 


19,000 


1,102.00 


7,500 


435.00 


500 


29.00 


800 


46.40 


7,900 


458.20 


7,500 


435.00 


6,400 


371.20 


5,300 


307.40 


1,500 


87.00 


600 


34.80 


3,350 


194.30 


10,200 


591.60 


8,250 


478.50 


4,900 


284.20 



169 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


1,700 


98.60 


6,500 


377.00 


3,800 


220.40 


3,400 


197.20 


5,000 


290.00 


5,750 


• 333.50 


4,000 


232.00 


100 


5.80 


3,500 


203.00 


2,4-00 


139.20 


4,000 


232.00 


6,500 


377.00 


. 15,200 


881.60 


4,500 


261.00 


7,000 


406.00 


350 


20.30 


1,125 


65.25 


4,100 


237.80 


6,000 


348.00 


200 


11.60 


6,500 


377.00 


5,700 


330.60 


2,510 


145.58 


1,150 


66.70 


7,450 


432.10 


8,500 


493.00 


21,400 


1,241.20 


2,500 


145.00 


6,700 


388.60 


4,000 


232.00 


6,500 


377.00 


2,100 


121.80 


5,600 


324.80 


5,500 


319.00 


600 


34.80 


19,600 


1,136.80 


500 


29.00 


4,500 


261.00 


5,000 


290.00 


4,650 


269.70 


9,800 


568.40 


500 


29.00 


5,250 


304.50 


1,500 


87.00 


6,000 


348.00 



Rowe, Lawrence L. & Mildred M. 

Rowe, Stand ish S. 

Roy, Nancy C. 

Rufo, John &■ Helen L. 

Ruocco, Ralph J. A. & Isabel I. 

Russell, James D. & McPartland, 

Marguerite 
Ryan, James J. & Helen 
Ryan, Frank A. 
Ryan, Lawrence 
Ryan, Mary A. 
Ryan, Mary J. 
Ryer, Russell E. & Margaret C. 

Sagendorph, Mrs. J. Hansell 

Sample, Wilbur H. & Joan G. 

Sampson, Coleman W. & Phyllis Elizabeth 

Santangelo, Laura B. & John 

Satterfield, Charles N. & Anne P. 

Sautter, Louis E. & Mildred E. 

Sawtell, Clement C. & Adelaide I. 

Schaal, Albert A. & Zelpha M. 

Schirmer, Ruth A. 

Schlaifer, Robert 0. 

Schumacher, August 

Schumacher, August & Mary L. 

Schwann, William 

Scott, Hermon H. 

Scott, Robert W. 

Sec or a, Julia 

Seeckts, E. William 

Seeckts, Marion E. «• Ehlert W. 

Segadelli, Doris C. & John J. 

Sexton, Maurice J. 

Shambaugh, Benjamin & Joan D. 

Shank, Maurice E. &■ Virginia 

Shapiro, Ascher H. & Sylvia C. 

Shaw, Alice DeS. 

Shaw, Harold & Ethel C. 

Shea, Catherine E., Estate of 

Shea, William J. & Margaret T. 

Shepard, Paul F. 

Sherman, Daniel E. 

Sherman, D. Everett, Jr. 

Sherman, Daniel E., Jr. & Sadie J. 

Sherwin, Edward V. 

Shomphe, Patrick W. & Annie B. 



170 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




200 


17. 4< 




1,300 


75. 4< 




4,200 


243. 6< 




1,750 


101. 5< 


5,400 


18,250 


1,371.7( 




5,300 


307. 4< 




100 


5.8< 




1,700 


98. 6< 




10,800 


626. 4< 




5,000 


290.01 




6,200 


359. 6( 




5,500 


319.0i 




4,500 


26l.0i 


900 


55,700 


3,282.8i 




5,500 


319.0! 




3,900 


226.2i 




2,700 


156.6 




2,150 


124.7! 




4,100 


237.8! 




4,300 


249.41 




4,500 


261.0! 




750 


43.5! 




4,050 


234.9! 




4,250 


246.5' 




6,000 


348.0' 




11,500 


667.0! 




3,800 


220.4" 




5,000 


290. 0< 




4,100 


237.81 




5,250 


304. 5< 




1,000 


58.0( 




6,000 


348.0) 




1,750 


101. 5< 




8,200 


475. 6( 




5,250 


304. 5< 




5,000 


290.0( 




5,900 


342.21 




5,200 


301. 6( 




3,500 


203. 0( 




1,200 


69. 6( 




5,400 


313. 2( 


1,500 




87. 0( 




2,300 


133. 4( 




6,350 


368. 3( 




7,100 


411. 8( 




12,500 


725. 0( 



Shrock, Robert R. 

Shurling, Watson & Emily I. 

Siler, William C. &■ Barbara Jean 

Silva, Manuel, Jr. 

Silva, Mary E. 

Simonds, Anthony J. 

Simonds, Lena J. 

Sims, Mildred A. 

Sis son, John H. & Barbara 

Skilton, Edna R. 5- McDermott, Pauline F. 

Small, William A. & Dolina N. 

& Florence C. 

& Patricia Ann 



Smith, 
Smith, 



Carl D. 

John E. 
Smith, Sumner 
Smith, William B. «• Mae W. 
Smith, William B. & Mary W. 
Smith, William J. & Barbara J. 
Smith-Petersen, Hilda D. 
Snelling, Charles A. 
Snelling, Dorothy R. 
Snelling, Howard & Elizabeth J. 
Snider, Joseph L. & Greta W. 
Sorenson, Hans, Heirs of 
Sorenson, J. Oscar 
Spence, Robert A. & Helen M. 
Spencer, Henry W. & Marguerite G. 
Spooner, Frederick C. &- Sarah W. 
Spooner, Kenneth 0. & Vera H. 
Spooner, Lily T. 
Stahleker, Carl & Edith H. 
Sterner, John 

Stevens, Kimball C. 5- Eleanor G. 
Stockellburg, Arthur A. 
Stratford Realty Co., Inc. 
Street, Earle B. 8- Janet H. 
Striker, William W. & Marjorie B. 
Sturgis, Alanson H., Jr. & Anne H. 
Sturm, Henry A., Jr. & Harriet W. 
Sullivan, Francis J. & Gladys S. 
Sullivan, Winifred P. 
Swan, Edmund & Eleanor G. 
Swanson Pontiac, Inc. 
Swanson Realty Corp. 
Swanson, Alfred & Alma 
Swanson, Arthur W. & Helen K. 
Swanson, John, Realty Corp. 



171 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


4,350 


252.30 


5,250 


304.50 


8,650 


501.70 


8,600 


498.80 


1,600 


92.80 


4,000 


232.00 


21,200 


1,229.60 


8,100 


469.80 


1,000 


58.00 


3,500 


203.00 


6,950 


403.10 


8,000 


464.00 


1,400 


81.20 


5,500 


319.00 


49,350 


2,862.30 


5,000 


290.00 


6,000 


348.00 


15,400 


893.20 


13,600 


788.80 


2,600 


150.80 


5,200 


301.60 


5,000 


290.00 


8,300 


481.40 


7,000 


406.00 


7,100 


411.80 


5,500 


319.00 


100 


5.80 


16,700 


968.60 


27,900 


1,618.20 


5,000 


290.00 


1,850 


107.30 


2,750 


159.50 


8,300 


481.40 


500 


29.00 


4,200 


243.60 


3,000 


174.00 


1,900 


110.20 


500 


29.00 


500 


29.00 


6,500 


377.00 


4,400 


255.20 


2,700 


156.60 


2,700 


156.60 


6,000 


348.00 


1,500 


87.00 



Svartz, Eli & Jeanette W. 
Sweeney, Joseph E. & Jeanne M. 
Swift, Orlando B. & Janice B. 
Swift, William N. & Phyllis C. 
Swinconeck, John J. 

Taillacq, Elsie 

Tarbell, George G. et al, Trustee 

Tarbell, George G., Jr. 

Tarky, William J., Jr. 

Tasker, Eliza J. 

Taylor, Edward S. 

Taylor, Frederick B. & Lex H. 

Teabo, Eugene R. & Alice M. 

Telling, Irving & Jane C. 

Tennessee Gas Transmission Company 

Tetreault, Arthur Hubert & Anne G. 

Tetreault, Arthur H. & Claire F. 

Tew, John B. 

Thiessen, Arthur E. 

Thomas, Melvin H. & 

Thompson, Cameron S 

Thompson, Donald 0. & Barbara Ann 

Thompson, G. Brooks, Jr. & Arlene 

Thorpe, Margaret M. 

Thorson, Robert H. & Kathryn F. 

Tirrell, Horace P. & Ethelyn S. 

Tobey, Aubrey C. & Cynthia W. 

Todd, Mabel H. 

Todd, Pauline E., Admx. 

Toler, Louise C. 

Tonseth, Didrick & Phebe 

Torode, Herbert L. & Lorraine S. 

Tracey, Elizabeth M. 

Tracey, Joseph 

Tracey, Joseph R. & Elizabeth M. 

Tracy, John W. & Gertrude G. 

Troisi, Ferdinand L. & Mary G. 

Trueworthy, Thurston C. & Helen F. 

Tucker, Gardner 

Tunnell, Raymond W. & Suzanne D. 

Turner, Charles F. & Winifred A. 

Tyler, Ethel A., Admx. 

Tyler, Watson, Heirs of 



& Laura 

Phyllis I. 

, Jr. & Nancy L. 



Umbrello, Carmel V, 
Umbrello, Francis 



& Francesca 



172 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxoaver 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Umbrello, Francis & Virginia 



8,950 



519.10 



Vance, Jane K. 

Van Leer, Hans L. 1,600 

Van Leer, Hans L. & Mary K. 

Van Wart, Walter L. & Mary A. 

Vercollone, Edmund S. & Julia 

Vitale, Joseph A. & M. Frances 

Wadsworth, Charles Y. & Virginia D. 

Waible, Wendell J. & Florence E. 

Walen, Roger S. & Constance M. 

Wales, Andrew M. & Betty R. 

Wales, Isabel G. 

Ward, Henry DeC. & Janet Clark 

Ward, Walter B. & Sophie E. 

Ward, Walter B., Jr. & Marie L. 

Ware, H. Spanton & Vivian V. 

Warner, Henrietta S. 

Warner, Henry E. 

Warner, Henry 

Warner, John Burton & Barbara K. 

Washburn, Mabel L. & Rachel W. 

Washburn, Rachel W. 

Webb, Rosella 

Welch, Vernon F. & Leatrice June 

Weld, Anne S. & Frederick C. 

Wells, George & K. W. 

Westcott, Charles W. C. & Mary 

Westcott, Vernon C. & Mary Alice 

Weston, Georgianna H. 

Whalen, William B. & Mary E. 

Western Union Tel. & Tel. Co. 2,100 

Wheeler, Elizabeth F., Ann H., Mary L. 

& Ruth A. Gale 
White, Katharine S. & John W. 
White, Robert E. & Marion J. 
Whitney, Harold A. & Consuelo V. 
Wilbor, John S. & Anne F. 
Wiley, G. Arnold & Helen 
Wilfert, Walter A. & Eleanor A. 
Wilfert, Fred J. & Eleanor M. 
Wilfert, Walter A. & Fred J., 

Eleanor A. & Eleanor M. 
Wilkie, Earl L. & Virginia A. 
Willard, Henry L. & Helen S. 
Willard, Leslie M. & Bernice L. 



18,700 


1,084.60 


900 


145.00 


11,000 


638.00 


1,600 


92.80 


6,100 


353.80 


7,100 


411.80 


18,200 


1,055.60 


5,200 


301.60 


4, 000 


232.00 


11,500 


667.00 


H,800 


858.40 


11,700 


678.60 


5,000 


290.00 


4,750 


275.50 


6,500 


377.00 


9,500 


551.00 


3,600 


208.80 


100 


5.80 


10,500 


609.00 


4,400 


255.20 


100 


5.80 


5,500 


319.00 


5,250 


304.50 


10,500 


609.00 


8,300 


481.40 


3,500 


203.00 


6,500 


377.00 


4,500 


261.00 


3,500 


203.00 




121.80 


17,150 


994.70 


13,200 


765.60 


4,800 


278.40 


5,100 


295.80 


6,900 


400.20 


10,850 


629.30 


200 


11.60 


5,400 


313.20 


600 


34.80 


4,600 


266.80 


8,000 


464.00 


4,750 


275.50 



173 



VALUATION LIST 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1956 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


4,900 


284.20 


1,300 


75.40 


6,100 


353.80 


9,100 


527.80 


5,250 


304.50 


6,500 


377.00 


9,200 


533.60 


5,000 


290.00 


27,650 


1,603.70 


3,200 


185.60 


3,200 


185.60 


5,800 


336.40 


8,200 


475.60 


5,000 


290.00 


4,500 


261.00 


4,500 


261.00 


4,950 


287.10 


5,000 


290.00 


8,600 


498.80 


420 


24.36 


6,500 


377.00 


4,800 


278.40 


3,500 


203.00 


500 


29.00 


6,000 


348.00 


600 


34.80 


3,150 


182.70 


2,350 


136.30 


1,100 


63.80 


4,530 


262.74 


5,100 


295.80 


6,500 


377.00 


2,500 


145.00 



Williams, Edwin L., Jr. 

Williamson, Elizabeth R. 

Wilson, Elizabeth 

Wilson, John Otis 

Wilson, Melvin S. & Eleanor F. 

Wilson, Montgomery S. & Mary Ann 

Wilson, William A. & Eleanor L. 

Winchell, Gordon D. & Enid M. 

Winchell, Guilbert & Evelyn 

Winchell, Guilbert S. & Amy Jane 

Witham, Arthur R. & Margaret F. 

Witherton, John R. 

Wood, Frank H. & Jeanne R. 

Wood, George A., Jr. & Nancy L. 

Wood, James D. & Ruth E. 

Wood, James & Lizzie 

Wood, 0. Chester & Hilve V. 

Wood, Robert C. & Margaret B. 

Woodington, N. Gordon & Mary L. 

Woodland Trust 

Woods, Henry A. & Barbara R. 

Woodward, Thomas M. , Jr. & Barbara L, 

Woodworth, Robert W. & Catherine S. 

Worsham, Jack L. & Charlotte A. 

Worthington, Thomas K. & Elizabeth C. 

Yagjian, Jacob & Inez 
Young, David B. & Cora S. 
Young, Edward L. 

Zarella, Joseph S. & Lillian M. 
Zdanowski, John J. & Mary A. 
Ziegler, Elmer H. & Hilda M. 
Zinck, Floyd A. & Elma W. 
Zollo, Carmen 



174 



TRUST FUNDS 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



The maturity of U. S. A. 2%% Series G bonds in 1956 and the 
availability of savings bank deposits, together with the pronounced 
rise in interest rates since the middle of the year, have provided 
an opportunity to increase income. Accordingly, as U. S. A. 2%% 
Series G bonds matured and as savings bank interest dates occurred, 
the Trust Fund Commissioners purchased a number of corporate bonds 
yielding to maturity from around 3.55 to l& depending upon the 
particular issue. 

It has been the policy of the Trust Fund Commissioners to proceed 
in this direction in a number of steps, reserving, when practicable, 
funds for later investment in the event of higher rates of interest. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Richard F. Schroeder 
William T. King 
Clement C. Sawtell 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 



175 



TRUST FUNDS 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1956 

Income received in 1956: 

Savings bank and bond interest $ 682.53 

Annuity u/w John H. Pierce 3,000.00 

Rent of Pierce house - 1955 600.00 

- 1956 (one-half) 300.00 

Well-Child Clinic fees 31.50 

Dental Clinic fees 2,154.47 

Salvation Army, for Dental Clinic 420.00 

Refund of benefits paid 

U. S. A. Series "G" bonds matured 

Withdrawn from savings bank 



842.24 



Payments per order Selectmen: 
Hospital and nursing home aid 
Medicines 
Doctors' bills 
Well-Child Clinic 
Dental Clinic 
Repairs to Pierce house 
Care of grounds 
Ambulance 



$1,445.66 

37.50 

103.00 

437.15 

2,497.01 

396.00 

175.00 

12.00 

$5,103.32 



Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 143.14 
Accrued interest paid on bonds purchased 57.25 

Bonds purchased: 

3,000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8$ due 1972 2,984.25 
3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3 5/8$ 

due 1986 2,913.75 
3,000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 3/8* 

due 1988 3,138.75 
2,000 Southern California Edison Co. 3% 

due 1965 1,905.00 
1,000 Virginia Elec. & Pwr. Co. 4 l/S% 

due 1986 1.038.75 

Cash balance at December 31, 1956 



7,188.50 

54.00 

11,000.00 

1,000.00 

$20,084.74 




Cash and Securities at December 31 « 1956 

Cash on deposit $ 2,800.53 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 2,496.65 

Provident Institution for Savings 1,374-40 

8,500 USA Series "F" due April 1, 1958, at cost 6,290.00 



176 



TRUST FUNDS 



2,700 USA Series "F" due Dec. 1, I960, at cost $ 1,998.00 

3,500 USA Series "F" due July 1, 1962, at cost 2,590.00 

2,500 USA Series "G" 2 l/2* due Nov. 1, 1959 2,500.00 

2,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip. Tr. M CC" 3* due 1961 1,995.72 

3,000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8* due 1972 2,984.25 

2,000 Great Northern Rwy Equip. Tr. 2 7/8* due I960 1,990.62 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3 5/8* due 1986 2,913.75 

3,000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 3/8* due 1988 3,138.75 

3,000 Southern California Edison Co. 3* due 1965 2,905.00 

1,000 Virginia Electric & Pwr. Co. 4 l/8* due 1986 1,038.75 

2,000 USA Series "F" due March 1, I960 1.480.00 



$38,496.42 



DeCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 
Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1956 6.51 

Interest income of 1956 653.43 
Interest credited to book value of bonds to amortize 

purchase premiums 4.34 

$664.28 

Net income paid to Town 653.43 

Cash balance at December 31, 1956 % 10.85 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1956 

Cash on deposit $ 10.85 

Cambridge Savings Bank 2,791.52 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 2,247.48 

10,000 USA Series "G" 2£* due April 1, 1958 10,000.00 

1,000 USA Series "G" 2& due Nov. 1, 1959 1,000.00 

1,000 U S Treasury 2£* due March 15, 1970-65 1,010.83 

2,000 U S Treasury Reg'd 2 3/4* due April 1, 1980-75 2,025.45 

1,000 Alabama Power Co. 3i* due Jan. 1, 1972 989.80 

1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 2 3/4* due 1975 948.30 

1,000 Baltimore &• Ohio RR Equip. Tr. M CC" 3* due Sept. 1, 1961 997.86 

1,000 Northern Pacific RR Equip. Tr. 2 3/4* due Aug. 10, 1966 989.95 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 3* due 1965 1,000.00 

1,000 Western Maryland RR 4* due 1969 1.021.43 

$25,033.47 



177 



TRUST FUNDS 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 
Ca3h Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1956 

Savings bank interest received in 1956 
Withdrawn from savings banks 



Safe deposit box rent 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Paid per order of Selectmen 

Cash balance at December 31, 1956 



$ 3.00 
92.09 
58.25 



9.07 

92.09 
60.00 



161.16 




Cash and Securities at December 31 . 1956 



Cash on deposit 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 7.82 
1,261.08 
1.878.22 

U7.12 



I 1,922.07 
1.225.05 

% 3.U7.12 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 
Cash Account 
Savings bank interest of 1956, paid to Town 



ZLM 



Savings Bank Deposits at December 31. 1956 



Middlesex Institution for Savings 
Cambridge Savings Bank 



$ 722.00 
$ 1.217.52 



178 



TRUST FUNDS 

DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1956 $ 269.29 

Interest Income for 1956 150.03 

Withdrawn from Provident Institution for Savings 1,020.13 



$1,439.-45 




Payments per order Commissioners of Trust Funds: 

July 4 Band Concert I 300.00 

Badges and rosettes 29.41 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 69.10 
Purchase of 1,000 Virginia Electric & Power Co. 

4 1/8* due 1986 1,038.75 

Accrued interest on same 1.84 

Cash balance at December 31, 1956 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1956 

Cash on deposit $ .35 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 1,050.91 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 1,304.34 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip. Tr. "CC" 3% due 1961 997.86 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 3% due 1965 1,000.00 

1,000 Virginia Electric & Power Co. 4 1/8* due 1986 1.038.75 

J5.392.21 

Accumulated income I 197.46 

Principal 5.194.75 

ti,?92.21 



179 



TRUST FUNDS 

LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
Cash Account 



Donations to Fund: 

Net proceeds of Lincoln School benefit performances $ 864.. 68 

Miss Fanny S. Campbell 1,000.00 

Mrs. Robert L. DeNormandie 250.00 

Douglas Roberts 25.00 

Pre-War July 4th Celebration Committee 80.00 

$2,219.68 

Payments per order Scholarship Fund Trustees: 
Northeastern University, for Barry G. Andrews $200.00 
Bouve Boston School, for Annie Murphy 150.00 

$350.00 

Supplies 11.60 

Deposited in Provident Institution for Savings 500.00 
Purchase of 1,000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8£ 

due Sept. 15, 1972 99A.75 1.856.35 

Cash balance at December 31, 1956 $ 363.33 



Cash and Securities at December 31 . 1956 

Cash on deposit $ 363.33 

Provident Institution for Savings 500.00 

1,000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8* due Sept. 15, 1972 994.75 



Robert L. DeNormandie Fund $ 250.00 

General Fund 1,608.08 



$ 1.858.08 



180 



TRUST FUNDS 

BEMIS LECTURE FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1956 

Interest income for 1956 from savings banks and bonds 

U. S. A. Series "G" bonds matured 

Withdrawn from Provident Institution for Savings 



Payments per order Bemis Lecture Fund trustees; 

January 6 - Charles Eggert 

February 24 - Hal Linker 

April 6 - Robert St. John 

September 21 - Capt. Irving Johnson 

October 26 - Arthur C. Clarke 

Printing and postage 
Janitor service at lectures 
Taxi for lecturer 
Film projection 



Safe deposit box rental 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Accrued interest paid on bonds purchased 

Bonds purchased: 

3,000 Federal Land Bank 3 7/8$ due Sept. 15, 

1972 
2,000 Southern California Edison 3$ due 1965 
3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power 3 5/8$ due 1986 
3,000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8$ due 1988 
1,000 Virginia Elec. & Pwr. 4 1/8$ due 1986 

Cash balance at December 31, 1956 



$ 300.00 
150.00 
250.00 
250.00 
200.00 

183.48 

12.35 

7.00 

40.00 

$1,392.83 

3.00 
45.51 
57.25 



2,984.25 
1,905.00 
2,913.75 
3,138.75 



% 1,185.10 

952.00 

11,000.00 

1,000.00 

$14,137.10 



1?i47?.Q? 
I 658.01 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1956 

Cash on deposit 
Cambridge Savings Bank 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 
Provident Institution for Savings 
3,000 USA Series "G" 2£$ due April 1, 1957, at cost 
4,800 USA Series "G" 2i$ due May 1, 1957, at cost 
1,000 USA Series "G" 2j$ due Nov. 1, 1959, at cost 
3,000 Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe RR Gen'l Mtg 4$ 1995 
3,000 Federal Land Bank 3 7/8$ due Sept. 15, 1972 
3,000 New England Power Co. 3i$ due 1961 
3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3 5/8$ due 1986 
3,000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 3/8$ due 1988 



658.01 
1,500.00 
2,028.04 

545.51 
3,000.00 
4,800.00 
1,000.00 
3,000.00 
2,984.25 
3,000.00 
2,913.75 
3,138.75 



181 



TRUST FUNDS 



3,000 Southern California Edison Co. 3% due 1965 
1,000 Virginia Electric & Power Co. 4 1/8% due 1986 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 2,905.00 
1.038.75 

♦32^12.06 

$ 672.02 
31.840. 04 

>?2 t ?12.06 



LINCOLN LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1956 
Income received in 1956: 

Julia A. Bemis Fund 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr Fund 

Codman Fund 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 

Hugh Anthony Gas kill Fund 

John H. Pierce Fund 

Philip W. Place Fund 

George Russell Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

Constance Taylor Fund 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 



Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Safe deposit box rent 
Edith B. Farrar, Librarian, income from 
John H. Pierce Fund 

Cash balance at December 31, 1956 



$ 4.26 



21.95 

2.37 
14.57 
12.79 

4.74 
34.82 

1.84 
13.79 
61.64 
39.04 
97.42 

2.36 
39.72 



$268.45 
3.00 

34-82 



347.0? 
$ 351.31 




Savings Bank Deposits at December 31. 1956 



Julia A. Bemis Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 



Accumulated 






Income 






on Deposit 


Principal 


Total 


$ 64.80 


$ 684.05 


$ 748.85 


11.34 


70.00 


81.34 



182 



TRUST FUNDS 



Codman Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 

Warren Institution for Savings 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

John H. Pierce Fund 
Cambridge Savings Bank 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



Philip W. Place Fund 
Warren Institution for Savings 

George Russell Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 
Provident Institution for Savings 



Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 
Provident Institution for Savings 
Warren Institution for Savings 



Constance Taylor Fund 
Warren Institution for Savings 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



Accumulated income on deposit 



Accumulated 
Income 
On Deposit Principal Total 



$ 22.46 $ 474.59 t 497.05 



39.02 



1.84 



54.51 



117.09 
51.06 



77.38 
51.06 
50.91 



7.81 
119.03 



397.00 436.02 



158.89 158.89 



500.00 
614.57 



61.00 



415.74 



930.00 
1.000.00 
1,930.00 



1,138.38 
1,000.00 
1.000.00 
3,138.38 



73.00 



500.00 

614. 22 



1,114.57 1,114.57 



62.84 



470.25 



1,047.09 
1.051.06 
2,098.15 



1,301.03 1,301.03 



1,215.76 
1,051.06 

1,0?0.91 
3,317.73 



80.81 



1,235.46 1,354.49 



$668.31 $11,053.71 $11,722.02 
A5.04 #.04 



$713.35 $11,053.71 $11,767.06 



183 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Recommended Budget for 1957 for General Purposes 
and for the Water Department 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town adopt for its 1957 
Budget the several appropriations listed by number and amounts in the 
attached SCHEDULE aggregating $664,632.33 for General Operating Ex- 
penses and §41,999.75 for the operation of the Water Department. 
These aggregates compare with actual expenses for 1956 as follows: 

Actual Recommended 
1956 1957 Increase 

General Expense $564,422.31 $664,632.83 $100,210.52 
Water Department 31,300.06 U,999.75 10,699.69 

Unspent appropriations for 1956 for General Purposes of $43,626.92 
were added to surplus. The Water Department added the sum of 
$28,308.82 from operations to its working balance. 

All but $686.98 of the $13,000.00 appropriated for use by the 
Finance Committee was used on 24 applications for transfer to meet 
unforeseen requirements. 

"Free cash" as certified by the State for 1957 has been set at 
$106,041.00, compared with $106,361.00 for 1956. At the annual meet- 
ing last year $65,611.21 was authorized out of that account and was 
effective in the computation of last year f s tax rate of $58.00. 

The Surplus (free cash) account was restored by the end of the 
year to approximately the same amount as at the beginning because, in 
fixing the tax rate, estimated receipts from various sources turned 
out to be low and approximately $24,000 was restored from used appro- 
priation for school addition #2 to which the Smith Legacy was applied. 

The SCHEDUIE attached provides for the use of a total of $18,000 
from Surplus on certain indicated items which are primarily outlays 
for which the Town will have reimbursement from sources other than 
local property taxes. 

The 1956 tax rate of $58.00 was applied to a total real and per- 
sonal property valuation of $6,617,000.00. This was $364,000.00 
greater than the valuation on which the $54.00 rate in 1955 was 
applied. The Committee estimates that the valuation base in 1957 will 
end up in the neighborhood of $7,000,000, so that each $7,000 of appro- 
priation at the annual meeting will be reflected to the extent of one 
dollar in the new rate. 



184 



FINANCE 



In our report last year we called attention to the increasing 
capital requirements into which we were heading. In addition to 
school construction, this is particularly true in the matter of long- 
lived equipment, for which the Town sets up no reserve accounts. Two 
of such replacements will be brought up on special articles in the 
warrant, inserted by the Selectmen, which we have discussed with them 
in considerable detail. We are in full accord as to the necessity 
as well as desirability of favorable action on them at this time and 
recommend that the cost of approximately $28,500 be taken from surplus, 

We believe that the Town should consider seriously the establish- 
ment of a Stabilization Fund as permitted by Sec. 5B of Chapter 40 of 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth and plan to make an annual appro- 
priation to it for the purchase of equipment. That Section permits 
a town to appropriate money to assist in stabilizing expenditures for 
capital requirements. The annual appropriation to a Fund, in the 
absence of permission from the State Emergency Fund Board, cannot ex- 
ceed 5 per cent of the tax levy of the previous year. It may be 
used only by a two-thirds vote of the Town, and, unless the State 
Emergency Finance Board approves of some other purpose, only for the 
purposes for which the Town can borrow money under Chapter 40. 

It is our opinion that good business judgment would suggest that 
our surplus account should be maintained at about 10% of the budgeted 
operating expenses of $665,000. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Russell L. Haden, Jr. 

Leonard Iarrabee 

Paul F. Norton 

William N. Page 

F. Winchester Denio, Chairman 



185 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



FINANCE 

SCHEDULE OF APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES OF 1956 
ANT) RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 1957 

Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 

1956 1956 1957 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
Selectmen. 

1. Salaries, Selectmen $ 600.00 $ 600.00 $ 600.00 

2. Executive Secretary 2,800.00 1,267.12 2,704.11 

3. Clerks 2,000.00 1,969.24 1,500.00 

4. Out of State Travel, etc. 500.00* 

5. Supplies & Misc. 1,340.00 1,556.59 1,500.00 

6. Consulting & Engineering 

Services 3,000.00 2,230.31 3.000.00 

$9,740.00 $7,623.26 15, ,804. 11 
* To be taken from Free Cash 

Treasurer. 

7. Salaries $ 400.00 $ 400.00 $ 400.00 

8. Clerical 1,000.00 925.26 1,500.00 

9. Supplies & Misc. 500.00 449.18 250.00 
Protectograph 525.00 523.50 

$2,425. 00 $2,297.94 $2,150.00 

Collector. 

10. Salary $2,000.00 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 

11. Supplies & Misc. 400.00 379.42 400.00 

$2,400.00 $2,379.42 $2,400.00 

Town Clerk. 

12. Salary $ 450.00 $ 450.00 $ 450.00 

13. Supplies & Misc. 50.00 50.00 50.00 

$ 500.00 $ 500.00 $ 500.00 

Assessors. 

14. Salaries $ 550.00 $ 550.00 $ 550.00 

15. Clerical 1,000.00 911.14 1,000.00 

16. Supplies & Misc. 725.00 805.82 800.00 



Special Clerical AOO.OO 241.30 

,675. 



$2,675.00 $2,508.26 $2,350.00 

Auditor. 

17. Salary $ 50.00 $ 50.00 $ 50.00 

Legal. 

18. Counsel $ 500.00 $ 500.00 $ 500.00 

Election and Registration. 

19. Salaries $ 500.00 $ 497.60 $ 300.00 

20. Supplies & Misc. 550.00 641.20 575.00 

$1,050.00 $1,138.80 $ 875.00 



186 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 





Appropriation 


Expenditures 


Recommendations 




1956 


1956 


1957 


Town Hall. 








21. Salaries 


$ 2,860.00 


$ 2,740.00 


$ 2,957.50 


22. Fuel 


750.00 


893.72 


900.00 


23. Repairs & Ma int. 


3,227.00 


2,929.24 


3,100.00 


24. Supplies & Misc. 


966.00 


794.90 


700.00 




$ 7,803.00 


$ 7,357.86 


$ 7,657.50 


Planning Board. 








25. Clerical & Technical 


$ 300.00 


$ 25.00 


$ 50.00 


26. Supplies & Misc. 


600.00 


507.35 


350.00 




$ 900.00 


$ 532.35 


$ 400.00 


Finance Committee. 








27. Dues 


$ 15.00 


$ 15.00 


$ 15.00 


TOTAL FOR GENERAL 








GOVERNMENT 


$28,058.00 


$24,902.89 


$26,701.51 


PROTECTION OF PERSONS 








& PROPERTY 








Police. 








28. Salaries 


$16,543.00 


$16,253.98 


$20,300.00 


29. Supplies & Misc. 


2,575.00 


3,362.66 


4.869.25 




$19,118.00 


$19,616.64 


$25,169.25 


Fire. 








30. Salaries 


$ 500.00 


$ 500.00 


$ 500.00 


31. Labor at Fires 


4,000.00 


3,218.10 


3,500.00 


32. Instruction & 








Training 






500.00 


33. Operation, Supplies 








& Equipment 


4,500.00 


3,668.33 


4,500.00 




$ 9,000.00 


$ 7,386.43 


$ 9,000.00 


Moth Department. 








34-. Insect Control 


$ 3,000.00 


$ 2,779.35 


$ 3,000.00 


Poison Ivy Control 


600.00, 


595.32 


„ 


35. Dutch Elm Disease 








& Elm Tree Removal 


4,000.00 


3,847.40 


4,000.00 


Brush Control 


500.00 
$ 8,100.00 


483.92 
$ 7,705.99 






$ 7,000.00 


Tree Warden. 








36. Salary 


$ 200.00 


$ 200.00 


$ 200.00 


37. Pruning Public Trees 


2,000.00 


1,997.10 


2,000.00 




$ 2,200.00 


$ 2,197.10 


$ 2,200.00 


Board of Appeals. 








38. Clerical 


$ 350.00 


$ 305.20 


$ 350.00 


39. Supplies & Misc. 


350.00 


332.24 


350.00 




$ 700.00 


$ 637.44 


$ 700.00 



187 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 





ectors of Building, 
bing & Wiring. 
Salaries & Transp. 

1 Defense. 
Supplies & Misc. 

uni cat ions. 
Wages 

Equipment Purchase 
Equipment Rental & 

Maintenance 
Supplies & Misc. 

L FOR PROTECTION OF 
ONS & PROPERTY 

TH & SANITATION 

d of Health. 
Salaries of Nurses 
Supplies & Misc. 
Garbage Collection 
Engineering Service 

ector of Animals. 
Salary 

L FOR HEALTH & SANITAT 


Appropriation 
1956 


Expenditures 
1956 


Recommendations 
1957 


Insp 

Plum 

40. 

Civi 

41. 

Comn 
42. 
43. 
44. 

45. 


$ 1,500.00 

$ 450.00 

$ 8,000.00 
1,375.00 

3,000.00 

1,750.00 

$14,125.00 


$ 1,102.14 

$ 237.12 

$ 7,705.00 
1,483.83 

3,401.97 

826.50 

$13,417.30 


$ 2,500.00 

$ 550.00 

$ 8,000.00 
600.00 

3,700.00 

500.00 

$12,800.00 


TOTA 
PERS 


$55,193.00 


$52,300.16 


$59,919.25 


HEAL 
Boar 

46. 

47. 

48. 

49. 


$ 2,500.50 

975.00 

3,750.00 


$ 2,500.50 
1,423.27 
3,463.94 


$ 2,440.00* 
925.00 
4,750.00** 
1,500.00 


Insp 
50. 


$ 7,225.50 

$ 100.00 


$ 7,387.71 
$ 100.00 


$ 9,615.00 
$ 100.00 


TOTA 


ION $8,325.50 


$ 7,487.71 


$ 9,715.00 



* $860.00 Add'l. to be paid by 
School Dept. 

** To be taken from Free Cash and 
returned thereto from garbage 
collection receipts. 

HIGHWAYS 

51. Chapter 90 Maintenance $ 4,500.00 $ 4,479.28 $ 4,500.00* 

52. Chapter 90 Construction 13,000.00 21,848.96 13,000.00* * 

$17,500.00 $26,328.24 $17,500.00 

* State & County share of 
$3,000 for Item 51 & 
$9,750 for Item 52 to be 
taken from Free Cash and 
returned to Free Cash 
when received. 

General Highways. 

53. Wages $16,150.00 $15,601.14 $19,200.00 

54. General Expenses 1,022.00 2,499.35 1,800.00 

55. Highway Maintenance 12,000.00 7,969.77 15,000.00 



188 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 





Appropriation 
1956 


Expenditures 
1956 


Recommendations 
1957 


56. Snow Removal 

57. Equipment, Ma int. 

& Supplies 

58. Street Lights 


$ 6,500.00 

10,200.00 
$ 45,872.00 

$ 6,252.38 


$ 8,892.12 

10.197.86 
$ 45,158.24 

$ 6,295.69 


$ 6,500.00 

8,500.00 
$ 51,000.00 

$ 6,442.02 


TOTAL FOR HIGHWAYS 


$ 69,624.38 


* 77,782.17 


? 74,942.02 


AID TO CITIZENS 
59. Public Welfare 
6C. Public Welfare Adm. 
61. Veterans 1 Aid 


$ 20,000.00 

1,000.00 

500.00 

$ 21,500.00 


$ 19,130.31 
988.04 


$ 18,000.00 
700.00 
500.00 


TOTAL FOR AID TO CITIZENS 


$ 20,118.35 


$ 19,200.00 


EDUCATION 

62. General Control 

63. Out of State Travel 

64. Instruction 

65. Operation 

66. Maintenance 

67. Auxiliary Agencies 


$ 13,030.00 

400.00 

151,187.00 

23,890.00 

3,875.00 

47,006.00 

1,165.00 

766.92 


$ 12,999.34 

280.35 

153,483.69 

23,995.16 

3,911.94 

46,718.64 

1,118.92 

1,431.48 


$ 14,685.00 

300.00 

172,555.00 

27,556.00 

7,988.00 

26,065.00 


68. Outlay 

69. New Equipment 


1,920.00 
1,800.00* 




$241,319.92 


$243,939.52 


$252,869.00 



* $698.78 to be taken from 
deCordova School Equipment 
Fund and $37.89 from the 
Grammar School Fund Income, 

Regional High School. 
70. Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 



High School District 


$ 57,164.47 


$ 57,971.47 


$121,235.80 


Library. 

71. Salaries 

72. Books 

73. Supplies & Misc. 

74. Repairs 


$ 5,086.00 

1,475.00 

1,528.00 

300.00 

$ 8,389.00 


$ 5,219.50 

1,459.90 

1,373.65 

825.00 

$ 8,878.05 


$ 5,311.00* 
1,450.00 
975.00 
670.00 

$ 8,406.00 



* $941.22 to be taken from 
County dog tax receipts 



TOTAL FOR EDUCATION $306,873.39 $310,789.04 $382,510.80 



189 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 





Appropriation 


Expenditures 


Recommendations 






1956 




1956 




1957 


RECREATION 














75. Salaries 


$ 


2,100.00 


$ 


1,805.00 


$ 


1,925.00 


76. Supplies & Misc. 




815.00 




889.87 




820.00 


77. Operation 










$ 


775.00 


TOTAL FOR RECREATION 


$ 


2,915.00 


$ 


2,694.87 


3,520.00 


CEMETERY 














78. Salaries 


$ 


150.00 


$ 


150.00 


$ 


150.00 


79. Interments 




300.00 




615.04 




500.00 


80. Labor & Ma int. 




2,825.00 




2,636.40 




2,825.00 


81. Supplies & Misc. 




120.00 




102.63 




120.00 


TOTAL FOR CEMETERIES 


$ 


3,395.00 


$ 


3,504.07 


1 


3,595.00 


UNCLASSIFIED 












82. Middlesex County 














Pension Fund 


$ 


3,429.00 


$ 


3,429.00 


$ 


3,115.99 


83. Employee Insurance 














& Hosp. Fund 













3,700.00 


84-. Property Insurance 




6,000.00 




6,000.00 




8,176.89 


85. Town Reports 




1,062.05 




1,053.99 




1,000.00 


86. Rent & Maint. of Dump 




1,750.00 




1,692.70 




1,750.00 


87. Rent of Hydrants 




3,495.00 




3,495.00 




3,495.00 


TOTAL FOR UNCLASSIFIED 


$ 15,736.05 


$ 15,670.69 


I 


17,537.88 


TOWN DEBT SERVICE 












88. School Building Bonds 


$ 33,000.00 


$ 33,000.00 


$ 


32,000.00 


89. Interest on School Bonds 


7,840.00 




7,840.00 




7,262.50 


90. Highway Equipment 














Building Bonds 




4,000.00 




4,000.00 




4,000.00 


91. Interest on Highway 














Building Bonds 




210.00 




210.00 




140.00 


92. Interest on Tax Notes 




700.00 




1,016.11 




1,500.00 


93. Water Works Bonds 




3,000.00 




3,000.00 




5,500.00** 


94. Interest on Water Works 












Bonds 


96.25 
$ 48,846.25 


f 


96.25 
49,162.36 


r 


1.388.75** 




51,791.25 


** To be taken from Water Works Treasury 










RESERVE FUND 














95. Reserve Fund 


$ 13,000.00 




* 


$ 


10,000.00 



* Transfers from 1956 Reserve Fund of 
$12,313.02 are included in expenditures 
listed above. 

TOTAL 1956 APPROPRIATIONS & 

EXPENDITURES $573,466.57 



$564,422.31 



TOTAL RECOMMENDED FOR 1957 



$664,632.83 



190 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1956 1956 1Q57 

WATER WORKS (from Water 
Works Treasury) 

96. Salaries & Wages $ 9,725.00 $ 9,456.40 $ 10,261.00 

97. Supplies, Maint. & 

Rentals 12,450.00 11,906.62 15,000.00 

98. Meters, Operating Exp. 

& Misc. 13,185.00 6,840.79 9,850.00 

99. Bond Service 3,096.25 3,096.25 6.888.75 

TOTAL FOR WATER WORKS $38,456.25 $31,300.06 $ 41,999.75 



191 



WARRANT 
1957 
NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify the 
legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town Meeting 
for the transaction of Town Affairs, to meet in the Charles S. Smith 
School in said Lincoln, on Monday the eighteenth day of March next at 
7:30 o'clock P. M. then and there to act on the following articles 
except Article 1 and also to meet at the Charles S. Smith School on 
Saturday, the 23rd day of March next, at 12 o'clock noon, then and 
there to act on the following Article 1, by posting a copy of this 
Warrant by you attested, in each of the Post Offices, and in some 
other public place in said Town seven days at least before the 
eighteenth day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Saturday, March twenty- 
third, will be open at 12 o'clock noon and may be closed at 7 o'clock 
P. M. 

A RTICLE 1. To bring in their votes for one member for each of the 
following offices: 

Moderator for three years. 

Town Clerk for one year. 

Selectman for three years. 

Assessor for three years. 

Treasurer for one year. 

Auditor for one year. 

School Committee for three years. 

Regional District School Committee for three years. 

Water Commissioner for three years. 

Board of Health for three years. 

Tree Warden for one year. 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years. 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years. 



192 



WARRANT FOR 1957 



Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 

Cemetery Commissioner for two years. 

Planning Board member for five years. 

Director of deCordova & Dana Museum for four years. 

ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, commission- 
ers, trustees, and other officers, required by law to be elected by 
ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 
elective officers of the Town and to determine whether any Department, 
Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for additional com- 
pensation any of its members and to fix additional compensation of 
such members. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To determine whether the Town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning January 1, 1958, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 17, 
Chapter UU, General laws. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $327. 41 to pay the following unpaid 1956 bills; 

Board of Health $ 6.15 

Highways 78.41 

Library 13.00 

Cemetery 172.80 

Recreation 5.75 



193 



WARRANT FOR 1957 



Water Department 2.00 

Fire Department 49.30 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Treasurer 
( Approved by the Finance Committee ) 

ARTICLE 8 . To determine whether the Town will instruct the Select- 
men to petition the Director of Accounts to install the State Account- 
ing System in accordance with Section 35, Chapter 44, General Laws as 
amended, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $7,500, or any other sum, for the purpose of 
remodeling the offices and facilities in the Lower Town Hall, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
( Finance Committee will report at Town Meeting ) 

ARTICLE 10. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $3,000, or any other sum, to replace the roof 
on the Town Hall, or take any action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
( Approved by the Finance Committee ) 

ARTICLE 11. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,750, or any other sum, for the purchase of 
a Police Cruiser to replace existing equipment, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
( Approved by the Finance Committee ) 

A RTICLE 12. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $3,283. 14, or any other sum, for replacement of 
the pump on Engine 32, or take any action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
( Approved by the Finance Committee ) 

ARTICLE 13. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $17,500, or any other sum, to purchase a new 



194 



WARRANT FOR 1957 



fire truck to replace Engine 33, or take any action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
( Approved by the Finance Committee ) 

ARTICLE 14. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,350.00, or any other sum, for the control 
of poison ivy as defined under Chapter 40, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 
( Finance Committee takes no position ) 

ARTICLE 15. To determine whether the Tbwn will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $6,500, or any other sum, for the purpose of 
continuing the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project as provided 
under Chapter 252 of the General Laws, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 
( Finance Committee takes no position ) 

ARTICLE 16. To determine whether the Town will amend the Building 
By-law of the Town by striking out the whole of said By-Law as 
amended and by substituting therefor a new building by-law, copies of 
which are on file in the office of the Inspector of Buildings, the 
Board of Selectmen and the Town Clerk, or will otherwise amend said 
Building By-Law, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 17. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500, or any other sum, to print copies of the 
new Building By-Law, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
( Approved by Finance Committee ) 

ARTICLE 18. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $2,000, or any other sum, to be used ty the 
Planning Board for consultant services for an objective study of the 
impact of light industrial and/or commercial zoning upon the Town, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 
(Approved by Finance Committee) 

ARTICLE 19. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $20,100, or any other sum, to purchase the 

195 



WARRANT FOR 1957 

following Town vehicles to replace existing equipment, or take any- 
other action relative thereto: 

1. Highway Department Truck 

2. Front End Loader (Four Wheel Drive) 

3. Pickup Truck 

Selectmen 
(Approved by Finance Committee) 

ARTICLE 20. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds in the treasury, a sum 
of money for the permanent construction of Farrar Road, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
( Finance Committee will give opinion at Town Meeting ) 

ARTICLE 21. To determine whether the Town will accept as a public 
way the private road known as Oak Knoll, as shown on plan entitled 
"Plan of land in Lincoln, Mass., Fred A. Joyce, surveyor, dated 
September 9, 1953" and filed in the land Court as Plan #20941B, a 
copy of which is filed with Certificate #79039 which is recorded with 
the Land Registration section, Middlesex South District Registry of 
Deeds, Book 525, Page 89; approved by the Planning Board of the Town 
of Lincoln, February 3, 1954, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

By Petition 

ARTICLE 22. To determine whether the Town will accept as a public 
way the private road known as Acorn lane, as shown on plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. , Rowland A. Barnes & Company, Civil 
Engineers, dated October, 1955", and filed with South Middlesex Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds as plan #2^63 of 1955, recorded in Registry 
of Deeds Book #864-4, Page 70, and approved by the Planning Board of 
the Town of Lincoln, December 30, 1955, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

By Petition 

ARTICLE 23. To determine whether the Town will vote to authorize 
the School Committee in its discretion to enter into an agreement with 
the U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate an elementary school to 
be located on L. G. Hans com Field, Cambridge Research Center, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 
(Finance Committee will give opinion at Town Meeting) 



196 



WARRANT FOR 1957 

ARTICLE 21+. To determine whether the Town will vote to acquire by 
purchase, gift, eminent domain or any other way, a parcel of land 
located on Lincoln Road, now or formerly owned by the New England Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co., containing 4400 square feet more or less, 
together with the building thereon, raise and appropriate a sum of 
money therefor, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 
(Finance Committee will give opinion at Town Meeting) 

ARTICLE 25. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to be used by the School Committee in 
renovating the Telephone Building, so-called, on Lincoln Road, for 
school purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 
(Finance Committee will give opinion at Town Meeting) 

ARTICLE 26. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,050, or any other sum for the purpose of 
transporting children to lake Walden for Red Cross swimming classes, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Recreation Committee 
(Finance Committee does not approve) 

ARTICLE 27. To determine whether the Town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $600 for permanent improvements in the Cemeteries, said 
sum to be taken from the Cemetery Improvement Fund, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Cemeterv Commissioners 
(Approved by Finance Committee) 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to conduct services on 
Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, appoint a committee, raise and 
appropriate the sum of $150, or any other sum, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
(Finance Committee takes no position) 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to celebrate Independence 
Day, the fourth of July, appoint a committee, raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1,000, or any other sum, or take any action relative there- 
to. 

Selectmen 
(Finance Committee takes no position) 



197 



WARRANT FOR 1957 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the time for the 
meeting aforesaid. Given under our hands this LVth day of February 
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and fifty-seven. 



Charles K. Fitts 
William T. King 
Elliott V. Grabill 

Selectmen of Lincoln 



198 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Report of the 



LONG-TERM CAPITAL 
REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 



Appointed by the Moderator Pursuant to 
the Vote of the Town 



1956 



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TOWN OF LINCOLN 
LONG-TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 

Summary of Conclusions and Recommendations 

1. Recent capital expenditures have varied from $39,800 in 1954 to $386,600 
in 1952 (Table 2, page 4). 

2. It is estimated that the Town will grow in population from 3,000 as at 
present to 5,500 in 1975, and from 800 houses to 1,500 (page 8). 

3. In these circumstances, the Committee recommends a program of cap- 
ital expenditures which is defined fairly precisely for the next five years. 
This program amounts to approximately $750,000 for regular governmen- 
tal functions and $170,000 for water. This program for the next 15 years 
is necessarily less definite (Table 1, opposite). 

4. This program of capital expenditures may involve a tax rate rising from 
$54 in 1955 to $64 in 1958 (Table 6, page 29). 

5. The Committee suggested that more time be devoted to planning long-term 
capital requirements, both by the Planning Board in physical terms and 
financially by future Capital Expenditures Committees which it recommends 
be appointed annually. 



Introduction 

At the 1955 regular Town Meeting, the Town voted that the Moderator 
appoint a committee of three to study the long-term capital requirements of 
the Town, with the assistance of advisory members representing the Selectmen, 
the Planning Board and the Finance Committee. The Committee was voted $100 
of expenses and required to report not later than the 1956 Town Meeting. 

On June 30, the Moderator appointed C. P. Kindleberger, W. M. Rand, 
and M. E. Shank to the Committee. The chairmen of their respective boards 
and committees appointed as advisory members: Selectmen, H. DeC. Ward; 
Planning Board, A. McClennen; and Finance Committee, C. K. Fitts. The 
Committee organized itself with W. M. Rand, Chairman, and C. P. Kindleberger, 
Clerk. 

The Committee has met with the appropriate boards and committees of 
the Town. The Committee is grateful to the members of these bodies, to 
employees and officers of the Town, and to interested citizens who have sup- 
plied information and opinions. Responsibility for the recommendations, 
however, belongs to the Committee alone. 

The Committee assumed that its task was to 

a) study the record of the Town' s capital expenditures; 

b) forecast the probable growth of the Town' s population; 

c) estimate the capital requirements of the Town, broken 
down in respect to 

i) necessity 
ii) timing 

d) furnish an indication of the financial implications of 
these expenditures in terms of initial cost, financing 
effect on current expenditures, and probable effect on 
tax rates. 

With respect to necessity, the Committee has noted those recommended 
projects which are, in its view, unavoidable, to give an idea of the minimum 
level of expenditures which the Town could anticipate. 

In timing, the emphasis has been put on the next 5 years, with, however, 
some indication of requirements in the 3 five-year periods following that. The 
first period has been broken down into separate years. 

The estimates of future capital requirements in this report are based on 
the present value of the dollar. If inflation should continue in the future as it 
has in the past -- prices of construction, for example, have risen from 100 in 
1947-49 to 126 in 1955, or at a rate of 5 per cent a year -- these estimates will 
have to be revised upward. 

Record of Capital Expenditure 

A record of capital expenditure can be compiled on the basis of expendi- 
ture on capital projects, or if the money is borrowed, on the basis of payment 
for debt service, including interest and debt repayment. This report gives both. 



The record of expenditure on capital projects is necessarily very- 
approximate for a variety of theoretical and practical reasons. Table 2 gives 
therefore only an approximate account of the capital expenditures of the Town 
for the last 10 years. Like Table 1, it is broken down to conform with the 
normal headings into which municipal expenditure in the Commonwealth is 
divided. The table, it should be noted, records expenditures only and ignores 
committments. It does not therefore include the contracted capital outlays 
required in 1956 and subsequent years by Lincoln' s participation in the Lin- 
coln-Sudbury regional school district. 

Table 3 relates these capital expenditures to the total picture of the 
Town' s finances. Subtracting the capital from total expenditures leaves an 
estimate of current expenses, including interest and repayment on previous 
borrowings. This series for current expenditures, it will be noticed, increases 
steadily from year to year with a particularly steep jump in the year 1953. The 
expenditure figures are shown pictorially, along with extraordinary receipts 
and borrowing, in Chart 1. 

Table 4 gives the Town' s debt position, along with assessed valuations 
and the tax rate. 



CHART 1 



CURRENT AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES 



Thousands 
of Dollars 

600 



□ Borrowing 

■ Extraordinary Receipts 



500 



400 



300 




200 



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Table 3 

Town of Lincoln, Expenditures 

Divided between Current and Capital Accounts, and Receipts 

(in thousands of dollars) 



Expenditure 



Current 
Selectmens Water Total Capital Expense 
Orders Dept. (1 + 2) Expend. (3 - 4) 

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) 



Current Receipts 



Collector from Common- Other 
of Taxes wealth other 
than (9 +10) 
(6) (7) (8) 



1946 


167.5 


13.7 


181.2 


22.9 


158.3 


106.3 


44.6 


12.5 


1947 


200.6 


32.2 


232.8 


62.9 


169.9 


130.6 


49.4 


21.2 


1948 


246.1 


25.7 


271.9 


56.5 


215.4 


160.3 


58.4 


17.8 


1949 


567.1 


21.2 


588.3 


345.7 


239.9 


182.8 


74.9 


19.7 


1950 


314.3 


18.6 


332.9 


72.8 


260.1 


204.6 


58.2 


22.8 


1951 


331.6 


30.7 


362.3 


63.8 


298.5 


253.4 


74.0 


27.3 


1952 


654.5 


33.4 


687.9 


386.6 


301.3 


261.5 


87.3 


29.7 


1953 


470.1 


30.1 


500.2 


89.6 


410.6 


299.3 


70.2 


27.0 


1954 


456.8 


29.4 


486.2 


39.8 


446.4 


322.8 


84.3 


35.8 


1955 


592.6 


29.0 


621.6 


110.5 


511.1 


391.5 


96.9 


33.3 



Capital Receipts 



Chapter 90 



(9) 



State 

Assistance 
for School 
Construction 
(10) 



Extraordinary 
Capital 
Receipts 
(11) 



Total 
(6 to 11) 
(12) 



Water Dept. 

Receipts 

(13) 



Total 
Receipts 
(12 + 13) 
(14) 



1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 



2.2 

7.0 
11.0 
16.0 

1.0 

8.5 
11.5 

5.0 



25.2 

5.0 

34.1 



17.0" 
5.0 b 

59.1 C 
5.4d 



3.7 e 



104.4* 



182.6 
218.2 
306.6 
298.8 
286.7 
366.9 
387.1 
443.9 
448.1 
660.2 



15.5 
15.5 
18.7 
21.9 
25.0 
26.8 
28.4 
31.2 
33.2 
39.4 



198.2 
233.7 
325.4 
320.8 
311.6 
393.6 
425.4 
470.1 
481.3 
699.6 



Notes 

Column 1 
4 
9 
11 



- excluding redemption of tax notes, but including debt repayment as below. 

- from Record of Capital Expenditures. 

- includes Chapter 90 Maintenance as well as Construction up to 1952. 

- a) $12,000 deCordova Gift and $5,000 repayment of Water Department bonds 

to the town. 

b) $5,000 Water Dept. bond repayment to the town. 

c) $50,250 from Post-War Rehabilitation Fund, $3,861.33 premium on bonds 
sold, and $5,000 Water Dept. bond repayment to the town. 

d) Post-War Rehabilitation Fund. 

e) $1000 transfer from Cemetery Fund and $2,676.65 premium on bonds sold. 

f) Charles Sumner Smith Fund. 



Table 4 

Town of Lincoln 

Debt, Assessments, Tax Rate 

(in thousands of dollars) 





a 
Borrowings 


Repayments 


Outstanding 

Debt a 

(Dec. 31) 


Assessment 

Real and Personal 

Property 


Tax Rate 
(per $1000) 


1946 


- 


5.0 


10.0 


3,363.6 




$28 


1947 


- 


5.0 


5.0 


3,737.8 




33 


1948 


330.0 


5.0 


330.0 


3,926.4 




38 


1949 


- 


19.0 


311.0 


4,149.2 




40 


1950 


- 


19.0 


292.0 


4,554.3 




40 


1951 


335.0 


19.0 


608.0 


5,059.5 




44 


1952 


- 


37.0 


571.0 


5,217.2 




45 


1953 


9.0 


37.0 


543.5 


5,498.5 




48 


1954 


- 


40.0 


503.5 


5,862.5 




48 


1955 


a 


40.0 


463. 5 a 


6,253.3 




54 



a 
Excluding borrowing and debt of Regional School District amounting at 

December 31, 1955 to $1,500,000, of which Lincoln's "share" is approximately 

one -third. 



These figures, and the chart, indicate that of the roughly $1,250,000 of 
capital expenditures undertaken in the ten-year period from 1946 to 1955 
inclusive, $200,000 in round numbers came from special capital sources, 
including gifts and the Post-War Rehabilitation Fund; less than $50,000 from 
Chapter 90 construction assistance from the Commonwealth (the figures for 
the early years include Chapter 90 Maintenance as well as Construction); 
$64,000 from State Assistance for School Construction; $460,000 from borrow- 
ing; and the rest, more than $475,000 out of tax funds and free cash. This 
summary excludes Lincoln' s share of the Regional School District which is 
spending $1,500,000 on construction, virtually all out of borrowed funds. 

It should be observed that the Town will be aided in the repayment of its 
school debt by assistance from the Commonwealth, amounting to approximately 
30 per cent. This assistance is applied to the capital amount of borrowing, not 
interest, in equal installments over 20 years. Because of the length of time 
over which it is received, and the necessity meanwhile to pay interest, it is not 
appropriate to deduct it from the Town' s indebtedness. 

Table 5 sets out the annual cost of the capital improvements over the 
last decade in terms of the cost of borrowed funds. In this case the figures for 
debt repayment include the share represented by State Aid. 







Table 5 








Town of Lincoln - Debt Service 






Debt Repayment* 


Interest 


Total 


1946 


$ 5,000 




$ 188 


$ 5,188 


1947 


5,000 




125 


5,125 


1948 


5,000 




63 


5,063 


1949 


19,000 




5,775 


24,775 


1950 


19,000 




5,577 


24,577 


1951 


19,000 




6,088 


25,088 


1952 


37,000 




10,640 


47,640 


1953 


37,000 




10,425 


47,425 


1954 


40,000 




9,956 


49,956 


1955 


40,000 




9,402 


49,402 



* Omitting tax anticipation notes 



Possible Growth of Lincoln Population 



Three methods are available for estimating the likely growth of the 
population of Lincoln over the next twenty years - none of any real accuracy. 
The first calls for simple projections of recent rates of growth; the second 
assumes that the town will "fill up" over the period and calculates a probable 
population at full capacity; a third method attempts to estimate the net effect 
of various known factors. 



are 



These estimates are based on a continuation of present trends and d*. 
based on present zoning. They would require revision if the Bedford Airport 
project of rezoning for non- residential activities led to any major change in 
zoning regulations. 



Simple Projection - The record of the past growth of Lincoln is available 
from decennial national censuses and intervening state estimates. These show: 

Population of Lincoln 



1920 1,042 
1930 1,493 



1945 1,998 
1950 2,427 



1930 



1,783 



1955 



2,949 



Figures up to 1950 are perhaps unrepresentative because of the slowness of 
growth caused by the war. The growth from 1955 to 1975 can be projected 
arithmetically (assuming the same numerical gain each five years) or geo- 
metrically (assuming the same rate of gain). These are tabulated on page 8 
and shown in Chart 2. 





Arithmetic Projection 


Geometric Projection 
(22% every 5 years) 


1960 


3,500 


3,700 


1965 


4,000 


4,500 


1970 


4,500 


5,500 


1975 


5,000 


6,700 



For certain purposes, it is more important to have information on 
school numbers than on the population in general. Data on the elementary 
school population are available from Town Reports and have been projected 
to 1961 by the School Committee, using materials on recorded births, but 
making no allowance for inward migration or future natural increase. These 
show a doubling from 247 in 1945 to 492 in 1953, a further increase to 575 in 
1955, and a projected growth to 700 by 1958 and to 727 by 1961. 

A similar study has been made in connection with the Lincoln -Sudbury 
Regional District School. These figures also represent a conservative approach, 
since they do not allow for inward migration or for a decline in the "drop-out" 
rate to attend private school. Published in the Regional District Committee' s 
brochure, the figures show an increase in the Lincoln high school numbers 
from 96 in 1955 to 200 by 1960 and to 266 by 1964. 

These estimates provide a reasonable basis for planning school con- 
struction toward 1965, but not beyond then. 

The estimate based on the arithmetic projection is likely to constitute 
a minimum figure. The rate of expansion of 22 percent from 1950 to 1955 was 
lower than that of surrounding towns which ranged from 26 to 70 percent. All 
earlier forecasts of school population made in Lincoln on this basis have turned 
out to be underestimates. Similarly the study made in 1952 for water require- 
ments has been proved too conservative. 



CHART 2 



TOWN OF LINCOLN - POPULATION, ACTUAL AND PROJECTED 



8000 



6000 



4000 



2000 




1935 



Most officials of the Town believe that it is safe to use this minimum 
for planning purposes at this time, revising it as necessary in the light of 
experience. It was felt by some, however, that the rate was too slow in the 
nearby years, while one-acre lots laid out prior to the 1955 zoning change were 
developed, but too high in the later years when the effects of the two-acre zoning 
would be felt in lack of available sites. The committee recognizes this possi- 
bility, but finds no way of estimating its quantitative impact. 

Full Capacity - The Committee has restudied the material developed in the 
Land Use Survey prepared by the Planning Board in 1955. Taking those figures, 
and adjusting for two- acre zoning, the Committee has come to the conclusion 
that the town could grow to something like 2,700 households or 10,000 people. 
This estimate makes allowance for land in public ownership, land used for 
roads, and unbuildable swamp and ledge areas. 

Land in the Town now held for public purposes is divided as follows: 

Town, including schools, DeCordova, etc. 100 acres 

Cambridge and Commonwealth 130 acres 
Federal Government, airport, research 

laboratories, Nike installation, 220 acres 

Religious bodies 82 acres 

Audubon society (Hathaway estate) 175 acres 

Total 707 acres 

This constitutes morf than 8 percent of the Town' s 8,572 acres. If 615 acres 
of ponds, 450 acres covered by roads, and 185 acres for the Bedford airport 
housing project are subtracted from the total along with these 707 acres of 
public land, 6,560 acres are left for private building. 

The estimate of 2,700 families on this 6,560 acres has been checked 
against a more detailed study made for Weston. While the planning consultants 
predicted that Weston would be 70 percent "full" by 1970, the calculations on 
land use corresponded closely with the material used in the Lincoln estimate. 
According to the arithmetic projection above, Lincoln would be only 50 to 55 
percent full in 197 5, which indicated that many residents in the town twenty 
years hence will hold land in excess of the two acres required. 

"Probable" Rate of Expansion - Between the possible minimum of 5000 for 
1975 given by the arithmetic projection and 10,000 at full capacity, there is 
no way in which a most probable estimate can be fixed. The Committee feels 
that Lincoln is too small in relation to the metropolitan area to bear any unique 
relationship to its rate of growth. A variety of factors at the national, regional 
and local levels will affect the actual course of events. Some of these may be 
listed: 

National continued prosperity 

continued building in excess of rate of family formation 
availability and cost of mortgage credit 

Regional New England prosperity and growth 

development of Route 2 as limited-access highway 
continued movement of housing and industry from city and 
close suburbs to country, especially on Route 128 

9 



expansion of activity at Bedford airport 

Local cost of house sites in Lincoln, in view of asking prices; 

developmental costs, including roads, water; 
two-acre zoning; etc. 

preference of developers for land capable of development 
into larger number of units. 

growth of cooperative ventures 

increased attraction of Lincoln as schools and improve- 
ments grow 

increase in land held for public purposes 

possible increase in average age of Lincoln families 

Most of these factors are self-explanatory. The Committee has been particu- 
larly interested in the possible increase in average age. At this time, Lincoln 
has a high proportion of young families with young children. It may be that 
the town will remain so: as families grow older, they will move away in con- 
siderable number and their places will be taken by other young families. This 
has occurred in some communities. We feel that in Lincoln, however, a high 
proportion of families intend to settle on a permanent basis. If this is so, the 
average age of Lincoln families will increase, the proportion of young children 
to total population will decline; the high school group will grow faster than the 
elementary school population; and the total population will grow faster than 
school numbers. 

It seems safe to predict that vacant land will sell off and be developed 
in the near future at roughly the same rates as in the recent past. Few develop- 
ers have operated in the town and most of those proceed house by house with a 
limited number of lots. The 23 houses planned by the Browns Woods Coopera- 
tive will be reflected in the statistics, but this venture is not likely to be repeatec 
with frequency. Actual building permits for the past ten years show no sharply 
rising trend: 

Building Permits for New Residences 



1946 


12 


1947 


64=*= 


1948 


57* 


1949 


49 


1950 


34 



1951 


40 


1952 


39 


1953 


44 


1954 


61 


1955 


60 






In view of the unlikelihood that the national rate of building will be sus- 
tained indefinitely, of the slightly higher cost of site acquisition in Lincoln as 
compared with other towns, and of the probable increasing average age of the 
Lincoln population, it seems safe to predict that the 1975 population will be 
closer to the minimum estimate of 5,000 than to the full capacity of 10,000, 
or even to the geometric projection of 6,700. Perhaps an appropriate range of 
estimates would run as follows: 

1955 3,000 

1960 3,500 to 3,600 

1965 4,000 to 4,300 

1970 4,500 to 4,900 

1975 5,000 to 5,500 

10 



With family size now at 3.75 persons per family, and declining slowly to the 
national average of close to 3.5 persons in 1975, this would imply an increase 
in housing as follows: 

1955 800 

1960 945 to 975 

1965 1,090 to 1,180 

1970 1,250 to 1,360 

1975 1,425 to 1,575 

In conclusion the Committee wishes to emphasize that the population 
projection is a guide to the probable time when particular improvements will 
be needed. If the population grows more or less rapidly, it will not invalidate 
the need of certain recommendations in this report so much as change their 
timing. 

Location and Housing 

It follows from the foregoing general picture that unless unforeseen 
changes occur, the additions to housing will take place in all price ranges 
roughly in accordance with existing proportions, and that the average value 
per house, adjusted for any change in the real estate market, will not greatly 
change. 

The Committee sought opinions on the location of probable growth 
because of the possibility that a much more rapid growth in one section of 
town as compared with another would give rise to the requirement of a separate 
new set of facilities to serve that area -- schools, recreation facilities, parking 
area for shopping center, etc., etc. It was advised that in the last 10 years, 
residential house building has been proceeding at a more rapid rate in North 
Lincoln (i.e. Lincoln along Route 2 and to the North) and in South Lincoln (south 
of the Boston and Maine railroad tracks) than in the intervening area. Almost 
equal numbers of houses have been built in the three roughly defined sections: 

Housing Permits Obtained, 1944 - Sept. 30, 1955 

North Lincoln 120 

Central Lincoln 139 

South Lincoln 124 

Total 383 

but the Central area is considerably larger than the others. 

On consultation with planning experts, however, the Committee is informed 
that there is no inherent tendency in towns to divide as their population grows in 
the range of population likely to be reached by Lincoln by 1975. The development 
of separate "neighborhoods" can be fostered by creating separate facilities, but 
is not, in this opinion, inevitable in the absence of such steps. The views of all 
those consulted, moreover, which the Committee shares, is that every possible 
step should be taken to avoid any one or more neighborhoods in Lincoln breaking 
off from the others. 

Commercial Zoning - The Committee believes that the Town is not prepared to 

11 



1951 


$1,000 


1952 





1953 


l,398.71 c 


1954 


227. 50 a 


1955 


762.74 



rezone any considerable area for unspecified commercial or industrial use. 
Some members of the Committee, however, while opposed in principle to spot 
zoning, are of the opinion that the town could benefit financially without serious 
harm by admitting particular commercial or industrial establishments of a 
clean, high value sort which create no nuisance. This might be done either in 
response to specific requests by such a business, or on application after rezon- 
ing, particularly if the relocation of Route 2 or the Bedford airport housing 
project should establish an area somewhat cutoff from neighboring residential 
areas. 

Detailed Recommendations - In the light of the foregoing considerations, the 
Committee recommends the general scope and character of capital expenditures 
set forth in Table 1 above, and presents in support the following detailed set of 
justifications: 

General Government 

a. Record of capital outlays, 1946-1955 

1946 $l,826.30 a 

1947 

1948 3,880.00 

1949 

1950 

Total $9,095.25 

a b 

Planning Board surveys; Major renovation heating system Town House 

Remodelling Town offices. 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditures (recommended, possibly avoidable) 

$10,000 for remodelling Town Offices further, some 
time in future, arbitrarily allocated to 1957. 

The cost of Planning Board Surveys may be regarded either as a capital 
or a current outlay. In the record, we have taken the first course, but have made 
no attempt to foresee expenditures of this sort. 

The growth of the town will require further changes in the Town Offices. 
The Committee feels that the present building is adequate in size, but recommenc 
that a survey be made of usable office space on the first floor, combined with the 
feasibility of re-locating the present kitchen equipment accessible to the upper 
Town Hall. 

It is probable that, with the construction of a Fire Station, the contem- 
plated Legion Building, and eventual availability of Pierce House, certain social 
functions, now dependent upon the Town House space, could be transferred. 

c. Financing - current budget 

Protection of Persons and Property 

1. Police 

12 



Record of Capital Outlays, 1947-1955 



1946 




1951 


$ 326.61 


1947 


$604.00 


1952 


1,778.77 


1948 


382.00 


1953 


593.30 


1949 


? 


1954 


699.00 


1950 


294.82 


1955 


1,584.00 



Total $6,262.50 all for cars and radios 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditures (Unavoidable) $1500 annually, 
for cars, radio equipment, etc. 

Provision for police offices and a lockup is made under the heading of 
fire protection, since it is intended to include these in the new fire house. 

The other major requirement is for automobiles, equipped with radios. 
This requirement may possibly be regarded as a current expense, but it is 
treated here as capital. 

Some expansion in equipment will be needed, however, during the course 
of the 20 years ahead. The National Safety Council estimates that one police 
officer is required for every 1,000 persons. With 3,000 population, and 4 
regular officers, Lincoln appears to be somewhat better protected than the 
average, but it is likely that the Safety Council estimate is difficult to apply 
to small towns. 

c. Financing - current budget 
2. Fire Protection 

a. Record of Capital Outlays, 1946-1955 

1946 — 1951 

1947 $12,500.00 a 1952 

1948 — 1953 

1949 --- 1954 $l,210.00 b 

1950 --- 1955 2,200.00° 
Total $15,910.00 

a . b c 

New equipment; Fire alarms; Purchase of land 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditures 

1956-1960 $108,000 (total to be spent in 1957)unavoidable 

1961-1965 15,000 unavoidable 

1966-1970 50,000 possibly postponable 
1971-1975 

One of the most immediate needs of the Town is a new Central Fire 
Station adequate to house two pieces of major equipment. The earliest this can 
probably be built is 1957, and the Committee recommends that this be done at 
an estimated cost of $100,000. This Committee therefore supports the article 
in the warrant to appoint a building committee for the purpose of reviewing the 

13 



site purchased in the light of the Commonwealth' s plans for relocating Route 2, 
and to recommend to the town both site and building plans. It is suggested that 
this Committee, in cooperation with the Board of Selectmen, work with the 
National Board of Fire Underwriters in securing approval of a site which would, 
in their opinion, give needed coverage. 

This Fire Station, as already noted, should house the Town' s communi- 
cation center, police offices and an overnight lockup. In addition, it should 
provide dormitory quarters for a small number of men, including a full-time 
driver. Most important, in a town which proposes to rely largely on call firemen 
this building should have a social room with kitchen equipment for the benefit of 
the members of the Department and others. 

The amount of $8,000 in 1957 is included for replacement of equipment 
purchased in 1936. $15,000 is set down for 1961-1965 as an estimate to cover 
the replacement of the two pieces bought in 1947. 

$50,000 may be needed in the 3rd or 4th five-year period to house the 
fire apparatus located south of the Boston and Maine railroad line in South 
Lincoln. This equipment is now housed in a garage, but this arrangement may 
not be capable of indefinite extension. Room is not available in the Town Garage, 
although its site may be large enough to obviate the necessity to buy more land. 

c. Financing 

The purchase of apparatus would be made out of current taxes, but the 
fire houses would be financed through borrowing. A 20 -year basis has been 
assumed. 

d. Effect on current expenditure 

The cost of fire protection in Lincoln has been running about $7,000 to 
$8,000 of current expenditure. The necessity to employ full-time coverage plus 
upkeep on a building would increase this possibly by as much as $5,000. Heating 
and maintenance are estimated at $3,000 annually. At the same time, the trans- 
fer of the Town' s communication center to the Fire station would increase the 
fire protection of the town without additional cost. 

It is believed by the Committee that this increase in current expense is 
unavoidable. It should be observed in this connection that a full-time department 
costs on the order of $25,000 for salaries alone. 

3. Other Protection of Persons and Property 

a. Record of capital outlays, 1946-1955 

1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 

Total $9,912,44 



14 



1951 


$3,000.00 a 


1952 


2,922.70 b 


1953 


1954 





1955 


3,989.44° 



a b 

Estimated initial expenditure on civil defense; Tree and Moth 

department truck and sprayer; C Town Hall switch board and Civil 

Defense communication equipment. 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditures 

Possible $4,000 for civil defense alarm, allocated arbitrarily 
to 1957 in event fire whistles prove inadequate. 

Desirable expenditure of $10,000 for a rescue truck not 
recommended at this time in view of cost and limited use. 

In absence of a clear appreciation of the civil defense danger, it is hard 
to pursue a rational policy of expenditure in this area. The town has acquired 
an adequate communication center, although further expenditure on a system of 
4 linked sirens may be required in the event that the new fire whistle recently 
installed cannot be heard adequately in all parts of the town under various 
conditions. 

The town has recently been designated an evacuation town, instead of a 
reception area, which changes the character of its civil defense task. In the 
absence of clear indications of what is needed, the Director is proceeding on 
the basis of providing for emergency needs in flood, hurricane or other natural 
disasters. 

It would be desirable to have a rescue truck, but in view of its high cost 
and the uncertainty of its justification, this is not recommended at this time. 

It is recommended that this area of capital expense be kept under cons- 
tant review in the light of the developing situation. 

c. Financing - current budget 
Health and Sanitation 

a. Record of capital outlays, 1946-1955 

Nurse' s automobile, approximately $750 in 1948 and $877 in 
1955. 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditures 

None (treating the nurses' car as a current expense). 

The question of land to protect the drainage basin of Sandy 
Pond, strongly urged by the Board of Health, is referred 
to below under Land Acquisition. 

Apart from the nurse' s car and the land around Sandy Pond, 
the Committee recommends no capital expenditures for 
garbage or rubbish disposal, or sewers. 

i. Garbage disposal - The Committee sees no necessity to 

15 



alter the present method of garbage disposal to piggeries, 
at least until the present situation changes. It is true that 
the numbers of piggeries in Lincoln has declined from 
about 15 before World War II to 2 currently, and these 
numbers may be still further reduced in 20 years. There 
are however, still considerable numbers of piggeries in 
towns to the north, and many towns contract to dispose of 
their garbage with piggeries in relatively distant towns. 

It is considered that the construction of an incinerator, 
such as Concord is building at a cost of $45,000, is not 
justified in a town the size of Lincoln as it is now or as 
it may develop over the period immediately ahead. A 
number of the Town' s residents have installed domestic 
incinerators and found this a satisfactory answer to the 
garbage and paper disposal problem. The Planning Board 
is considering recommending that new houses include this 
relatively inexpensive feature. No need for the town to 
undertake such an item is foreseen. 

ii. Sewers: The Committee sees no need for the Town to 
construct sewers in the next 20 years, if the 2 acre zoning 
is preserved. It is recognized that there is something of 
a drainage problem in certain older areas in the town 
where lots are below 1 acre and old cesspools have been 
in use a long time. Similar problems possibly could devel- 
op in new construction in swampy areas. The Committee 
believes that these problems are all solvable on an indi- 
vidual basis. 

Any industrial development would have to provide for its 
own waste disposal. In the event of a large development in 
the area adjacent to Bedford Airport, it might be feasible 
to connect an industrial sewer system to the Metropolitan 
District Commission system which now reaches the airport 
Such connections might be financed by a loan to be paid by 
assessments to the beneficiaries. 



Recreation 



a. Record of Capital Expenditures, 1945-1955 

1950 $963.26 both items for resurfacing tennis 

1951 226.01 courts. 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditures 

1958 $1-4,000 additional tennis courts (avoidable but 

desirable) 
1961-65 13,000 baseball diamond and new grandstands 

(avoidable but desirable) 
1965-75 100,000 town swimming pool, etc. (questionable) 



16 



The recommendations of the Committee in this area are based upon 
informal and hurried reports of members of the Recreation Committee, which 
was belatedly requested to assist the Committee. Accordingly, these recom- 
mendations are tentative and the subject should be given further study. 

The growth of the Town suggests the necessity for additional town tennis 
courts. $14,000 will buy two on the recommended site. These should be lined 
up with the present courts, which will encroach to a small extent on private 
land, and also require the diversion of a small stream. 1958 is suggested as 
the most suitable time. 

The present grandstand is gradually deteriorating. A new grandstand of 
steel will cost $5000. Despite the current demise of the Mohawks, a stand is 
needed for town events. 

A second diamond will be needed ultimately and will cost $8,000 mainly 
for backstop. Its outfield will interlock with the present outfield. The new 
stands and the new diamond have been foreseen for 1961-65. 

The Recreation Committee proposes that the Town should embark on 

a) the creation of a hockey rink and skating area 

b) a town swimming pool 

The Committee is not prepared to recommend expenditures for these structures 
at the present time. The hockey rink, etc., would require a couple of acres of 
swampy land, so regulated as to drainage as to make possible flooding with 
regulator gates built into drainage streams, a parking area for 40 to 50 cars, 
lights and toilet facilities. Perhaps $3,000 without land cost would suffice with 
crude facilities. An Olympic size pool, 75' x 225' could be built for $40,000 to 
$50,000, but an additional sum of similar size would be needed to fence it, 
construct dressing and toilet facilities, parking, etc. A considerable annual 
sum would be needed for maintenance and operation. 

The Recreation Committee has made the suggestion that the Town under- 
take to improve the drainage of the streams from Sandy Pond to Pierce Hill Road 
with the idea of ultimately using the area near the Smith School as the site of a 
combined swimming pool and skating area. Assistance could be obtained from 
the Middlesex Soil Conservation District, and possibly from other agencies such 
as Mosquito Control. The cost would run $6-8,000 immediately. The Committee 
finds this idea attractive but is not sufficiently informed to make recommenda- 
tions. It would be useful to get the Middlesex Soil Conservation District to 
survey the possibilities, which must be done in winter months. 

The Committee has not be able to investigate adequately the proposal for 
a boat landing on the Sudbury River; or for the ultimate conversion of Pierce 
House into a recreation Center. It suggests that more extensive attention is 
needed in this area, whether by the Planning Board, the Recreation Committee, 
by a continued Capital Requirements Committee, or by ad hoc bodies. 

It may not be out of place to note that the development of the recreation 
facilities of Lincoln provides an opportunity for someone interested in making a 
benefaction to the Town by gift or bequest. 

17 



Land Acquisition 

a. Record of Capital Outlays - not given separately. 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditure - not available. 

It is understood that the Land Acquisition Committee has not yet reached 
the stage where it is ready to estimate the costs of proposals for the purchase 
of land which it expects to put forward. Proposals are in preparation for the 
purchase or acquisition of land near Sandy Pond, and a recreational site of some 
30 acres in North Lincoln. Without prejudice to a subsequent realistic estimate, 
but in order to make some rough allowance for expenditure under this category, 
the sum of $30,000 has been included in this report and charged against 1959. A 
definitive estimate, of course, awaits the results of continued study by the Land 
Acquisition Committee. 

c. Financing - Any substantial expenditure for land would pre- 

sumably be financed by borrowing over a long term. 

Highways 

1. Road Improvements 

a. Record of Capital Outlays, 1946-1955 

It is impossible to construct an adequate record of capital 
expenditures on road construction and reconstruction. The 
data in Table 2 are for Chapter 90 construction, which may 
. include most but does not cover all such construction. These 
figures are as follows: 

Expenditures under Chapter 90 Construction 



1946 


$ 5,316.29 


1951 


$10,000.00 


1947 


9,486.08 


1952 


6,655.81 


1948 


7,996.08 


1953 


--- 


1949 


8,000.00 


1954 





1950 


10,000.00 


1955 


--- 



Total #57,454.26 

In 1955, mix-in-place macadam topping was applied to Bedford Road and 
Old Concord Road at a cost of $3,000. Similar sums in other years are included 
along with maintenance, snow removal, etc. It may be observed that the total 
expenditure for the highway department, including maintenance, machinery, 
repairs, supplies and street lights, has risen only slowly as follows: 



1946 


$33,704.42 


1951 


$46,809.69 


1947 


38.375.52 


1952 


48,527.26 


1948 


42,177.48 


1953 


42,558.26 


1949 


43,868.90 


1954 


37,100.70 


1950 


44,923.77 


1955 


42,516.19 



18 



The decline in these amounts in 1953 and 1954 was due to the halt in 
Chapter 90 construction. Apart from this, however, the increase from 1947 to 
1952 was probably less than the rise in the price level for supplies and labor. 

b. Proposed Level of Capital Expenditures 

1956 $32,000 Chapter 90 on Trapelo Road from Center 

to deNormandie Pond, of which $12,000 
voted in 1955. 

1957-60 165,000 Chapter 90 construction of Old County 
Road, assuming cloverleaf on limited- 
access Route 2 at junction of Old County 
Road and present Route 2 

1961-65 75,000 reconstruction of Route 126 from Codman 
Road to Wayland line under Chapter 90. 

1966-75 not planned. 

Detailed discussion of highway recommendations under Road Improve- 
ments, New Roads and Road Machinery is provided in a special report made to 
the Committee by one of its members, M.E. Shank, and accepted with the general 
approval of the Committee. This is presented in an appendix to the present 
report, and discusses capital and maintenance expenditures, which in this field, 
are intimately related. The report suggests the division of the Town' s roads 
into A, B, and C categories, of which only A would be constructed to Chapter 90 
standards, with no capital expenditures, but fairly substantial maintenance 
outlays on the B and C roads. 

c. Financing 

The amounts shown above represent the total cost of the various projects, 
of which only one -quarter would be borne by the Town. The Old County Road 
project, which would involve the extension of the present road from Winter Street 
through to Conant Road and then to Route 117, includes only costs for construction 
and reconstruction in Lincoln, and assumes that their shares of the cost would be 
borne by Waltham and Weston. 

d. Effects on Current Expenditures 

Chapter 90 construction will limit amounts needed for maintenance on 
these roads. On B and C roads, however, substantial maintenance costs will be 
needed in lieu of very heavy capital outlays. The Shank report suggest that annual 
maintenance expenditures for roads should be increased as rapidly as practicable 
by $18,500. 

2. New Roads 
see under Old County Road above 

3. Land Takings 

a. Record of capital outlays, 1946-1955 - not shown separately 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditure 

19 



The Committee strongly recommends that the Town proceed with the 
land takings along the major roads of the town to a minimum of 40 feet width, 
regardless of decisions to improve roads in the immediate future. Such action 
has been recommended by the Planning Board, the Selectmen, and is understood 
by the Town at large. There is no reason to delay. 

It is not believed that damages for land takings will prove sizeable and 
many property owners may be expected to deed the required land to the Town 
free of charge or for a nominal consideration. No estimates can be made of 
damages if a significant number of property owners take a different view. 

4. Sidewalks, Parking areas 

a. Record of capital outlays, 1946-1955 - none aside from school 

b. Proposed capital expenditures 

$10,000, of which $5,000 for a sidewalk to connect the Smith 
and Center Schools, and $5,000 for land and blacktopping on 
parking area. This expenditure, which is avoidable, is arbi- 
trarily allocated to 1959. 

i. Sidewalks: The Committee believes that the Town in 
general will not be lined with sidewalks in the foreseeable 
future. The few existing sidewalks on Bedford Road from 
O' Sullivan house to the Center, or along Lincoln Road 
from the Center to the Center School, are little used. 
Children and adults walking along the roads must be aware 
of the hazards of automobiles. The growth of the Town to 
a population of 5,500 will not bring with it a 1st class post 
office and postman delivery such as requires sidewalks. 

There is, however, a need for a sidewalk for children 
walking between the Smith and Center schools. It is 
virtually impossible to prohibit such walking, and such a 
prohibition would require extra bus service to bring all 
children to school by bus, including those now regarded as 
within walking distance. 

A problem is presented by the route, which could either 
follow the road or go through the woods. The latter is short 
er but would require the purchase of land and a survey to 
determine the attitude of the owners. A difference of view 
over the route, however, should not lead to the indefinite 
postponement of the project. The amount mentioned, $5,000, 
is a very rough estimate lacking a specific proposal. 

ii. Parking areas: The Committee is not disposed to 
recommend the construction of a municipal parking lot for 
shoppers, such as are being developed in other towns. 
While considerable expansion of commercial facilities will 
occur as the population approaches 5,500, the Zoning By-law 
if amended as proposed by the Planning Board, will ensure 

20 



that reasonable parking space is provided with all new 
commercial construction. 

Despite this general position, the Committee believes that 
it would be prudent for the Town to acquire additional land 
in South Lincoln for development for parking, across 
Lincoln Road from and on the same side of the railroad 
as the station. Land and ultimate biacktopping have been 
estimated at $5,000. This presupposes the acquisition of 
land at a price generous to the Town. 



6. Road Machinery 

a. Record of Capital Outlays 



1946 


$11,786.75 


1951 




1947 


944.00 


1952 


$1,624.90 


1948 


7,231.25 


1953 


1,543.50 


1949 


7,750.00 


1954 


550.00 


1950 





1955 






Total $31,430.40 



b. Proposed Capital Expenditures 



1956 


$ 9,800 


1961-65 


$50,000 - 


$75,000 


1957 


12,500 


1966-70 


50,000 - 


75,000 


1958 


14,500 


1971-75 


50,000 - 


75,000 


1959 


10,000 








1960 


7,500 









For discussion, see Shank memorandum in appendix. 
c. Financing - current expense 



Schools 



1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 



d. Effect on Current expense 



a. Record of Capital Outlays 



These capital expenditures will re- 
duce annual expenditure for main- 
tenance and for hiring road roller, etc. 



New equipment New School New School Second Regional Other 
Construction addition addition High School 



not est. sep. 

not est. sep. 

not est. sep. 

not est. sep. 

not est. sep. 

not est. sep. 

not est. sep. 

not est. sep. 
1,975.11 
1,285.12 



16,099.62 

3,658.11 

284,248.67 

45,276.26 

46.45 
318.88 



21,370.32 

368,629.68 

74,620.98 



13,112.58 15,174.20 
106,046.89 n.r. 



2,749.74' 



4,000.00* 



$3,260.23 



349,647.99 464,620.98 119,169.47 15,174.20 6,749.74 



21 



Schools a. Record of Capital Outlays (Continued) 

Costs of planning Regional High School 

2 
Center School toilets replacement 

3 
Center School boiler replacement 

n. r. - no record 



1. Elementary School 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditure s 



1956 --- 1961-1965 $168,000 

1957 --- (1961 unavoidable) 

1958 $232,000 (unavoidable) 1966-1970 300,000 

1959 --- 1971-1975 200,000 
1960 



Total $232,000 
Estimates for 1966-75 very rough and uncertain. 

The present elementary facilities consist of 23 classrooms plus 5 other 
instructional stations (gymnasium, music room, etc.). At 25 pupils per class- 
room and counting two of the extra stations, this gives a rapacity for 625 com- 
pared with the present enrollment (see page 21 above) of 575. Present capacity 
will permit three classes per grade from 1st through 8th grade, which will be 
reached next year. 

The School Committee contemplates building in two stages of 7 and 5 
rooms. The broad decision has been reached to adhere to the present two sites 
--of the Smith and Center Schools -- with the idea of keeping the elementary 
school population in one body. The detailed decision as to whether any additions 
will be undertaken in the Center School has yet to be made. 

The estimates include 8 to 10 per cent of building costs for equipment. 

The School Board foresees the need of an additional room for a School 
Library, largely of reference works, accessible to the pupils without the 
necessity to go to the Town Library and back again. 

No provision is made in the foregoing requests for such a room. 

The School Committee foresees no expenditures for a school cafeteria, 
for housing for teachers, for busses (which are hired). The subject of a side- 
walk is discussed elsewhere. The extension of existing playgrounds is under 
study. The School Committee is not now interested in acquiring sites of future 
schools in other parts of the Town. 

22 



Estimates for 1966-75 are based on increases in pupils of about 100 each 
five-year period, with allowance for new overhead facilities in the first of these 
periods. 

c. Financing 

By borrowing. The Town borrows and pays interest on the entire debt, 
but is assisted by the Commonwealth on a complex formula which has resulted 
in payments of about one -third of debt repayment. On $240,000 borrowing, at 
2\ per cent interest for 20 years the Town' s average payment, after state aid, 
would amount to $11,000. Adding the two additions, under the same assumptions , 
the Town' s average carrying cost when both were being financed concurrently 
would be $22,000. 

The foregoing figures assume no Federal aid. 

d. Effect on Current expenditures 

12 additional classrooms over the next 10 years would require 15 addi- 
tional teachers (including those in "overhead" subjects such as music, art, 
physical education, etc.). At an average salary of $4,500 a year, one reaches 
a figure of $67,500. The total cost of school operation including building main- 
tenance, tends to run 1.5 times instructional cost, which would bring the total 
in 10 years to $100,000. 

2. Regional High School 

a. Record of Capital Outlays 

Total Lincoln "Share" 

1955-1956 $1,500,000 $500,000 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditures 

Total Lincoln "Share" 
1956-1960 

1961-1965 $620,000 $250,000 

1966-1970 300,000 100,000 

1971-1975 419,000 125,000 

The new regional high school now under construction at a cost of 
$1,500,000 has been planned for 650 pupils with additions embodied in the 
original design in three stages to raise the capacity to 1,000, 1,200, and 1,500 
respectively. It is contemplated that the first of these stages will be required 
for 1962 or 1963. 

The estimate that one addition will be needed in each of the five-year 
periods after the first and the sharing of costs is based on very rough estimates 
of high school pupils as follows: 



23 







Lincoln 
100 


Sudbury 


Total 


1955 


150 


250 


1960 




200 


300 


500 


1965 




267 


433 


700 


1970 




333 


666 


1,000 


1975 




400 


850 


1,250 


c. Financing 









Through borrowing by the Regional School District. Under regional 
school arrangements, both towns stand behind the total debt of the Regional 
School District, but it is not included in the debt record, nor does it affect the 
debt limits of either town. It is therefore, inappropriate to divide the debt into 
the "shares" of the respective towns. Moreover, the district calls on the towns 
for support for debt service and current expenses annually in proportion to the 
numbers of pupils from each town. At present, Lincoln pays approximately 40 
percent of debt service. If Sudbury grows somewhat faster than Lincoln, as the 
table above suggests, the proportion will decline to more nearly 30 percent. 

State assistance for construction is at the same rate as for elementary 
schools (currently nearly 30 percent in Lincoln) plus 15 percentage points for 
participation in a regional school. 

At the peak of total building, assuming that the last addition is undertaken 
before the first has been paid for, and assuming 2\ percent interest and 20 year 
bonds, with Lincoln paying one-third of the joint charges, total borrowing would 
amount to $2,750,000, interest charges to $70,000, and debt repayment to $137, 00( 
Lincoln 1 s share of interest at $23,333 and of debt repayment, after State assis- 
tance, of $22,000 would amount to $45,333. 

d. Effect on Current Expenditures 

The growth of the high school will entail a distinct enlargement of current 
expense, running possibly as high in the early stages as $500 per pupil. Assum- 
ing $2,000 of capital construction per pupil on the average, and the above assump- 
tions on borrowing and State assistance, roughly $100 of this would be the cost of 
carrying and paying off construction costs over 20 years. The remainder would 
be entirely current expense. With the expansion of pupil numbers over time, 
and the spreading of overhead, the per pupil average cost is expected to decline. 

Library 

a. Record of Capital Outlays, 1946-55 - none 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditures 

1957 $65,000 new wing on present structure (unavoidable 

1961-1965 4,000 electrification of clock (not absolutely 

necessary) 
1966-1970 
1971-1975 



24 



The growth of the library has not kept pace with the expansion of the 
Town. Because of limitations of space, it is now necessary to discard one 
book for every new book acquired. The numbers of books per capita has fallen 
from 10 to 1925, which is the level achieved currently in Concord, to 5. Weston 
is 7|, which is the appropriate level for a town of this size. The library lacks 
an adequate reading room for children, and proper facilities for librarians. 

The Trustees of the Library have examined several plans, of which the 
two main alternatives have been a remodelling of the basement, at a cost of 
$23,500, and the addition of a new wing at $65,000. The former would provide 
a children 1 s room, but little in the way of stack space. It would therefore re- 
quire a subsequent project in perhaps five years. The wing, extending north- 
ward from the present structure, would be 30' x 50' , house 30,000 books 
additional to the present 15,000, a children' s room, public toilets, and a 
librarians' room. This should take care of the Town' s requirements for 20 
years. It is accordingly recommended. It is desirable that a building committee 
be appointed in 1956 to bring in plans and that construction proceed in 1957. 

The Tower Clock, which is mechanical, is maintained in good working 
order through the generous efforts of a citizen. It will ultimately be desirable 
to replace the mechanical with electrical works. 

c. Financing - Addition, by borrowing. Clock as current expense. 

At 2| percent interest rate for 20 years this would cost $3,250 annually 
in debt retirement, and an initial $1,625 and an average $812.50 in interest charges. 

If a public -spirited citizen were interested in making a contribution to 
the Town, whether as gift or bequest, the needs of the Library would seem to 
merit particular attention. 

d. Effect on Current Expense 

The current budget of the Library will inevitably expand as additional 
staff is needed. The present budget runs about $6,600 annually, of which $4300 
is for salaries, $1375 for books, $700 for supplies and $225 for repairs. $200 
of this amount comes from endowment, $1,000 from the dog tax, and the remain- 
der from general taxes. Even without the addition, salary expense must increase 
as service is needed on more days per week than the current three. With the 
addition, the cost of maintenance and supplies will be approximately doubled. 

Water Department 

a. Record of Capital Outlays 

WATER COMMISSION 

Additions 
and Replacements Meters Other 

1946 $ 4,000 1 --- --- 

1947 23,300 1 

1948 15,800! 

1949 le^oo 1 



25 



WATER COMMISSION (Continued) 







Additions 




and 


Replacements 


1950 




9,600* 


1951 




16,30c 1 


1952 







1953 







1954 







1955 








Meters Other 

$ 3,9002 

10,600 2 

$7,814.71 

7,481.67 500 3 

5,890.43 2,342 4 



$85,600 $21,186.81 $17,342 

^Estimated. Taken from Blake Survey, Town Report, 1952, p. 118. 
Legal and engineering services, connection additional water source 



(and probably Concord takeoff Sandy Pond) 

„Chlorinator 
4 
Heating system, $1,000; new truck, $1342. 



b. Proposed Capital Expenditures 



1956-1960 $107,000 unavoidable, plus $60,000 estimated 

1961-1965 60,000 unavoidable 

1966-1970 55,000 unavoidable 

1971-1975 500,000 uncertain 

Capital expenditures by the Board of Water Commissioners in the past 
10 years have included six years of replacement of 4" or 6" main with 8" or 
larger, and three years of expenditure for metering, arising from the fears felt 
in 1951 and 1952 that the Town's water supply was inadequate. The completion 
of metering makes it possible to renew modernization of existing mains. In 
addition, several major expenses and a variety of lesser ones appear in the 
future in connection with water supply and primary distribution. 

The major restriction on water supply for the next several years appears 
to be not the capacity of Sandy Pond but that of the distribution system. In par- 
ticular, the system is strained in periods of drought with maximum water use by 
the gradual constriction of the main from Sandy Pond to the reservoir on the 
Town Hill. Replacement with a 16" main is probably cheaper than cleaning, and 
is required in the first five-year period at a cost of $80,000. 

The Town Report for 1952 contains a map at p. 112 showing the size of 
existing mains. A program of continued replacement annually should be resumed 
as early as possible. The Board of Water Commissioners has been handicapped 
in the last year or so by uncertainty on road reconstruction. It is economical 
to associate work on water mains with road reconstruction. New mains on 
Trapelo Road from the Center to the cemetery, on Route 2 and on Old Sudbury 
Road have been assigned to the first five year period on the basis of need and 
contemplated road work. 

In addition to the foregoing, the first five years will require a consider- 
able number of items of construction or major repairs connected with Sandy 
Pond, including a new suction intake, one new pump, and rebuilding of the dam 
at the outlet. 

26 



The program for the first five years, 1956-1960, includes $80,000 for 
the new 16" main from Sandy Pond to the Town Hill reservoir; $6,000 for a 
new pump; $5,000 for a new suction intake; $15,000 for rebuilding the dam on 
Sandy Pond when lower water permits; $1,000 for building repair. In addition 
there is $119,000 of replacement of existing mains which must be regarded as 
uncertain, partly because of dependence on road relocations and building. The 
assumption made in Table 1 is that half of this work will be undertaken, but 
this assumption needs to be kept under examination. The replacement of the 
16" main and the work around Sandy Pond are covered in the estimate. 

A new source of water supply will not be needed for some 10 to 15 years, 
in the view of the Committee, but will then cost a very considerable sum such 
as $500,000. The Board of Water Commissioners and the Committee believe 
that the most feasible plan will be to use wells within Lincoln, rather than con- 
nect to Hobbs Brook Reservoir, or MDC, but the issue need not be settled at 
this time. 

No capital expense for construction of new mains on roads not now served 
is contemplated on the foregoing estimates for Mill Street, Sandy Pond Road, 
Concord Road or Conant Road, since the town appears to be satisfied with pre- 
sent regulations under which developers assumed cost of extending mains. It 
would be possible to extend mains, however, with the use of assessments but in 
areas zoned for 2 acres, it is believed cheaper to drill wells. 

c. Financing 

The Committee recognizes that the Board of Water Commissioners and 
the Town have gone through an adjustment period as water charges were changed 
from the outlet basis to meters. It regards it as desirable, however, to return 
as quickly as possible to regular annual outlays for replacements of mains at an 
average level between $12,000 and $14,000, paid for out of revenue. This would 
permit $60,000 - $70,000 of improvements in each five-year period without the 
need for borrowing. 

The 16" main from Sandy Pond to the reservoir on the Town Hill and the 
improvements in the suction intake, outlet dam, etc., would be financed by bor- 
rowing. If these were delayed until 1958 or 1959, after the next addition to the 
School had been financed, the possible effect on the credit of the town would be 
minimized. 

d. Effect on Current Expenditure 

The new main to the reservoir is likely to decrease expenditure somewhat. 
Electric Power 

a. Record of Capital Expenditures - none 

b. Proposed Capital Expenditures - none 

A number of citizens have suggested that our committee should examine 
the possibility of savings for the citizens of the Town through municipal acqui- 
sition of facilities for distribution of electric power, and operation by the Town, 

27 



such as has been successful in Belmont, Concord, Littleton, Groton, Hudson, 
etc. In view of the complex and technical character of this question, the 
Committee asked George H. Kidder to investigate the question in its behalf. 
After a thorough study by Mr. Kidder, the Committee is disposed to accept 
his conclusion that such action is not practical today. Equipment costs would 
be high and uncertain; the necessity to amortize such cost over 20 years would 
add a high charge to be met before profits could be made or light charges re- 
duced. These difficulties probably explain why no town has entered the business 
of electricity distribution since 1908. 

The Committee wishes particularly to express its gratitude to Mr. 
Kidder for his work. 

Finances 

Along with most other towns, the Lincoln tax rate has been increasing 
rapidly in recent years, as the cost of capital expenditures and increased 
current expense have risen faster than property valuations. A somewhat crude 
attempt to compare financial statistics for neighboring and similar towns is 
given in the appendix. It is important there to note, however, that the crude 
rate is relatively meaningless in the absence of some notion of the relation of 
property assessments to the market value of property. Over the state as a 
whole, assessments typically run 50 to 60 percent of market values. In Lincoln, 
the percentage is 25 to 33. Thus the tax rate of $54 is a rate of $13.50 to $18.00 
based on market rates, whereas the Weston rate of $40, with assessments run- 
ning close to 50 percent of market values, is a rate of $20 based on market rates. 

If the recommended level of capital expenditures is undertaken for the 
next five years, it is estimated that the tax rate will rise from its present level 
of $54 to $64. The details of this calculation are shown in Table 6 on the next 
page. It should be noted that this projection is made on the basis of the data 
taken from the annual report of the Treasurer, as set out in Table 3 above, rather 
than on the method used by the Board of Assessors. It is, of course, subject to 
a considerable degree of uncertainty. No estimate is given for 1956 to emphasize 
the approximate character of the calculation. 

It should be observed that the Town debt at the end of 1960 would, on these 
projections amount to approximately $700,000 plus its "share" in the Regional 
School debt amounting then to $1,250,000, and Water Board obligations estimated 
at $60,000. The legal debt limit, which is five per cent of assessed valuation is 
estimated at $400,000. Towns can readily obtain exemptions to exceed the debt 
limit for school construction and particularly for participating in regional school 
districts, since this debt is in substantial part repayable by the state. The gross 
amount of borrowing for non- school purposes during the next five year periods is 
estimated at $255,000. It is considered that this program, while it would approach 
the limits of the financial capacity of the town, would not jeopardize its credit 
standing. 

No attempt has been made to estimate the tax rate beyond 5 years because 
of the heightened uncertainty of the various projections involved. 



28 



Table 6 

TENTATIVE FORECAST OF LINCOLN TAX RATE, 1957-1960 
(in thousands of dollars) 



Expenditures 


1955 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


Current Expense 


461.7 


510.0 


540.0 


570.0 


600.0 


(ex debt service) 












Service existing debt a 


49.4 C 


75.8 


74.6 


72.8 


72.0 


Total 


511.1 


585.8 


614.6 


642.8 


672.0 


Capital expense (incl. 


110.5 d 


249.0 


318.0 


195.5 


76.0 


water, omitting cemetery) 












Service add 1 1 debt 


--- 


2.1 


14.6 


30.4 


36.3 


TOTAL 


621.6 


836.9 


947.2 


868.7 


784.3 


Receipts 












Commonwealth, etc. 


96.9 


105.0 


110.0 


115.0 


120.0 


Other 


33.0 


40.0 


42.0 


44.0 


46.0 


Special Capital 


104.4 


--- 


--- 


--- 


--- 


School constr. assistance 


34.1 


17.6 


17.6 


21.0 


13.8 


Chapter 90 


--- 


30.0 


30.0 


30.0 


30.0 


Water receipts 


39.4 


42.0 


44.0 


46.0 


48.0 


Borrowing 


___d 


165.0 


230.0 


110.0 


--- 


Total of above 


307.8 


399.6 


473.6 


366.0 


257.8 


Amount to be Raised by 


391. 5 e 


437.3 


473.6 


502.7 


526.5 


Taxation 












Valuation 


6,253.3 


7,000.0 


7,400.0 


7,800.0 


8,200.0 



Given something of these orders of magnitude of current expenditure and 
of the Town' s share of Commonwealth receipts, both of which are subject to 
considerable uncertainty, and given something like the projected growth in real 
and personal property assessments, the capital requirements program outlined 
above can be taken to imply a set of tax rates as follows. The validity of this 
forecast, however, depends more on the assumptions than on the capital expendi- 
ture. Accordingly, these tax rates should be viewed with reserve. 



Tax Rate (in dollars 
per $1000) 



54.00 



62.00 



64.00 



64.00 



64.00 



a Net of state aid for Regional School construction 

Excluding state aid for Regional School 
c Plus small amount of debt service for Regional School included in current 

expense 

Excluding capital transactions of Regional School District 
e Amount actually raised. See Table 3. 



29 



Recommendations 

1. With the submission of this report, the Long-Term Capital Requirements 
Committee has completed its task, and begs to be discharged. 

2. The Committee believes that more attention should be given to long-term 
planning in the Town, both physical and financial. On the first score, it ventures 
to express the opinion that the Planning Board is too busy with processing appli- 
cations for developments to be able to spend the full time necessary on long run 
planning, over and above the time taken by the revisions of the zoning by-law. 

If the Planning Board could constitute a special subcommittee charged with 
responsibility for this planning, perhaps enlarging the whole board simultaneous- 
ly, it is believed that the Town would benefit. 

3. On the financial question, it is recommended that a Capital Expenditures 
committee be appointed annually by the Moderator to review proposed capital 
expenditures of the various departments and boards of the town each year and 
express an opinion as to the financial capacity of the Town to support them. Such 
Committees have been established in a number of other towns - Reading, Lexing- 
tion, Wellesley, - and are increasingly regarded as a useful adjunct to the regular 
Finance Committee which is absorbed in the examination of current expenses. It 
is important to keep the prospective needs of the town under constant examination 
in this period of rapid growth and change. 

4. The growing complexity of the Town' s problems requires continued inno- 
vation in the art of government. The assistant to the Selectmen is one welcome 
change. A certain number of long-range problems are being neglected because of 
the limits of capacity of the Town' s officers and employees, particularly ques- 
tions like land-takings for roads, negotiations over the route of a sidewalk be- 
tween the schools, etc., which are time consuming and involved. It is suggested 
that more use be made of one man subcommittees chosen from among the many 
able residents of the town who have not been elected or appointed to Town service. 



Long- Ter 







ctfully submitted, 
1 Requirements Committee 



William M. Rand, Chairman 



cSflA, P l&dkJkty - 



tic**- Qj, c . ( 

:eiiry De/ C. Ward 



J- 



Henry uei 

for the Selectmen 



C. P. Kindleberger, Clerk 



/oL^^.fo"^/. 



V 



U^A- i~$& 



Charles K. Fitts ' 

for the Finance Committee 



£L 



^t, Cj£ 



M. E. Shank 



Alan McClennen 

for the Planning Board 



Appendix 1. Memorandum by M. E. Shank: "Analysis of Expenditures for 
Maintenance and Improvement of the Road Net of Lincoln." 

Appendix 2. Comparative Financial Statistics of Representative Towns 



30 



APPENDIX 1 



ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND IMPROVEMENT 
OF THE ROAD NET OF LINCOLN 



I. GENERAL OBJECTIVE: - 

Next to schools, highways are the second most expensive item in the 
tax- supported budget of the town. In expenditures for highways, it is sometimes 
difficult (except where equipment is concerned) to separate capital and operating 
expenditures. This is due to the fact that both types of expense contribute to the 
quality of an existing road system. Further, in roads, perhaps more than in any 
other type of structure, the degree of maintenance required is sharply affected 
by the money spent for capital improvement of existing highways. For this rea- 
son, both capital and maintenance expenses for roads will be discussed in this 
report, as well as expenses for capital equipment. 

The objective of this analysis, therefore, will be to examine the possible 
limits of expenses which the town might undertake, to draw conclusions regard- 
ing feasibility of such expenses, and to make recommendations for a realistic 
program for the consideration of the Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee, 

II. BUDGETS FOR 1955 AND 1956 

For comparative purposes, the budget for 1955, and the approximate pro- 
posed budget for 1956 are set forth below: In figures for Chapter 90 construction 
denoted by an asterisk (*), one quarter of the cost is borne by the town, the re- 
mainder being reimbursed by state and county. In Chapter 90 maintenance fig- 
ures, denoted (**), one third is borne by the town, the remainder being reim- 
bursed by state and county. 

Items and Remarks 1955 1956 

1. ** Ch. 90 Maint. 

2. * Ch. 90 Constr. (Trapelo Rd. at Center) 

3. Wages 

4. General Expense (Fuel, light, etc. 

5. Highway Maint., general (Asphalt, Sand, etc. 

6. Snow Removal 

7. Equip. Maint. & Supplies (Truck maint., paint, 

sign posts, etc.) 
■ 8. Street Lights 

TOTALS $54,293 $66,543 

Of the foregoing figures, Items 4, 6, 7, 8 comprising General Expense, 
Snow Removal, Equipment Maintenance, and Street Lighting, totaling approximately 
$15,500, may properly be regarded as overhead items of fairly fixed size. As such, 
they do not enter into the discussion below. 

III. CLASSIFICATION OF ROADS BY USAGE 

For purposes of maintenance and capital expense figures, it is useful to 
divide the road net, perhaps arbitrarily, into three categories, as shown below. 

31 



$ 4,500 


$ 4,500 


12,000 


20,000 


14,500 


14,500 


700 


750 


8,000 


12,000 


3,500 


3,500 


5,000 


5,000 


6,093 


6,093 



Of course, such division implicitly assumes that road expense should be related 
to frequency of use. 

Class A Roads - Roads which carry, or potentially should carry, 
traffic around the town. All but one of these are either state 
maintained or Chapter 90: 

Routes 2 and 2 A and Airport Road - State maintained at no 
expense to town. It is a fair assumption that Route 2 
will continue to be state maintained, even if superseded 
by the proposed throughway. 

Route 126 - Chapter 90 

Route 117 - Chapter 90 

Old County Road - May or may not be Chapter 90, but could 
be placed under Chapter 90 with little or no difficulty. 

Class B Roads - Main town thoroughfares which carry, or should 
carry traffic destined to points inside the town. Some of these are 
Chapter 90 roads: 

Lincoln Road 

Bedford Road (Maintained by Ch. 90 between Rt. 2 and 2A) 

Sandy Pond Road (This may well belong in Class C) 

Codman Road (Maintained under Ch. 90) 

Trapelo Road (Maintained under Ch. 90) 

Lexington Road. 

Class C Roads - Secondary roads, for mainly local traffic. These 
roads comprise all of the roads not listed above. In great measure 
these roads are narrow, winding, tree shaded, of fair to poor sur- 
face. They are usually considered both picturesque and beautiful in 
the eyes of the townspeople, perhaps even more so than the roads 
listed as Class B. Of these roads, Old Bedford Rd. and Winter St. 
have had Chapter 90 layouts prepared, but have never been rebuilt. 
It is fair to say that most of these secondary roads are steadily 
deteriorating. Road shoulders have slowly moved inward and drain- 
age ditches have disappeared. This has hastened the break-up of 
surfaces, as water has accumulated on the paving. 

The total length of the roads in town, exclusive of wholly state maintainec 
roads, is approximately 41 miles. Of these 41 miles, 9 miles are Chapter 90 
maintained (falling in both Classes A and B above). Of the Class B roads, there 
are approximately 11 miles which are not maintained under Chapter 90. Class C 
roads comprise approximately 21 miles. Briefly then, maintenance and/or im- 
provement costs involve: 

9 miles under Chapter 90, of Class A and B roads, 
11 miles at wholly town expense of Class B roads, 
21 miles at wholly town expense of Class C roads. 



32 



IV. POSSIBLE LIMITS OF EXPENDITURES FOR ROAD MAINTENANCE AND 
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT. 

1. Maintenance 

a) Non- Chapter 90 Roads - Other than the Chapter 90 roads, none 
of the town roads have a satisfactory base of crushed rock. This causes the 
surface to break up fairly quickly. Thus, the maintenance costs are much 
higher than they would otherwise be. In the 1955 budget, Item 5, Highway 
Maintenance was $8,000. Of this, $5,000 was for general maintenance, and 
$3,000 was used to resurface a little over 1 mile of Bedford Road near the 
Town House. In the 1956 budget, the total figure for maintenance is $12,000. 
Of this, $6,000 is earmarked for resurfacing of about 2 miles of what is here 
categorized as Class B roads, and $6,000 is for general maintenance. At this 
increased 1956 rate of resurfacing, all 11 miles of non-chapter 90 Class B roads 
could be resurfaced in 5j years. At the end of this period, the initially accom- 
plished portion of resurfacing would be in need of re-doing. Thus, the increased 
figure of $6,000 for resurfacing will just enable the town to keep abreast of its 
present position for non-chapter 90 Class B roads alone, to say nothing of Class C, 

If it is assumed that money for resurfacing will continue to be applied to 
Class B roads, then, in effect, in 1955 there was $5,000 of the General Mainten- 
ance money allotted for Class C roads, and in 1956 it will be $6,000. For the 
21 miles of Class C roads, it seems that a reasonable minimal objective would 
be to keep them safe, patched, occasionally oiled, narrow spots widened from 
time to time, shoulders cut back, notably unsafe spots eliminated, and drainage 
improved. This would just about enable the roads to meet increasing safety 
standards of the future. A realistic figure for the cost of such work is about 
$15,000 per year, or roughly two and one -half times the 1956 figure. This is 
equivalent to about 15 cents per foot per year. 

b) Chapter 90 Maintenance - The sum of $4,500 per year is allotted 
to the 9 miles of Chapter 90 roads. This enables about one mile of maintenance 
per year. Thus, the roads are, in effect, maintained once every 10 years. This 
is insufficient, and the first-repaired section is bound to be in bad shape by the 
time the last-repaired section is finished. To remedy this, the Chapter 90 main- 
tenance budget should be doubled to $9,000, so that every mile of Chapter 90 road 
could be attended to once in 5 years. 

c) Total minimal maintenance budget - From a) and b) above it 
would appear that the sum of $21,000 per year is needed for General Maintenance, 
and the sum of $9,000 per year for Chapter 90 maintenance to keep the town roads 
in as good, or slightly better condition than is now the case. To utilize such funds, 
however, an additional full-time employee, plus two summer employees, would 
have to be added to the Highway Department. This would entail an additional 
figure of $5,000 per year. 

A minimal yearly maintenance budget, exclusive of any new construction 
(new construction was $12,000 in 1955, $20,000 in 1956), then for the road net as 
it now exists would be: 



33 



ITEM RECOMMENDED PROPOSED 

AMOUNT INCREASE 



1. ^Chapter 90 Maint. $ 9,000 $ 4,500 

3. Wages 19,500 5,000 

4. 6, Overhead (comprising General 15,500 9,000 
7, 8, Snow Removal, Equip. Maint., 

Lights) 

5. Highway maintenance, general 21,000 9,000 

$65,000 $18,500 

* Two thirds of Ch. 90 Maint. reimbursed by county and state. 
NOTE: Item numbers refer to items listed in Part II above. 

2. Capital Road Improvements: 

a) Non-Chapter 90 Roads - The most obvious capital improvement 
for non-chapter 90 roads would be to dig them up and relay them with a sound 
foundation. Such a course would, in the long run, reduce maintenance costs on 
Class B roads (which now need resurfacing about every five years) to about 
20% of present expense. For Class B roads not maintained under Chapter 90, 
the cost of this would be about $8 per foot, or $40,000 per mile. It would not be 
economical to rebuild less than one mile per year, and if this were done, the 
whole non-chapter 90 Class B category would be done in 11 years. This would 
finally result in the present $6,000 annual figure for quintennial resurfacing 
being reduced to about $1200, or a total savings of $4800 per year. If this cost 
of $40,000 per mile per year were financed out of taxes, it would necessitate an 
increase of over 8% in the budget and tax rate, based on 1955 figures. If financed 
by borrowing at 2% for 20 years, the average interest and amortization would be 
$2400 per year. Thus, two miles of rebuilt road, financed by borrowing would 
swallow up the total annual maintenance saving. In eleven years, after all Class 
B roads had been rebuilt, the town would then be carrying about $24,000 per year 
in interest and amortization. This figure represents about 5% of the total town 
budget and tax rate, based on 1955 figures. The maximum cost would continue 
annually from the eleventh year following the first mile of rebuilding, through 
the twentieth year, and would represent a total debt of $440,000. 

In view of the foregoing, it seems unwise to contemplate the cost of puttin. 
a good foundation under the 21 miles of Class C roads. In the case of the Class C 
roads, the work would be of little value unless accompanied by straightening, 
widening, and probably wholesale tree removal. Aside from esthetic objections, 
a cost of about $12 per foot, or $60,000 per mile would have to be contemplated. 
This figure is exclusive of land taking. 

b) Chapter 90 Roads - In the case of Chapter 90 roads, where the 
state and county assume 75% of the cost of construction, many more things are 
possible, if not probable. These are: 

(1) Extension of Old County Road from new Route 2, through 
Waltham to Conant Road and Rt. 117: - Assuming the new Rt. 2 
remains about where it is in the region of Hobbs Brook reservoir, 
a cloverleaf could be introduced at the point where Old County Road 

34 



connects. Lexington Road and Page Road could then be brought down 
parallel to Rt. 2 to join such a cloverleaf. With the cooperation of 
Waltham, the road could be widened and straightened to join Conant 
Road and Rt. 117. The right of way exists, both in Waltham and 
Lincoln, from Rt. 2 to Conant Road. There is a total of 11,000 feet 
of the road in Lincoln to be rebuilt. It would cost about $15 per foot 
average, exclusive of land taking, or a total of $165,000, of which 
Lincoln would pay $41,250. This addition would constitute the last 
link in a complete circumferential road net and would take much 
traffic away from the center of town. 

(2) Rt. 126 from Codman Rd. to Way land line: - This now 
constitutes a narrow part of Rt. 126. It is 6,000 ft. long, and at $10 
per foot for widening, exclusive of land taking, would cost $60,000. 
The town' s share would be $15,000. 

(3) Rt. 126 at Henderson's Corner to Concord line: - This 
section could be straightened with a resulting increase in safety. 

It is 2000 ft. long, and since considerable relocation would be neces- 
sary, it would cost $15 per foot exclusive of land taking, or $30,000. 
The town' s share would be $7500. 

(4) Rt. 117 from Weston line to Concord line: - Someday this 
section may become a bottle neck. It is 16,500 ft. long, and for 
widening and straightening would cost about $12 per foot, exclusive 
of land taking. This totals $198,000, of which the town' s share 
would be $49,500. 

It should be noted that with the exception of Old County Road, about which 
there is some question, all of these roads are already under Chapter 90. Thus 
rebuilding of them would not of itself greatly affect town maintenance figures for 
non-chapter 90 roads. 

V. CAPITAL EQUIPMENT 

1. Trucks - The Highway Department now owns five trucks consisting 
of two 1946 Whites, one 1948 White, one 1951 Ford and one 1952 Chevrolet pick- 
up. With the exception of the pickup all are at the age where cost of upkeep 
becomes high. The department would probably be better served if it owned two 
light and two heavy trucks, plus a pickup, instead of three light and one heavy. 

It would seem advisable to trade in at least one truck per year for the next three 
years, and two trucks in the fourth year, as scheduled below. Following this, 
trucks should be traded regularly when they become three years old: 

Trade one in 1956 to purchase one light truck $3,000 

Trade one in 1957 to purchase one heavy truck 4,500 

Trade one in 1958 to purchase one heavy truck 4,500 

Trade two in 1959 to purchase one light truck and one pickup 5,000 

There may be difficulty in phasing subsequent truck purchases, because of the 
necessity for items listed below. 

2. Road Roller - The town does not own and badly needs a road roller. 

35 



It now rents one, when needed, at $80 per day. One could be purchased for 
$6800. It is recommended that this be done as soon as possible, preferably 
in 1956. In future it will have to be replaced every 10 years. 

3. Grader - The town owns a 1946 motor grader which is not as pow- 
erful or as readily manipulated as is necessary for economical usage. This 
should be replaced, at a cost of $10,000 by 1958 at the latest. In future it will 
have to be replaced every 5 years. 

4. Frontend Loader - The present 1949 Hough Payloader is excessivel; 
expensive and troublesome to maintain. It could be traded for a new one for 
$8000 and should probably be done in 1957. In future it will have to be replaced 
every five years. 

5. Street Sweeper - The present 1949 street sweeper, purchased used 
appears to be satisfactory. It will have to be replaced in 1959, and every 10 
years thereafter at a cost of $5,000. 



VI. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS 



1. Capital Improvements to Roads 



a) Chapter 90 Construction: Of all possible Chapter 90 constructioi 
items, the most obviously advantageous one is the reconstruction and extension 
of Old County Road from a Rt. 2 cloverleaf to Rt. 117 at a total cost of about 
$165,000, of which the town' s share would be $41,250. This would complete the 
town' s circumferential highways, and keep through traffic out of the center. Of 
course, much depends upon future decisions to be made by the state concerning 
Rt. 2. 

Reconstruction of parts of Rt. 126 outlined above might be desirable, 
but not necessary. It seems pointless, especially at Henderson' s Corner, until 
firm plans are drawn up concerning Rt. 2, and the eventual location of Rt. 126 
where it passes Walden Pond State Reservation. Thus Rt. 126 is an item which 
might well be deferred pending such developments. 

Reconstruction of Rt. 117 is, obviously, a luxury, and an item which 
might not become necessary. 

Judging from past attitudes of the townspeople, there would be distinct 
opposition to the improvement of non-chapter 90 Class B or Class C roads by 
Chapter 90 means, because of the required road width, straightening and tree 
cutting involved. 

b) Rebuilding of Class B roads: Rebuilding of 11 miles of Class B 
Roads to give them an adequate foundation would, as noted, cost $40,000 per 
mile. To finance a mile per year out of revenue would increase the tax rate 
approximately 8%, a measure which probably cannot be afforded, in the light of 
necessary future school construction. To borrow such money seems unsound, 

36 



and would probably jeopardize the debt position of the town. Moreover, the 
servicing and amortization of such debt would not nearly be covered by the 
resulting savings in maintenance. Finally, the rebuilding of Class B roads 
would still leave unsolved the much greater problem of improvement of 21 
miles of Class C roads. 

This is not to say that improvement of the existing Class B and Class C 
road net is to be avoided. Increasing traffic, due to increased population, will 
eventually necessitate that the entire road system be modernized, perhaps even 
at the expense of certain esthetic considerations. It is clearly indicated, how- 
ever, that such improvement must be delayed until (1) the tax base valuation 
for the town is greater, and (2) until the demand for new school construction 
slackens. Point (1) implies that when the town population reaches 5,000 in say, 
twenty years, the total mileage of road will still be the same. This will obvious- 
ly not be the case. The road net is bound to expand. If, however, all new devel- 
opment road construction is required to be built to a superior standard (as is 
now being considered by the planning board) then some of the taxes derived 
from such new developments can be applied to improvement of the existing 
road net. Exactly when this will be possible is difficult to foresee. It is a 
subject which should be closely followed by such capital requirments committees 
which may be appointed in the future. 

In considering various possible highway improvements the town must 
realize that in any case, there is no accident-proof road system. Winding, 
narrow roads and wide, high speed roads each have their own hazards. The 
town should consider carefully, and on a long-range basis, what kind of roads 
it really wants. 

2. Road Maintenance 



While annual maintenance cost of roads is not properly within the scope 
of the capital requirements committee, the degree of such maintenance has a 
marked effect on necessary capital outlays of the future. Apparently a mainten- 
ance increase of $18,500 per year is in order to merely keep us abreast of our 
current position. This sum would consist of $4,500 for Chapter 90 maintenance 
(of which two-thirds is reimbursed to the town), $9,000 for general maintenance 
and $5,000 for wages. It can be argued that this sum could better be spent re- 
building road foundations at $8 per foot, or somewhat less than half a mile per 
year. This would mean rebuilding the Class B roads in 22 years, and the Class 
C roads in something more than 42 years. This is spreading the money too 
thinly to be of real use. 

3. Capital Equipment 

This item outlined in V above, when seen in perspective, is really the 
most easily facilitated and cheapest part of the highway program. It seems 
obvious that the Highway Department equipment should be brought up to date at 
all possible speed. Much of the equipment is not now reliable. In fact, it would 
be impossible to fully take advantage of an increased maintenance program, un- 
less the equipment is gradually replaced. 

VII RECOMMENDATIONS 

The following recommended courses of action seem in order: 

37 



1. Chapter 90 Construction 

(a) Old County Road - A study should be instituted with all possible 
urgency. If indicated by this study, the town should cooperate with Waltham, 
and the state to extend Old County Road to run from Rt. 2 to Rt. 117. This will 
cost about $165,000, of which the town' s share will be $41,250. 

(b) Improvement of Rt. 126 should not be considered for the time 
being. 

(c) Consideration of improvement of Rt. 117 should be delayed 
indefinitely. 

2. Capital Improvement of Non- Chapter 90 Roads 

(a) New foundations: New foundations for existing Class B or 
Class C roads should not be considered until the town has a broader tax 
valuation, and the need for new school construction drops off. Just when 
this will occur is not clear, but it will certainly be beyond 1961 and possibly 
beyond 1966. However, all new development roads accepted by the town should 
be built to superior standards of construction. 

3. Capital Equipment 

Capital equipment of the Highway Department should be replaced accord 
ing to the schedule below. Without such replacement, satisfactory and economic 
maintenance will not be possible. 

1956: Light truck $3,000 

Road roller 6,800 

1957: One heavy truck 4,500 

One front end loader 8,000 

1958: One heavy truck 4,500 

One grader 10,000 

1959: One light truck and 

One pickup truck 5,000 

One street sweeper 5,000 

1960: One light and one heavy truck 7,500 

1961 Triennial replacement of trucks, 10,000 to 15,000 

-66: replacement of road roller, loader, per year 

grader. 

1966 Replacement of equipment, per year 10,000 to 15,000 

-76: per year 

4. Annual Maintenance 



This item does not strictly come within the purview of the Capital Requi 
ments Committee. However, it would seem in order that total maintenance fund 
of the department be increased in the amount of $18,500 per year as soon as is 
practicable. 

38 



'VIII SUMMARY 



As a final note, unless the town expenditures for maintenance are 
increased by about $18,500 per year, along with annual capital equipment 
expenditure of $10,000 to $15,000 per year, the present town highway system 
will gradually deteriorate. 



Respectfully submitted, 




M. E. Shank 



39 



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TOM OF LINCOLN 
1957 REPORT 




THE COVER 

The Town appreciates the 
excellent designing by the 
DeCordova Museum of the 
covers for both the 1956 
and 1957 Town Reports. 



Jveporl 



of the Officers and Committees 



of the 



C^own of J^incoLn 



FOR THE YEAR 19 57 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



CALENDAR 

SELECTMEN -- Second and fourth Mondays of each month, 

8 P.M. at the Town House, Clearwater 9-8850 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE — First Tuesday of each month, 8 P.M. 

at the Charles Sumner Smith School, Cl 9-8172 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS — First Wednesday of each month, 8 P.M. 
at the Town House, Clearwater 9-8850 

WATER COMMISSIONERS — Meetings by appointment; call 
Sumner Smith, Clearwater 9-8213 

BOARD OF HEALTH — Meetings by appointment; call Dr. 
Gordon Donaldson, Clearwater 9-8192 

BOARD OF APPEALS — Meetings by appointment; call Town 
House, Clearwater 9-8850 

PLANNING BOARD — Second Wednesday of each month, 8 P.M. 
at the Town House, Clearwater 9-8850 

Population -- 2,949 by 1955 census. 

Town Area -- 8,572 acres. 

1957 Tax Rate -- $68.00 per $1,000 valuation. 

Annual Town Meeting — First Monday in March after the 
fifteenth - March 17, 1958. 

Annual Election of Town Officers -- Saturday following Town 
Meeting, March 22, 1958. 

Qualifications for Registration -- Twelve months continuous 
residence in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
prior to March 17, 1958, and six months 
continuous residence in the Town of Lincoln 
prior to March 17, 1958. 

Town Office — Open daily 8 : 30 A. M. to 5:00 P. M. 
Closed on Saturdays. 

Town Dump -- Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 9 A.M. to 
5 P.M. Sundays, 10 A. M. to 5 P. M. 



CONTENTS 

TOWN CALENDAR 

TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Officers and Committees 1 

Board of Selectmen 10 

Town Clerk 18 

Licenses 30 

FINANCE 

Auditors 31 

Treasurer 33 

Accounting Officer 38 

Collector of Taxes 59 

Board of Assessors 60 

PROTECTION 

Police Department ... 62 

Fire Department 65 

Tree Warden 67 

Civil Defense Agency 68 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 69 

Nursing Committee 71 

Inspector of Animals 73 

Public Assistance Agent 74 

Mosquito Control 76 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 78 

Board of Appeals 81 

Building Code Board of Appeals 84 

Inspectors 8 5 

Water Commissioners 86 

Highway Department .... 88 

Cemetery Commissioners 89 

Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee .... 89 

Police-Fire Station Building Committee 90 

School Building Committee 91 

Land Conservation Trust 93 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION . 

Bemis Free Lectures 94 

Library Trustees 95 

Recreation Committee 99 

DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park 101 

Lincoln Scholarship Fund 113 

School Committee 115 

Regional School Committee 131 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 145 

Valuation List 151 

Trust Funds 173 

FINANCE COMMITTEE . . . 183 

WARRANT FOR 1958 196 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 

MODERATOR 

Term Expire 
Donald P. Donaldson 1960 

TOWN CLERK 
William H. Davis 1958 

SELECTMEN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Charles K. Fitts, Chairman 1959 

William T. King 1958 

Elliott V. Grabill 1960 

ASSESSORS 

Frederick H. Greene, Jr., Chairman 1958 

Elmer H. Ziegler 1959 

William H. Rand, Jr 1960 

TREASURER 
Frederick B. Taylor 1958 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
William H. Davis 1959 

AUDITOR 
Louis C. Farley, Jr 1958 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

John W. Carman, Chairman 1959 

Ernest P. Neumann 1958 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 1960 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Sumner Smith, Chairman 1959 

Henry Warner 1958 

Edward S. Taylor 1960 

TREE WARDEN 

Robert Ralston (resigned) 1958 

Albert S. Brooks (appointed) 1958 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Gordon A. Donaldson, Chairman 1958 

Walter L. Hill 1959 

Ellen DeN. Cannon (resigned) 1960 

Lucy E. Bygrave (appointed) 1958 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Term Expires 

Victor A. Lutnicki, Chairman 1958 

John W. Carman 1959 

William A. Wilson (deceased) 1960 

Ellen DeN. Cannon (appointed) 1958 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

IT. Arnold MacLean, Chairman 1958 

Warren F. Flint 1960 

George E. Cunningham (resigned) 1959 

James DeNormandie 1959 

PLANNING BOARD 

Alan McClennen, Chairman 1959 

Katharine S. White, Clerk 1960 

Everett A. Black 1958 

Walter F. Bogner 1961 

George H. Kidder 1962 

MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK 

Albert S. Brooks 1958 

C. Lee Todd 1958 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Clement C. Sawtell, Chairman 1958 

Richard F. Schroeder 1959 

William T. King . . . 1960 

TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND FOR FREE PUBLIC LECTURES 

Christopher W. Hurd, Chairman 1958 

Mabel H. Todd 1959 

Paul Brooks 1960 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

Roland C. MacKenzie, Chairman 

George G. Tarbell 

Alice G. Meriam 

Charles K. Fitts, Chairman, Board of Selectmen, ex officio 
John W. Carman, Chairman, School Committee, ex officio 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
A Directors 

John Quincy Adams 1960 

Polly F. Brown (resigned) 1959 

Paul W. Cook, Jr. (appointed) 1959 

A. Bradlee Emmons 1961 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 1958 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
B Directors 

Term Expires 
Stanley Heck - appointed by Library Trustees . 1958 
William N. Swift - appointed by School 

Committee 1959 

George Wells - appointed by Selectmen .... 1960 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ACCOUNTING OFFICER AND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
M. Elizabeth Causer 1958 

PUBLIC WELFARE AGENT 
M. Elizabeth Causer 1958 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 
Raymond Maher 1958 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Leo J. Algeo 1958 

POLICE OFFICERS 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1958 

James J. Diamond (deceased) 1958 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 19 58 

Frank W. Gordon, Jr 1958 

Michael McHugh 1958 

CONSTABLES 

Leo J. Algeo 1958 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1958 

James J. Diamond (deceased) 1958 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 1958 

George E. Cunningham 1958 

DOG OFFICERS 

Leo J. Algeo 1958 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1958 

James J. Diamond (deceased) 1958 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 1958 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Orrin C. Wood 1958 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

SPECIAL POLICE 

John T. Algeo Elliott V. Grabill 

Robert II. Booth Ernest L. Johnson 

Floriy Campobasso William T. King 

Joseph Campobasso Harry B. Knowles, Jr. 

John Cook Harry B. Knowles, 3rd. 

Joseph Cotoni Karl F. Lahnstein 

Henry J. Davis Edward D. Rooney 

James DeNormandie Carl Smith 

William Doherty Francis J. Smith 

Andrew J. Dougherty Sumner Smith 

Henry Draper David Spooner 

Charles K. Fitts Alanson II. Sturgis, Jr. 

Francis T. Gilbert Henry Warner 

John Gilbert Orrin C. Wood 

FIRE ENGINEERS 

Term Expire 

Andrew J. Dougherty 1958 

Frank W. Gordon 1958 

William M. Dean '. 1958 

FOREST WARDEN 
Andrew J. Dougherty 1958 

DEPUTY FOREST WARDEN 
Frank W. Gordon 1958 

MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 
Albert Brooks 1958 

PETROLEUM INSPECTOR 
Andrew J. Dougherty 1958 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Eveleth R. Todd 1958 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
William M. Dean . . .- 1958 

PLUMPING INSPECTOR 
Daniel J. Murphy 1958 

WIRING INSPECTOR 
William M. Dean 1958 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Term Expire 

John W. White, Chairman 1962 

Henry B. Hoover 1958 

Thomas B. Adams 1959 

Hans Van Leer 1960 

William M. Dean (Resigned) 1961 

Warren Flint (Appointed) 1961 

Betty L. Lang, Associate Member 1959 

George H. Kidder, Associate Member (Resigned) . 1958 

William N. Swift, Associate Member (Appointed) 1958 

BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 

Lawrence B. Anderson, Chairman 1960 

William A. Halsey 1958 

Stephen Ilerthel 1959 

Associate Members 

Robert Bygrave 1958 

Walter Belanger 1958 

Donald Loveys 1958 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Henry J. Davis 1960 

Manley B. Boyce 1958 

Andrew J. Dougherty 1959 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk, ex officio . . . 1958 

MEMBER OF DISTRICT NURSING COMMITTEE 

Louise H. McClennen. 1958 

FENCE VIEWERS 

George G. Tarbell 1958 

Guilbert Winchell 1958 

FIELD DRIVERS 

Albert S. Brooks 1958 

Richard Bailey 1958 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Albert Avery, III, Chairman 1958 

John M. Barnaby 1958 

Mary Belanger 1958 

Astrid L. Donaldson . 1958 

John B. Garrison 1958 

Ernest L. Johnson 1958 

James Mar 1958 

Roland W. Robbins 1958 

Edward D. Rooney 1958 

Sadie J. Sherman 1958 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

SURVEYOR OF CORD WOOD 

Term Expire; 
Albert Brooks 1958 

VETERANS' AGENT 
Joseph Campobasso 1958 

CARETAKER OF TOWN IIALL 
Orrin C. Wood 1958 

ROADSIDE BEAUT IF ICAT ION COMMITTEE 

Alice Smith 1958 

Anne Black 1958 

Mabel H. Todd 1958 

Louise H. McClennen 1958 

BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 
Walter L. Hill Walter Bergquist 

George H. Kidder 

BY-LAW COMMITTEE 
Frederick B. Taylor Kenneth Bergen 

Charles Y. Wadsworth 

EXECUTIVE BOARD OF THE COMMUNITY COUNCIL 
AT BEDFORD AIR BASE 
Sumner Smith William M. Rand 

INSURANCE POLICY STUDY COMMITTEE 
Anthony Faunce Ernest Fuller 

George G. Tarbell, Jr. 

SELECTMEN'S CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 
George G. Tarbell Sumner Smith 

William M. Rand Malcolm Donaldson 

Robert H. Booth James DeNormandie 

Arthur E. Thiessen 

LEGAL ADVISOR 
John W. White 

TOWN HISTORIAN 
Edith B. Farrar 

JURY LIST. 1957 
Name Residence Occupation 

Stuart B. Avery Lincoln Road Civil Engineer 

Gertrude C. Bliss Sandy Pond Road Housewife 

Edith Bogner Baker Bridge Road Housewife 



6 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Name 
George U. Browning, Jr 
Warren Carstensen 
Robert T. Church 
Robert P. Condit 
Dorothy B. Crawford 
Elinor S. DeFord 
Elizabeth H. Doherty 
Eliot DuBois 
Harold W. Foley 
Norman W. Fradd 
Frederick W. Greer 
Russell Haden, Jr. 
Maurice K. Herlihy 
Stephen W. Herthel 
Harrison Hoyt 
Lucretia B. Hoover 
Eliot Hubbard, 3rd 
Irma Kistiakowsky 
Emily K. Kubik 
James V. Lennon 
Harold S. Liddick 
John F. Loud 
Donald C. Loveys 
Lawrence Moore 
Ethan A. Murphy 
David D. Ogden 
Eleanor A. Pallotta 
Catherine A. Rowe 
Mary C. Van Leer 
Leslie M. Willard 



Residence 
Conant Road 
Old Concord Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Concord Road 
Weston Road 
Weston Road 
Tower Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Mill Street 
Grasshopper Lane 
Huckleberry Hill 
Weston Road 
So. Great Road 
Concord Road 
Huntley Lane 
Trapelo Road 
Winter Street 
So. Great Road 
Lincoln Road 
Lincoln Road 
Juniper Ridge 
Woods End Road 
Hillside Road 
Trapelo Road 
Pierce Hill Road 
Trapelo Road 
Winter Street 
Winter Street 
Old Sudbury Road 
Giles Road 



Occupat ion 
Farmer 
Retail Fuel 
Port Engineer 
Manufacturer 
Housewife 
Housewi f e 
Housewife 
Engineer 
Investment Off. 
Physical Direct 
Manufacturer 
Prod. Engineer 
AssH, Manager 
Gen 1 !. Manager 
Ass't. Manager 
Housewife 
Buyer 
Housewi f e 
Housewife 
Accountant 
Chemist 

Invest. Counsel 
Construct ion 
Executive 
Instruc tor 
Investments 
Housewi f e 
Real Estate 
Housewi f e 
State House 



Appointed June, 1957 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 



ASSISTANT TREASURER 



M. Elizabeth Causer (Resigned) 
Ann E. Paddock (Appointed) . . 



Term 



Exp i res 

1958 

1958 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 
COMMUNITY NURSE 
Marian N. Ob er 



1958 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



BURIAL AGENT 

Term Expires 



William H. Davis 1958 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Andrew J. Dougherty 1958 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

F. Winchester Denio, Chairman 1960 

William N. Page 1958 

Leonard C. Larrabee 1960 

Paul L. Norton 1959 

Russell L. Haden, Jr. (Resigned) 1959 

John B. Tew 1959 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

Harold S. Cunningham 1958 

William C. Powers 1958 

Helen K. Swanson 1958 

William B. Whalen 1958 

Rev. Francis A. McLaughlin 1958 

FOURTH OF JULY COMMITTEE 

Hamilton R. James 1958 

Thelma W. Cibel 1958 

Gertrude W. Fitts 1958 

William L. Grinnell 1958 

Edward D. Rooney 1958 

LIBRARY ADDITION COMMITTEE 

Kenneth W. Bergen Charles A. Bliss 
Sec or D. Browne Mo r ley M. John 

John B. Tew, (Resigned) 

VETERANS' MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 

J. Lewis Cunningham Richard J. Eaton 

Robert E. White 

LONG-TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 

William M. Rand Maurice Shank 

Charles P. Kindleberger 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

FIRE STATION PLANS COMMITTEE 
Leo J. Algeo Robert H. Booth 

Ernest Johnson Andrew J. Dougherty 

William N. Swift 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE 
Andrew J. Dougherty George H. Kidder 

Gerard C. Henderson, Jr. Ernest P. Neumann 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 



APPOINTED BY EAST MIDDLESEX MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMISSION 

MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMISSIONER 
David L. Garrison 



APPOINTED BY THE CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 



MEMBERS OF AUXILIARY POLICE FORCE 



Walter Belanger 
Walter Bonia 
Sheldon A. Briggs 
Secor Browne 
Stanley Cibel 
Robert C. Day 
Allen Dougherty 
Richard J. Eaton 
Warren F. Flint 
Donald A. Gilfoy 
Lowell Holl ingsworth 
Eliot Hubbard, 3rd 
Medford E. Huntley 
David W. Kirkpatrick 
Harold Lawson 
Charles MacFarland 
H. Arnold MacLean 
James W. Mar 
Gerald Fahringer 



John W. McLellan 
Thomas R. Morse 
W. Newton Nelson 
Foster Nystrom 
William Powers 
Roland W. Robbins 
Allston Riley 
Charles A. Snelling 
Howard Snelling 
Henry Sturm 
Didrick Tonseth 
Robert Thorson 
John B. Warner 
G. Arnold Wiley 
Edwin L. Williams 
Arthur Wit ham 
Henry Woods 
Thomas K. Worthing ton 



Csown (government 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Admini strat ion 

Pursuant to the close of the Town Meeting in 1957 and 

the re-election of Mr. Elliott V. Grabill for a term of 

three years, the Board convened on Monday, March 25, 1957, 
and elected Charles K. Fitts, Chairman. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Causer was re-appointed to the position 
of Executive Secretary to the Selectmen. 

Under authorization by the Town the Selectmen petitioned 
the Director of Accounts to install the State Accounting 
System in accordance with Section 35, Chapter 44 of the 
General Laws, as amended. Conversion to this accounting 
system was completed in April and Mrs. Elizabeth Causer 
was appointed Accounting Officer as required by Law. 
Monthly statements of. expenditures and budget balances are 
sent to every department head making it easier to regulate 
commitments within the authorized budgets. 

Administration of Town affairs and responsibilities 
therein can be influenced by Town By-Laws. In order to 
evaluate all areas where revision might strengthen our 
form of Town Government, the Selectmen, under date of 
April 1, 1957, appointed a Committee to make a study of 
our By-Law structure. Serving on this Committee are 
Frederick B. Taylor (appointed Chairman by the Committee), 
Kenneth Bergen and Charles Wadsworth. Although a great 
deal of progress has been made it is felt that more time 
and consultation will be needed before any recommendations 
can be made to the Town. 

Town Hall 

In reviewing the condition of the Town Hall, work was 
completed during 1957 as authorized. The slate roof was 
completely replaced with heavy duty asphalt shingles at a 
cost of $3,500.00 and the Town has a ten year guarantee 
from the contractor covering all deficiencies in this re- 
placement. Construction changes involving the lower Town 
Hall and offices were completed in July. Facilities are 
now available to cover any contingent space requirements. 

With the removal of Police Headquarters to the new Fire 
and Police Department Building, the entire lower floor of 

10 



SELECTMEN 

the Town Hall can be used for general town business offices, 

We are recommending the expenditure of approximately 
$1,375.00 to be made this year to complete interior paint- 
ing of the lower hall and repainting of all exterior trim. 
In reviewing the maintenance requirements of the Town Hall 
with the Finance Committee, it was felt that a little done 
each year will bring the building up to acceptable stan- 
dards. 

The Town is indebted to the Garden Club for their 
generous gift both in planning and planting the outside 
Garden. This has added tremendously to the appearance 
of the building. We are also very grateful to the 
deCordova Museum who so capably designed the new Town Hall 
sign. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire Department 

In dealing with the present and planning for the future 
we sometimes forget the contribution of the past. In this 
regard the Town owes Mr. Matthew Doherty a debt of grati- 
tude. Certain sacrifices have been made by him over the 
years so that the Town could continue to store its fire 
equipment in his garage. The Selectmen are appreciative 
of the tolerance exhibited by Matthew Doherty and his 
willingness to cooperate with us at all times. 

Under present schedules the Fire Department hopes to 
occupy its part of headquarters by March 1, 1958. With 
this occupancy we are recommending certain changes in the 
way of active Fire Department coverage. Although daytime 
driving will still be dependent upon the response of call 
men we are requesting an on the job driver from 8:00 P.M. 
to 7:00 A. M. This means that during the night time hours 
immediate movement of apparatus will be possible. 

The firemen assigned to this duty shall also be held 
responsible for the cleaning, general maintenance and work- 
ing order of all fire apparatus housed in this building. 

Further steps will be taken during 1958 to establish a 
training officer. It has been suggested to the Board of 
Fire Engineers that Mr. William Dean be sent to Fire Train- 
ing School, thus enabling him to establish a training pro- 
gram for the Fire Department involving all phases of modern 
fire fighting. 

11 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



In order completely to equip the new Pirsch truck and 
bring to satisfactory standards the two Diamond T trucks, 
this year's operating budget includes funds for the re- 
placement and addition of fire hose along with other fit- 
tings affecting the general efficiency of present equipment. 

As indicated last year the 1936 Chevrolet is being 
assigned to Civil Defense. This does not preclude its 
use by the Fire Department when and where the need arises. 

We appreciate the continued unfailing support of the 
officers and men appointed to the Fire Department. 

Police Department 

Considerable time was spent by the Board this year with 
the Chief of Police involving personnel changes. On 
April 15th Patrolman Daniel Maclnnis was promoted to the 
rank of Sergeant. Five applicants were interviewed for 
the position of Patrolman and on April 22, 1957, Frank 
Gordon, Jr. was appointed. 

The untimely death of Patrolman James Diamond on July 
21st created a void in the ranks of experienced service 
within the department. Special Police Officers responded 
to assist in the much needed coverage. 

Again the Board interviewed applicants to fill this 
vacancy and on October 11th appointed Michael McHugh pro- 
visional Patrolman. 

Frank Gordon, Jr. attended the five week State Police 
Training School in the fall and Patrolman McHugh is scheduled 
to attend the spring session of 1958. 

High praise is due Chief Algeo, Sergeant Maclnnis and 
Patrolman Hallett for the reconstruction of our department 
to its present integrated position. 

Steps have been taken to add margins of safety to town 
roads. Approximately ten thousand feet of white safety 
striping was applied to some of the most hazardous curves 
and intersections. Speed posting along Trapelo Road has 
been completed with more to follow during 1958. Vigorous 
enforcement of our traffic regulations has been ordered by 
the Selectmen. Violators, both resident and non-resident, 
shall be dealt with impartially. 



12 



SELECTMEN 



Alarming increase in the national crime pattern is one 
for sober reflection by every Lincoln family. The co- 
operation of an alert citizenry working with the law en- 
forcement division may very well be the answer to curbing 
acts leading to crime. 

The Selectmen wish to compliment Chief Algeo and his 
men for the use of disciplinary action or counseling de- 
pending on offences involving the public. 

Communicat ions 

Central Communications for all Public Safety Departments 
will be established at the Fire and Police Building. 
Incoming telephone and outgoing radio and telephone trans- 
mission will be on a twenty-four hour basis. 

Competent surveys indicated the most economical approach 
to the audible fire alarm signal would be to leave the 
present equipment at the Town Hall, moving only the trans- 
mitter to the new building. Necessary wiring is being 
installed and the by-product gives the town an opportunity 
to add signal boxes, either automatic or manual, at all 
public buildings. 

Monitor radio receivers, coded for fire use only, were 
placed in ten of the call firemen's houses and have con- 
tributed substantially to faster response to fires. 

The communication officer at the fire and police station 
will also serve as general custodian of the building. It 
is the opinion of the Selectmen that full time custodian- 
ship at the Town Hall will be unnecessary and the budget 
reflects a cut-back in this service. 

GENERAL 

On April 22nd the Selectmen received and voted to accept, 
with regret, the resignation of Mr. Robert Ralston, Tree 
Warden. Mr. Albert Brooks was appointed May 13th to fill 
this vacancy and on June 3rd was appointed Moth Superinten- 
dent. 

The 1958 budget reflects a change in policy relative to 
the care of public trees. We are recommending a larger 
sum to be spent on tree pruning. Under plans started this 
year, we feel that diseased Elm tree removal can be accom- 
plished effectively with a lower appropriation. Removal 
costs were bid at a much lower figure than in the past by 

13 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



using the Town Highway Department equipment for disposal. 

In view of the future the Selectmen will give serious 
consideration to a program of tree planting and will make 
specific recommendations at the annual Town Meeting in 1959 

On May 13th, Mr. William Dean was appointed Building 
Inspector; a Building Code Board of Appeals was also ap- 
pointed as follows: 

Lawrence B. Anderson, Chairman, for three years 

Stephen W. Herthel, for two years 

William A. Halsey, for one year 

Associate members for one year: 
Robert Bygrave 
Walter Belanger 
Donald Loveys 

It was with deep regret that we were forced, in July, 
to accept the resignation of Mr. William Costello, who has 
served the Town faithfully as custodian of the Town Dump. 
Mr. Andrew Dougherty was appointed to fill this vacancy. 
Mr. Dougherty has been given full authority to maintain the 
dump in accordance with the regulations. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The recommendations of the Selectmen for last year's 
Town Meeting were approved. The purchase of a new heavy 
duty Mack truck, a new Michigan front end loader and a 
pick-up four wheel drive Jeep for our Superintendent was 
made. The addition of this equipment to the department 
has already paid many dividends in terms of work accom- 
plished. These vehicles were displayed to the Town during 
the 4th of July parade and at the Town Hall at the time of 
"Open House". 

The Selectmen pursued the recommendations made in their 
report of 1956 and held a meeting of abuttors on Farrar 
Road. The layout authorized by the Board was presented 
to the abuttors on a basis of forty feet, with a paved way 
not to exceed eighteen feet. The sentiment recorded at 
this meeting indicated strong objection of this proposed 
layout. 

This is not the first objection to road improvement in 
the town by any means. Your Selectmen propose, through 
its recommendation of increased expenditures for highway 
maintenance, to improve the surface of existing roadways of 

14 



SELECTMEN 



reasonable width. There is much resurfacing to be done 
and the Town must continue the program which got off to 
such a good start this past year. 

We have been in continual touch with the Department of 
Public Works regarding the location of Route #2 , but as yet 
no plans have crystalized for presentation to the Town. 
We will continue to give this matter our close attention. 

The Department now employs five men in addition to the 
Superintendent. It has added to its duties the care of 
the Cemeteries and assists substantially the Tree and Moth 
Department. This in turn has been a financial saving to 
the Town. 

SPECIAL COMMENT 

On January 15th f the Board received a letter from 
George Cunningham, stating that the time had come for him 
to resign as Cemetery Commissioner. 

Very few people can boast of a record such as his. 
His conscientious and faithful service to the Town has been 
an inspiration to all those who have had the good fortune 
of knowing and working with him. 

THE STATE OF THE TOWN 

A decade has passed since an inventory of the Town was 
presented by the Selectmen. The farming community of 
Lincoln has undergone considerable change, yet by compari- 
son with other communities still offers a priceless herit- 
age deserving our utmost efforts to preserve. 

The challenge of these past ten years has stimulated 
many accomplishments but has also added substantially to 
the tax commitment required to support both capital and 
operating expenses. 



15 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

On a direct comparative basis we find the following: 

1948 1957 % inc. 

Inhabitants 1998 3100* 55.2 

Dwellings 529 943 78.3 

Elem. Sch. enrollment 302 702 132.5 

High Sch. enrollment 80 134 67.5 

Zoning 40,000 t SOjOOO 1 100.0 
Units of business 

property 15 19 26.6 
Value of In-Town 

business $52,150. $106,150. 103.5 
Value of Real and 

Personal Property $3,737,777. $7,248,630. 93.9 

Tax rate $ 38. $ 68. 78.9 

* Estimated 

Cumulative Capital Expenditures: 

1948-1957 

Town Hall $ 19,090.65 

Highway Building 42,266.24 

Highway Equipment 43,664,85 

Fire and Police Building 51,515.26 

Fire Apparatus & Equipment 26,759.29 

Library Building 3,430.51 

Elementary Schools 1,006,554.35 

Land Acquisition 38,900.00 

Interest on Bonds 70.887.17 

$1,303,068.32 

1958-1977 
Debt Service: 

Highway Building $ 4,000.00 

Fire and Police Building 100,000.00 

Elementary Schools 858,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 256. 612.00 

$1,218,612.00 

Future capital needs are clearly indicated in the report 
of the Long Term Capital Requirements Committee. We are 
recommending, with the approval of the Finance Committer, 
the establishment of a Stabilization Fund to which would 
be appropriated each year a sum approximating $1.00 on 
the Tax rate (for 1958 $7,500). The purpose of this fund 



16 



SELECTMEN 



is to level off the impact of heavy equipment purchases, 
such as Highway vehicles and Fire trucks. 

Future operating policies can affect the underlying 
economic structure of the Town. From our point of view, 
these future policies should reflect the following: 

1. Commitments sufficient to improve and maintain a 
top flight management and instructional staff in our 
schools. Strict economy should be practiced in all 
other categories of school expenditures. 

2. Adequate but not maximum coverage in other Town 
services . 

3. A consistent policy in relation to the annual 
maintenance of Town property, roads and the replacement 
of equipment. 

4. Adherence to present assessing policies. 

5. Guidance to the Town from Long Range Planning rela- 
tive to its controlled growth, rural atmosphere and 
economic stability. 

The desirability of our community is unchallenged. The 
real challenge rests in the amount of effort all of us are 
willing to make in sustaining the character of the Town. 
We are appreciative of the contribution made this year by 
the administrative boards, committees and employees. 

The overall spirit of our townspeople is the motivating 
factor in sound government and we have the utmost faith in 
the continuance of this interest. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Charles K. Fitts, Chairman 
William T. King 
Elliott V. Grabill 

Board of Selectmen 



17 




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TOWN GOVERNMENT 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events 
and activities and issues licenses and certificates. His 
duties include recording the proceedings at Town Meetings 
and elections, and notifying the Selectmen and other offi- 
cers concerned of appropriations which have been voted. 

The record of Registered Voters of Lincoln is kept at 
the Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in 
the Town should communicate with the Clerk. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 18, 1957 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was called 
to order by the Moderator, Mr. Donald P. Donaldson, at 7:30 
o'clock P. M. The return of the Warrant was read and the 
following business was transacted after the Moderator called 
attention to Article #1 (Election of Officers). 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees, and other officers required by law 
to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Voted: That Albert S. Brooks and C. Lee Todd be elected 
Measurers of Wood and Bark for the ensuing year. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Voted : That the reports of the Town Officers, Commit- 
tees and Trustees as printed in the Town Report be accepted 
and the reports of the following Committees be accepted as 
interim reports and that the Committees and their unexpended 
appropriations be continued: School Building Committee, Fire 
Station Committee, Library Building Committee, Mosquito 
Control Committee, Long Term Capital Requirements Committee, 
Veterans Memorial Committee; and thai? the following reports 
be accepted as final: Public Land Committee, School Building 
Addition No. 2 Committee. 

Article 4. To fix the salaried and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town, and to determine 
whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be author- 
ized to employ for additional compensation any of its mem- 
bers, and to fix additional compensation of such members. 

Voted : That the salaries of the elected officers of 
the Town for the current year be fixed at the following 



18 



TOWN MEETINGS 

amounts respectively: 

Selectmen, each $200.00 

Treasurer 200.00 

Collector of Taxes 2,000.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 
Assessors, other members, 

each 175.00 

Town Clerk 450.00 

Auditor 50.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

Tree Warden 200.00 

Article 5. To raise and appropriate money for the 
necessary and expedient purposes of the Town, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the following unexpended appropriation 
balances be rescinded and the amounts returned to Surplus 
(See page 62, Town Report for 1956): 

Police car $320.44 

School Addition #2 1,324.77 

Bedford Airport Committee 300.09 
Acquisition of Public 

Lands Committee 342.97 

Department of Public Works 

Committee 100.00 

$2,388.27 

Voted : To rescind the remaining unissued balance of 
the Water Main Loan authorized by vote of the Town under 
Article 2 of the Special Town Meeting of July 23, 1956, said 
balance being $10,000.00 

Voted ; That the Town raise and appropriate for the 
1957 fiscal year the ninety-nine separate appropriations 
recommended by the Finance Committee report as printed on 
pages 186 to 191 inclusive of the Town of Lincoln 1956 re- 
port, except that the following shall be raised and appro- 
priated as below in lieu of the amount printed in said 
report: Item 85, Town Reports, - increase $254.86, final 
amount $1,254.86; that in connection with appropriations 
#4, 48, 51, 52, 69, 71, 93, 94 and 95, from the sources 
severally noted, shall be applied thereto and be dealt with 
in the manner noted against the same; that the sum of 
$32,000.00 be applied from free cash to item 88, School 
Building Bonds, and that all of appropriations numbered 96, 
97, 98 and 99 be taken from the Water Works Treasury, and 
for item 95, $10,000.00 be taken from Overlay Surplus, and 
any portion not spent be returned to Overlay Surplus. 



19 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Article 6. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation 
of the revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 
1958, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within 
one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Voted ; That the Town Treasurer with the approval of 
the Selectmen be authorized to borrow money from time to 
time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning January 1, 1958, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 7. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $327.41 to pay the follow- 
ing unpaid 1956 bills: 

Board of Health $ 6.15 

Highways 78.41 

Library 13.00 

Cemetery 172.80 

Recreation 5.75 

Water Department 2.00 

Fire Department 49.30 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $299.49 to pay the following unpaid 1956 bills: 

Board of Health $ 6.15 

Highways 50.49 

Library 13.00 

Cemetery 172.80 

Recreation 5.75 

Water Department 2.00 

Fire Department 49 .30 

$299.49 
Voted : That the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $27.92 to pay the following unpaid 1956 bill: 

Highways $ 27.92 

Article 8. To determine whether the Town will instruct 
the Selectmen to petition the Director of Accounts to in- 
stall the State Accounting System in accordance with Section 
35, Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town instruct the Selectmen to peti- 
tion the Director of Accounts to install the State Account- 
ing System in accordance with Section 35, Chapter 44, Gen- 

20 



TOWN MEETINGS 



eral Laws, as amended. 



Article 9. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $7,500.00 or any other 
sum for the purpose of remodelling the offices and facili- 
ties in the Lower Town Hall, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Voted ; That the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $7,500.00 for the purpose of remodelling the 
offices and facilities in the Lower Town Hall. 

Article 10. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 or any other 
sum to replace the roof on the Town Hall, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sura of $750.00 for the purpose of replacing the roof on 
the Town Hall. 

Article 11. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,750.00 or any other 
sum for the purchase of a Police Cruiser to replace exist- 
ing equipment, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $1,250.00 for the purchase of a Police Cruiser to re- 
place existing equipment. 

Article 12. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $3,283.14, or any other 
sum, for replacement of the pump on Engine 32, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $3,283.14 to replace the pump on Engine 32. 

Article 13. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $17,500.00, or any other 
sum, to purchase a new f-ire truck to replace Engine 33, or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town appropriate the sum of $17,500.00 
for the purchase of a new fire truck to replace Engine 33, 
said sum to be taken from free cash. 

Article 14. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,350.00, or any other 
sum, for the control of poison ivy as defined under Chapter 
40, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $1,350.00 for the control of poison ivy as defined under 
Chapter 40. 



21 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Article 15. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $6,500.00, or any other 
sum, for the purpose of continuing the East Middlesex Mos- 
quito Control Project, as provided under Chapter 252 of the 
General Laws, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $6,500.00 for the purpose of continuing the East Middle- 
sex Mosquito Control Project as provided under Chapter 252 
of the General Laws. 

Article 16. To determine whether the Town will amend 
the Building By-Law of the Town by striking out the whole 
of said by-law, as amended, and by substituting therefor a 
new building by-law, copies of which are on file in the 
offices of the Inspector of Buildings, the Board of Select- 
men, and the Town Clerk, or will otherwise amend said Build 
ing By-Law, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town amend the Building By-Law of the 
Town by striking out the whole of said By-Law, as amended, 
and substituting therefor a new Building By-Law, copies of 
which are on file in the offices of the Inspector of Build- 
ings, the Board of Selectmen, and the Town Clerk. 

(Note: The Building By-Law, with the exception of the 
deletion of the words in Section 2-4 "unless 
fixed by vote of the Town", was approved by the 
Attorney General April 10, 1957.) 

Article 17. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $500.00, or any other sum, 
to print copies of the new Building By-Law, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$500.00 to print copies of the new Building By-Law. 

Article 18. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00, or any other 
sum, to be used by the Planning Board for consultant ser- 
vices for an objective study of the impact of light indus- 
trial and/or commercial zoning upon the Town, or take any 
action relative thereto. - 

Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate $2,000.00 
to be used by the Planning Board for professional services 
toward a comprehensive study and presentation of factual 
data on the current conditions and trends in the Town, in- 
cluding the impact of light industrial, commercial or other 
zoning changes upon the Town. 



22 



TOWN MEETINGS 

Article 19. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sura of $20,100.00, or any other 
sum, to purchase the following Town vehicles to replace 
existing equipment: 

1. Highway Department Truck 

2. Front End Loader (Four wheel drive) 

3. Pick Up Truck 

or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$6,750.00 for the purchase of a heavy duty truck, 1946 White 
truck to be turned in; of this sum $2,610.06 to be taken 
from the Machinery Fund. 

Voted : That the Town appropriate the sura of $10,700.00 
for the purchase of a front end loader, Hough loader to be 
turned in; said sum to be taken from free cash. 

Voted : That the Town raise and appropriate the sura of 
$2,400.00 for the purchase of a pick-up truck, 1952 Chevro- 
let to be turned in. 

Article 20. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds in 
the treasury, a sura of money for the permanent construction 
of Farrar Road, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 21. To determine whether the Town will accept 
as a public way the private road known as Oak Knoll, as 
shown on plan entitled "Plan of land in Lincoln, Mass., 
Fred A. Joyce, Surveyor, dated September 9, 1953" and filed 
in the Land Court as Plan #2094lB, a copy of which is filed 
with Certificate #79039, which is recorded with the Land 
Registration section, Middlesex South District Registry of 
Deeds, Book 525, Page 89; approved by the Planning Board of 
the Town of Lincoln February 3, 1954, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town accept as a public way the pri- 
vate road known as Oak Knoll, as shown on plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in -Lrfncoln, Mass., Fred A. Joyce, Surveyor, 
dated September 9, 1953" and filed in the Land Court as 
Plan //20941B, a copy of which is filed with the Land Regis- 
tration section, Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, 
Book 525, Page 89; approved by the Planning Board of the 
Town of Lincoln, February 3, 1954. 

Article 22. To determine whether the Town will accept 
as a public way the private road known as Acorn Lane, as 
shown on a plan entitled "Plan of land in Lincoln, Mass., 
Rowland A. Barnes &. Company, Civil Engineers, dated October, 
1955" and filed with South Middlesex Registry of Deeds as 



23 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Plan #2463 of 1955, recorded in Registry of Deeds book 
#8644, Page 70, and approved by the Planning Board of the 
Town of Lincoln December 30, 1955, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 23. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
authorize the School Committee in its discretion to enter 
into an agreement with the U. S. Commissioner of Education 
to operate an elementary school to be located on L. G. 
Hanscom Field, Cambridge Research Center, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Voted : To adopt the following Resolution: 

Whereas, under the law, the Town has been requested 
by Air Force Headquarters at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, 
Massachusetts, to undertake pursuant to Public Law 874 of 
the 81st Congress, as amended, the operation of on-base 
facilities for an elementary school about to be constructed 
thereon; and 

Whereas, both on grounds of neighborliness and of 
duty, the Town is desirous of acceding to the request; and 

Whereas, the Town is financially unable to operate so 
large an addition to its present school program on any 
basis other than contractual arrangements which will pro- 
vide timely finances from outside sources, which, in fact, 
are sufficient to meet the actual direct and indirect per 
pupil cost of the additional program; and 

Whereas, the Town has been advised that it is under no 
legal responsibility to undertake the action requested by 
the Air Force; 

Now, therefore, be it resolved that it is the sense of 
this meeting that a decision by the Lincoln School Committee 
and the Lincoln Board of Selectmen, with the advice of the 
Finance Committee, to enter into a cancellable arrangement 
with the United States Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare to operate the requested elementary school under 
the appropriate provisions of State and Federal Law, will 
me et the approval of the Town, provided: 

1. Reasonable contractual provisions can be entered 
into to provide the Town with sufficient funds to carry on 
this project, and 

2. The School Committee, in its operating contract 
or permit or other advice in writing, makes it clear to the 
Air Force Headquarters at Bedford and to the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and Welfare, that the Town will 
expect any School Committee in office to cancel the arrange- 
ment for operating such on-base school as of the close of 
any school year if that Committee or the Selectmen believe 
its continuance is likely to retard improvement in the stan- 

24 






TOWN MEETINGS 

dards of education which the Town may wish to maintain for 
its own children or to result in expense to the Town based 
on the Town's own accounting and allocations. 

Article 24. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
acquire by purchase, gift, eminent domain, or any other way, 
a parcel of land located on Lincoln Road, now or formerly 
owned by the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company 
containing 4400 square feet more or less, together with 
the building thereon, raise and appropriate a sum of money 
therefor, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: To pass over the Article. 

Article 25. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate a sum of money to be used by the School 
Committee in renovating the Telephone Building, so-called, 
on Lincoln Road, for school purposes, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Voted : To pass over the Article, 

Article 26. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,050.00, or any other 
sum, for the purpose of transporting children to Lake Wal- 
den for Red Cross Swimming classes, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,050.00 for use of the Recreation Committee to provide 
transportation and supervision of such transportation to the 
Red Cross Swimming Classes at Walden Pond; that $300.00 for 
supervision be raised by taxation, and $750.00 for trans- 
portation be taken from free cash; and that said sum of 
$750.00 be repaid to the Town if and when collected from 
the children transported. 

Article 27. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $600.00 for permanent improvements 
in the Cemeteries, said sum to be taken from Cemetery Im- 
provement Fund, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Town authorize the transfer of $1,000 
from the Cemetery Investment Fund to the Cemetery Improve- 
ment Account, said sum to be used, at the discretion of the 
Cemetery Commissioners, for improvements of a permanent 
nature in the three Lincoln Cemeteries. 

Article 28. To see if the Town will vote to conduct 
services on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, appoint a 
committee, raise and appropriate the sura of $150.00, or any 
other sum, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Moderator be authorized to appoint a 

25 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

committee of five to plan and carry out exercises on Memo- 
rial Day, the thirtieth of May next, and that the Town 
raise and appropriate the sura of $200.00 for the use of 
such Committee in connection with these exercises. 

Article 29. To see if the Town will vote to celebrate 
Independence Day, the 4th of July, appoint a committee, 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, or any other 
sum, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Moderator be authorized to appoint a 
committee of five to plan a celebration for Independence 
Day, the fourth of July, and that the Town raise and appro- 
priate the sura of $1,200.00 for the use of said Committee. 

Meeting adjourned at 11:30 P. M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 23, 1957 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the 
Annual Town Meeting, the polls were declared open by the 
Moderator at 12 o'clock Noon. Previously the ballot box 
had been inspected and the following Ballot Clerks duly 
sworn: Margaret M. Algeo, Elizabeth J. Snelling, Catherine 
M. Coan , Manley B. Boyce, William 0. Causer and D. Everett 
Sherman, Jr. The polls were declared closed at 7 o'clock 
P. M. with the following results. Total number of votes 
cast was 565 . 

Moderator (3 years) Donald P. Donaldson 552 

Blanks 13 

Town Clerk (1 year) William H. Davis 556 

Blanks 9 

Selectman (3 years) Elliott V. Grabill 539 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 25 

Assessor (^years) William M. Rand, Jr. 545 

Blanks 20 

Treasurer (1 year) Frederick B. Taylor 549 

Blanks 16 



26 



ELECTIONS 



Auditor (1 year) Louis C. Farley, Jr. 545 

Blanks 20 

School Committee Elizabeth C. Donaldson 345 

(3 years) Helen B. Gilfoy 216 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 3 

Regional District William A. Wilson 550 

School Committee Blanks 15 
(3 years) 

Water Commissioner Edward S. Taylor 546 

(3 years) Blanks 19 

Board of Health Ellen DeN. Cannon 553 

(3 years) Blanks 12 

Tree Warden (1 year) Robert Ralston 544 

Blanks 21 

Cemetery Commissioner James DeNormandie 541 

(2 years) Blanks 24 

Cemetery Commissioner Warren F. Flint 552 

(3 years) Blanks 13 

Planning Board George II. Kidder 544 

(5 years) Blanks 21 

Commissioner of William T. King 541 

Trust Funds (3 years) Blanks 24 

Director DeCordova A. Bradlee Emmons 407 
Museum (4 years) Albert C. England, Jr. 125 

Blanks 33 

William II. Davis, Town Clerk 



27 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
May 6, 1957 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was called 
to order by the Moderator at 7:30 P. M. The return of the 
Warrant was read and Reverend McLaughlin gave the Invocation 
to the Deity. The following business was transacted: 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate $450.00 for the replacement of the fire alarm 
whistle, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $450.00 to replace the fire alarm whistle. 

At this point, Mr. F. Winchester Denio, Chairman of the 
Finance Committee, asked that the two following articles be 
held over while he stated the financial condition of the 
Town, at the conclusion of which he was given a hearty round 
of applause. 

Article 2, To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate from taxation, borrowing, available funds, or 
any combination of these, a sufficient sum of money to 
erect and equip an elementary school plant on the site 
acquired by vote of the Town under Article 7 of the Special 
Meeting on December 18, 1956, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Voted: (Yes: 231; No. 15) That the sum of $530,000 
be raised and appropriated for the purpose of constructing 
and originally equipping and furnishing a new elementary 
school on the site acquired pursuant to vote of the Town 
under Article 7 of the Special Meeting on December 18th, 
1956, and, to meet said appropriation, that the sum of 
$5,000 be raised and appropriated from taxation and that 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and 
hereby is, authorized to borrow the sum of $525,000, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; $400,000 of the 
loan hereby authorized to be under the authority of and in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 645 of the Acts 
of 1948, as amended, and $125,000 of the said loan to be 
under the authority of and in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 44, General Laws; and that the Committee appointed 
by the Moderator in accordance with the vote of the Town 
under Article 25 at the adjourned Annual Meeting on March 
21, 1956, is hereby continued and is hereby authorized and 
empowered to enter into contracts and to do all things 
necessary to construct and equip and furnish said new elemen- 
tary school, and if a vacancy should occur on said Committee, 
the Moderator is hereby authorized to fill such vacancy. 



28 






TOWN MEETINGS 



Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate from taxation, borrowing, available funds, or 
any combination of the foregoing, a sum of money sufficient 
to construct, equip and furnish, a combined police and fire 
station on the site acquired by the Town for such building 
pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 5 at the 
special Meeting on December 18th, 1956, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Voted; (Yes: 221; No: 22) That the sum of $100,000 
be raised and appropriated for the purpose of constructing, 
equipping and furnishing, a combined Police and Fire Sta- 
tion on the site acquired by the Town for such building 
pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 5 at the 
Special Meeting on December 18, 1956; that to meet said 
appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Se- 
lectmen, be and hereby is, authorized to borrow the sum of 
$100,000 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor 
under the authority of and in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 44 of the General Laws; that the Committee ap- 
pointed by the Moderator pursuant to the vote of the Town 
under Article 24 at the Annual Meeting on March 21, 1956, 
and continued in office pursuant to the vote of the Town 
under Article 6 at the Special Meeting on December 18, 1956, 
is hereby further continued and is hereby authorized and em- 
powered to enter into contracts and to do or cause to be 
done all things necessary or desirable to construct, equip 
and furnish a combined Police and Fire Station on said site; 
and that the Moderator is hereby authorized to fill any 
vacancy which may occur on said Committee. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to repair the roof and replace 
shingles on the Town Hall, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Voted : (unanimous) That the action taken by the 
Town under Article 10 at the Annual Town Meeting in 1957 
be rescinded, and that the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $3,500 to repair the roof and replace shingles on 
the Town Hall. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $2,500 to be applied to Item 43, 
Article 5, of the 1957 budget, or take any action relative 
thereto . 

Voted : That the Town raise and appropriate the sura 
of $2,500 to be applied to Article 5, Item 43, of the 1957 
Budget . 



29 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to request the 
Trustees under the will of Julian de Cordova to pay over 
to the deCordova and Dana Museum and Park corporation 1007o 
of the B Trust net income for the year 1957, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Voted : (Unanimous) That the Town request the Trustees 
under the will of Julian de Cordova to pay over to the 
de Cordova and Dana Museum and Park corporation 100% of the 
B Trust net income for the year 1957. 

Meeting was adjourned at 10:15 P. M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



LICENSES 

Total number of Dog Licenses issued during the year 1957 
587, namely: 283 Male, 108 Female, 194 Spayed Female and 
2 Kennel; for which the sum of $1,272.85 has been paid to 
the Town Treasurer. 

Sporting, etc., issued during the year 1957: 80 Fishing, 
52 Hunting, 29 Sporting, 25 Minor Fishing, 15 Female Fish- 
ing, 2 Non-Resident Special Fishing, and 1 Duplicate; for 
which the sum of $611.50 has been paid to the Division of 
Fisheries &, Game. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



30 



01 



inaYice 



REPORT OF THE STATE AND TOWN AUDITORS 

The work of the State Auditor in 1957 consisted, as 
usual, of a thorough check of the Town * s financial records 
for the preceding year, 1956, and the preparation of a 
statement of the Town's financial condition at the begin- 
ning of the year 1957. 

The statutes provide that the "substance" of the State 
Auditor's report be published. In the Town Auditor's 
opinion, this substance is contained in the balance sheet 
of the Town prepared by the State Auditor, showing the con- 
dition of the Town as of April 30, 1957. A summarization 
of this Balance Sheet is published below. 

The full Auditor's report is on file with the Town 
Clerk, and is available for the examination of any interested 
citizens of the Town. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Louis C. Farley, Jr. . 

Town Auditor 



31 



FINANCE 



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32 



TREASURER 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1957 
General Water 



Total 



Cash on hand and deposit 

January 1, 1957 $ 188,896.45 $ 31,941.85 $ 220,838.30 
Receipts 1957 (See 

Accounting Officer's 

report for detail) 1.511.629.90 



40.377.82 
$1,700,526.35 $72,319.67 



1.552.007.72 
$1,772,846.02 



Payments per warrants 

1957 $1,136,934.01 

Cash balance Dec. 31, 

1957 563.592.34 42.204.21 

$1,700,526.35 $72,319.67 



Cash on hand Dec, 31, 

1957: 
In office awaiting 

deposit $ 

Harvard Trust Co., 

Concord 
First National Bank, 

Boston 
Merchants National 

Bank, Boston 
Belmont Savings Bank 
Beverley Savings Bank 
Boston Five Cents 

Savings Bank 
Brockton Savings Bank 
Brookline Savings Bank 
Cambridge Savings Bank 
Charlestown Savings Bank 
Home Savings Bank 
Institution for Savings 

in Roxbury 
Lowell Institution for 

Savings 
Lynn Five Cents Savings 

Bank 
Maiden Savings Bank 
Natick Five Cents 

Savings Bank 
Newton Savings Bank 
North Avenue Savings Bank 
Provident Institution for 

Savings 
Suffolk-Franklin Savings 

Bank 
Waltham Savings Bank 
Warren Institution for 

Savings 
Whitman Savings Bank 
Concord Co-operative Bank 



$30,115.46 $1,167,049.47 



605.796.55 



3,975.76 $ 

96,292.29 42,204.21 

708.82 

13,590.32 
4,847.02 
5,153.98 

4,788.65 
5,296.52 
2,668.16 
5,722.41 
5,936.39 
5,402.82 

5,322.96 

2,570.80 

5,344.92 
2,650.23 

3,569.59 
5,402.96 
2,767.70 

5,418.19 

5,463.94 
3,255.99 

7,787.63 
5,533.00 
6,000.00 



$1,772,846.02 

$ 3,975.76 

138,496.50 

708.82 

13,590.32 
4,847.02 
5,153.98 

4,788.65 
5,296.52 
2,668.16 
5,722.41 
5,936.39 
5,402.82 

5,322.96 

2,570.80 

5,344.92 
2,650.23 

3,569.59 
5,402.96 
2,767.70 

5,418.19 

5,463.94 
3,255.99 

7,787.63 
5,533.00 
6,000.00 



33 



FINANCE 



General Water Total 

U. S. Treasury bills, 

at cost: 
$100,000.00 due 

January 30, 1958 $ 99,696.67 - $ 99,696.67 

$ 50,000.00 due 

February 13, 1958 49,692.79 - 49,692.79 

$100,000.00 due 

February 27, 1958 99,457.50 - 99,457.50 

$100,000.00 due 

March 20, 195£ 



$563,592.34 $42,204.21 $605,796.55 



Frederick B. Taylor, Town Treasurer 



34 



TREASURER 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 

$110,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $10,000 each 

December 1, 1958 - 1968, issued under Chapter 208, 
Acts of 1948. 

45,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $5,000 December 
1, 1958, and $4,000 each December 1, 1959 - 1968, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as amended. 

4,000 Highway Equipment Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due 

December 1, 1958, issued under Chapter 44, General 
Laws as amended. 

172,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $13,000 each 

December 1, 1958 - 1961, and $12,000 each December 
1, 1962 - 1971, issued under Chapter 356, Acts of 
1951. 

56,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 each 

December 1, 1958 - 1971, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws as amended. 

100,000 Police and Fire Station Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 

each, October 1, 1958 - 1977, issued under Chapter 
44, General Laws as amended. 

400,000 School Project Loan, 3.60%, due $20,000 each 

October 1, 1958 - 1977, issued under Acts of 1948. 

75,000 School Construction Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 each 
October 1, 1958 - 1972, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws as amended. 

45,000 Water Main Loan, 2.70%, due $5,000 each October 1, 
1958 - 1966, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 
as amended. 



$1,007,000 



50,000 School Construction Bonds, authorized but not 
issued . 



3 5 



FINANCE 



CEMETERY INVESTMENT FUND 
Cash Account 



Sale of cemetery lots in 1957 $ 873.00 

Interest on Investment Fund savings account 369.73 
Repayment to Cemetery Investment Fund from 

General Funds of advance made in error in 

prior year 136.99 

Withdrawn from savings bank account 410 .00 

$ 1,789.72 

Paid to Town of Lincoln, per appropriation $1,000.00 
Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 369.73 
Deposited in savings bank 418.00 1.787.73 

Cash balance at December 31, 1957 $ 1 .99 



Middlesex Institution for Savings J^^OS^^S 



36 



TREASURER 
' PERPETUAL CA 







Income 


1956 










Accumu- 


Care 






Funds deposited in 




lated 


Paid 




December 


Middlesex Institu- 




Before 


in 


1957 


31, 1957 


tion for Savings Pr 


incipal 
300.00 


1957 


1957 
$ 8.50 


Income 
$ 10.83 


Balance 


Samuel Hartwell $ 


$ 53*09 


$ 355.42 


Orila J. Flint 


300.00 


43.88 


8.50 


10.56 


345.94 


Annie A. Ray 


300.00 


121.56 


8.50 


13.01 


426.07 


Maria L. Thompson 


500.00 


163.91 


8.50 


20.64 


676.05 


John H. Pierce 


500.00 


59.55 


8.50 


17.35 


568.40 


George F. Harrington 


100.00 


17.94 


- 


3.69 


121.63 


Francis Flint 


250.00 


121.33 


8.50 


11.41 


374.24 


William W. Benjamin 


500.00 


218.26 


8.50 


22.34 


732.10 


Abijah Jones 


300.00 


37.70 


8.50 


10.37 


339.57 


Ellen F. Whitney 


100.00 


16.31 


- 


3.66 


119.97 


E. H. Rogers 


250.00 


35.92 


8.50 


8.73 


286.15 


Ellen T. Trask 


200.00 


92.98 


5.00 


9.06 


297.04 


Thomas Huddleston 


200.00 


25.77 


4.25 


6.96 


228.48 


Joa Pacewicz 


400.00 


35.62 


10.00 


13.40 


439.02 


Mary Susan Rice 


87.27 


24.89 


- 


3.52 


115.68 


Julia A. Bemis 


300.00 


30.43 


15.00 


9.93 


325.36 


Donald Gordon 


300.00 


167.53 


9.20 


14.43 


472.76 


Elizabeth G. Chapin 


300.00 


98.12 


- 


12.54 


410.66 


Sarah J. Browning 


200.00 


26.43 


17.75 


6.55 


215.23 


Agnes S. Brown 


300.00 


55.08 


6.00 


10.99 


360.07 


Lewis W. Woodworth 


150.00 


21.42 


- 


5.38 


176.80 


Robert B. Chapin 


300.00 


43.24 


7.00 


10.58 


346.82 


Gardner Moore 


300.00 


40.49 


8.00 


10.46 


342.95 


Mary James Scripture 


500.00 


69.90 


10.00 


17.62 


577.52 


Charles P. Farnsworth 


350.00 


47.36 


32.60 


11.47 


376.23 


Helen O. Storrow 2 


,000.00 


325.92 


10.50 


72.92 


2,388.34 


Elizabeth S. Wheeler 


200.00 


35.25 


4.50 


7.25 


238.00 


L. B. L A. E. 












Th lessen 


500.00 


91.13 


m 


18.62 


609.75 


Paul Dorian 


150.00 


24.76 


- 


5.49 


180.25 


Raymond E. Hagerty 


150.00 


24.76 


- 


5.49 


180.25 


Charles O. Preble 


100.00 


14.56 


- 


3.60 


118.16 


George G. Tarbell 


400.00 


33.08 


12.00 


13.26 


434.34 


Eugene Sherman 


200.00 


10.94 


- 


6.63 


217.57 


Mildred E. Bowles 


200.00 


7.71 


. 


6.52 


214.23 


Mabel H. Todd 


200.00 


5.53 


- 


6.46 


211.99 


John J. Kelliher 


200.00 


4.02 


• 


6.42 


210.44 


Lena M. Newell 


325.00 


- 


- 


- 


325.00 



Suffolk Savings Bank 

J. Waldo Smith 
Charles S. Smith 
Edward R. Farrar 
Anne D. Pollard 



300.00 
300.00 
300.00 
300.00 



45.52 


6.00 


10.68 


350.20 


49.69 


7.00 


10.77 


353.46 


33.40 


8.50 


10.21 


335.11 


33.07 


8.00 


10.23 


335.30 



$13,112.27 2,408.05 257.80 470.03 15,732.55 
Frederick B. Taylor, Town Treasurer 



37 



FINANCE 



REPORT OF THE ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



A report of receipts and expenditures for the year ending 
December 31, 1957, with a balance sheet showing the financial con- 
dition of the Town. 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 
January 1, 1958 



Real and Personal 

Valuation 1955 less abatements $ 6,180,265.00 

Valuation 1956 less abatements 6,535,620.00 

Valuation 1957 less abatements 7,152,215.00 

Motor Vehicle 

Valuation 1955 less abatements 1,011,775.00 

Valuation 1956 less abatements 1,119,768.00 

Valuation 1957 less abatements 1.119. 648 .00 



$ 23,119,291.00 



Average Valuation $7,706,430.00 

5% Legal Borrowing Capacity 385,321.00 



FUNDED DEBT 

General, Inside Limit $ 280,000.00 

Outside Limit 682,000.00 

Enterprise, Water 45.000.00 

TOTAL FUNDED DEBT 1/1/58 $ 1,007,000.00 

AVAILABLE BORROWING CAPACITY 1/1/58 $ 105,321.00 

AUTHORIZED BUT UNISSUED (School) $ 50,000.00 



38 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



GENERAL REVENUE 



Current Year 
Polls 
Personal 
Real Estate 



Prior Years 
Polls 
Personal 
Real Estate 



In lieu of taxes (City of Cambridge) 

From the State 
Income Tax 
Corporation Tax 
Meals Tax 
Re-imb. Loss of Taxes 



Permits 

Building 
Plumbing 
Wiring 



Fines 

Court 

Grants and Gifts 

School Construction 
Transportation 



From Federal Grants 

Disability Assistance 

Administration 

Assistance 
Aid to Dependent Children 

Administration 

Assistance 
Old Age Assistance 

Administration 

Assistance 

School Aid (Public Law 874) 

From County 

Dog Licenses 
Care L Killing 



$ 1,816.00 
36,672.06 



16.00 

222.70 

7.339.76 



41,050.88 

20,650.00 

715.28 

645 .23 



1,244.50 
647.00 
451.00 



10,516.91 
17.294.55 



$481,761.06 



7,578.46 
1,103.71 



63,061.39 



2,342.50 



137.70 



27,811.46 



29.27 
333.00 




50.80 
146.40 




688.44 
9.850.37 


11,098.28 
6,662.04 


941.22 
65.00 


1,006.22 



39 



FINANCE 



COMMERCIAL REVENUE 



Pri vi leges 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Levy of 1057 

Prior years 
Farm Excise 



$ 56,852.78 

17,995.92 

170.29 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



$ 75,018.99 



Selectmen 

Sale of By-Laws, naps, etc 



82.25 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Re-imburseraent for fire calls 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Board of Appeals 



246.54 

37.00 

108.00 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Health 

Dog Inoculations 
Nurses fees 
Garbage collections 



HIGHWAYS 



115.00 

223.25 

4.602.75 



391.54 



4,941.00 



Chapter 90 Construction 

State Aid 
Chapter 90 Maintenance 

State Aid 

County Aid 
Snow Removal, State 



6,500.00 

5,054.37 

3,273.72 

258.00 



15,086.09 



PUBLIC WELFARE 



Disability Assistance 
Reimbursement, State 

Aid to Dependent Children 
Reimbursement, State 

Old Age Assistance 

Reimbursement, State 
Cities and Towns 



606.62 

138.51 

9,940.31 
510.92 



11,196.36 



Veterans 

Paraplegic Veterans, State 



278.80 



40 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



SCHOOL AND LIBRARY 



Tuition 

State Wards, State 

Vocational Education, State 

Sale of books and rent of gym 

Milk Fund 

Library Fines 



247.60 
913.99 
735.64 
240.00 
4,716.81 
547.80 



$ 7,401.84 



UNCLASSIFIED 



DeCordova re-iraburseraent for 
State Audit 



150.00 



RECREATION 



Swimming program 
Recreation prizes 



526.05 
9.00 



535.05 



CEMETERIES 



Interments 
Foundations 



Interest on Taxes 

Savings Accounts 

U. S. Government Bonds 





472.00 
5.30 




477.30 


INTEREST 


382.23 
3,141.94 
3.205.21 










6 


,729.38 



AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 



Agency 

Dog Licenses 
John H. Pierce Fund 
Cemetery Investment Fund 
Grammar School Fund 
DeCordova School Equipment Fund 
Old Age Assistance Recoveries 
Tailings 



1,272.85 

181.00 

863 
42 

711 
3,476 

440 



01 
85 
84 
39 
20 



6,988.14 



REFUNDS 



General Departments 
School Construction 
Estimated Receipts 
Accrued Interest 
Cash advances returned 



464.87 

1, 190.00 

431.22 

345.00 

65.00 



2,496.09 



41 



FINANCE 



LOANS 



Temporary Loans 

School Loan 

Police and Fire Building Loan 

Premium on Loans 



$200,000.00 

475,000.00 

100,000.00 

2.294.25 



$777,294.25 



Total Cash Receipts 

Cash Balance January 1, 1957 



1,511,629.90 
188.896.45 



WATER REVENUE 



$1,700,526.35 



Water Rates 
Water Connections 
Hydrant Rentals 



34,989.56 
1,893.26 
3.495.00 



Total Water Department Receipts 
Cash Balance January 1, 1957 



40,377.82 
31.941.85 * 



$ 72,319.67 



* $7,500 reserved for Water Meter 
Replacement 



42 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



EXPENDITURES 
PAYMENTS ON SELECTMEN'S WARRANTS 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 

Treasurer 

Collector 

Town Clerk 

Assessors 

Auditor 

Legal 

Election and Registration 

Town Hall 

Planning Board 

Finance Committee 



8,266.23 
2,044.68 
2,392.88 

498.71 

2,221.79 

50.00 

498.49 

728.89 
18,099.46 

125.37 



15.00 



$34,941.50 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Police 

Fire Department 

Fire and Police Station 

Moth Department 

Tree Warden 

Board of Appeals 

Inspectors of Buildings 

Plumbing and Wiring 
Civilian Defense 
Communications 
Printing Building Code 



26,238.74 

34,023.27 

51,515.26 

4,276.17 

1,734.55 

266.03 

1,301.45 

268.91 

17,459.08 

265.41 



137,348.87 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Board of Health 

Inspector of Animals 

Rent and Maintenance of Dump 

Mosquito Control 

Poison Ivy Control 



HIGHWAYS 



9,230.75 

100.00 

1,732.16 

6,500.00 

794.63 



18,357.54 



Chapter 90 Maintenance 
Chapter 90 Construction 
General Highways 
Street Lights 
Virginia Road 
Equipment 



4,493.95 
16,144.14 
43,567.96 

6,443.41 

232.30 

19.424.07 



90,305.83 



43 



FINANCE 



PUBLIC WELFARE 



Aid to Citizens $29,033.17 

Administration 1 . 539 .25 



Library 7,705.83 

Library Building Committee 1.500.00 



$30,572.42 



SCHOOLS 

Elementary School 247,816.09 

Elementary School Construction 115,835.75 

Elementary School Land 29 . 500 . 00 

393, 151.84 

Regional High School 121,235.80 

LIBRARY 



9,205.83 



RECREATION 

Recreation 3,426.13 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Middlesex County Retirement 3,115.99 
Employee Insurance and 

Hospital Fund 3,505.66 

Property Insurance 8,492.56 

Town Reports 1,254.86 

Preservation of Town Records 10.06 

Memorial Day 195.65 

4th of July Celebration 1,200.00 

Acquisition of Public Land Committee 161.23 

Capital Requirements Committee 137 .20 

18,073.21 

CEMETERY 

Cemetery 2,201.02 

TOWN DEBT SERVICE 

Bond Payment 36,000.00 

Interest on Bonds and Tax Notes 9 .481 .50 

45,481.50 

REFUNDS 

Refunds on taxes 4,172.84 



44 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 



Dog Licenses due County 

Milk Fund 

Repayment of Temporary Loan 

Premium on Loan 

State Parks and Reservations 

State Audit 

County Tax 

County Hospital Assessment 



tax 



$ 1,259.70 

4,249.06 

200,000.00 

1,851.04 

1, 177.51 

884.70 

16,080.61 

2.957.06 



$228,459.68 



Total Expenditures 

Cash Balance December 31, 1957 



1, 136,934.01 



WATER 



$1,700,526.35 



Operating 

Water Main Brooks Road 

Bonds and Interest 



$21,337.49 
1,889.22 
6.888.75 



Total Expenditures 

Balance in Bank December 31, 1957 



30, 115.46 
42.204.21 



$ 72,319.67 



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55 



FINANCE 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Balance Sheet - December 31, 1957 

General Accounts 

ASSETS 

Cash : 

General, $563,592.34 

Water, 42,204.21 



Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes : 

Levy of 1956: 

Personal Property, $ 163.00 
Real Estate, 1,015.50 

Levy of 1957: 

Poll, $ 2.00 

Personal Property, 122.40 

Real Estate, 7,461.60 



Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise: 

Levy of 1956, $ 523.66 

Levy of 1957, 9,210.35 



$605,796.55 



8,764.50 



9,734.01 



Farm Animal Excise: 

Levy of 1957, 23.75 

Water: 

Rates 1956, $ 49.60 

Rates 1957, 1,928.36 

Miscellaneous charges, 186.41 

2, 164.37 

Aid to Highways: 

State, $ 1,500.00 

County, 4,750.00 

6,250.00 

Loan Authorized: 

School Construction, 50,000.00 

Underestimates 1957: 

State Parks Assessment, $ 54.12 

County Tax, 1,400.87 

1,454.99 



$684,188.17 



56 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Proceeds of Dog Licenses - Due County, 

Tailings - Unclaimed Checks, 

Trust Fund Income: 

John H. Pierce Hospital and 

Park Fund, $ 

Julian DeCordova School Equipment 

Fund, 
Grammar School Fund, 



Premium on Loans: 

Police and Fire Station Loan, 
School Loan, 



Accrued Interest on Loans : 

Police and Fire Station Loan, 
School Loan, 



Old Age Assistance Recoveries 

Federal Grants: 

Disability Assistance: 

Administration , 

Assistance , 
Aid to Dependent Children: 

Administration , 

Aid, 
Old Age Assistance: 

Administration , 

Assistance , 



School (Public Law 874) 



School Milk Fund, 

Appropriation Balances: 
Revenue : 

General 
Non-Revenue (Loan Balances): 
Police and Fire Station 

Construction , 
School Construction, 
Water Mains. 



Loan Authorized and Unissued, 

Overestimate 1957: 

County Hospital Assessment, 



181.00 

711.84 
42.85 



366. 13 
77.08 



285.00 
60.00 



$ 40.12 
236.92 

$ 46.99 
384.88 

$ 145.80 
1,779.49 

$ 6,662.04 



$ 11,894.40 



52,978.93 

374,266.06 

1.401.92 



31.75 
440.20 



935.69 

443.21 

345.00 
3,724.84 



9,296.24 
535.07 



440,541.31 
50,000.00 

906.73 



57 



FINANCE 



Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus, $ 15,733.44 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 

Levy of 1956, $1,178.50 

Levy of 1957, 2,012.71 



3, 191.21 



Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise, $ 9,734.01 

Farm Animal Excise, 23.75 

Water, 2,164.37 

Aid to Highways, 6,250.00 



Surplus Revenue: 

General, $99,089.06 

Water, 40,802.29 



18,172.13 

139.891.35 
$684,188.17 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Funded or Fixed Debt 
Inside Debt Limit: 

General, $180,000.00 

Outside Debt Limit: 

General, $782,000.00 



Water, 45,000.00 



Serial Loans: 

Inside Debt Limit: 
General : 

Highway Building, 4,000.00 

School, 176,000.00 

Outside Debt Limit: 
General : 

Police and Fire Station, 100,000.00 
School, 682,000.00 

Water: 

Mains, 45,000.00 



827.000.00 
$1,007,000.00 



180,000.00 



827.000.00 
$1,007,000.00 



Respectfully submitted: 

Elizabeth Causer, Accounting Officer 



58 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



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39 



FINANCE 

ASSESSORS' RErORT 

The Board of Assessors submits the following report for the 
year 1957: 

According to law, all real estate and personal property tax 
abatement requests must be filed with the Board on or before 
October 1 of the year in question. 

All automobile excise tax abatement requests must be filed 
with the Board within six months of the date of issuance of the 
notice of assessment or of the date of sale or transfer of the 
vehicle, but in any event not later than January 31 of the 
succeeding year. However, if the bill or notice is first sent 
after January 1 of the succeeding year, the abatement request 
must be filed on or before the thirtieth day after the date on 
which the bill or notice is sent. No abatement may reduce the 
excise collected to less than $2.00. 

1957 Recapitulation 

Total appropriations to be raised from taxation $697,360.02 
Appropriations to be taken from available funds 130,237.95 

State Tax and Assessments 

State Parks & Reservations $ 1,123.39 
Underestimate for 1956 358.78 

State Audit 884.70 2,366.87 

County Tax and Assessments 

County Tax $ 14,679.74 
T. B. Hospital assessment 3,863.79 

Underestimates for 1956 1.228.52 19,772.05 

Overlay of current year 8.778 .93 

Gross Amount to be raised $858,515.82 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 

Income tax $ 43,045.41 

Corporation taxes 17,495.60- 

Motor Vehicle L Trailer Excise 55,328.39 

Old Age Assistance 15,284.46 

Schools 27,203.62 

Water Department 48,888.50 

Interest on Taxes L Assessments 3,823.65 
State Assistance for School 

Construction 10,516.91 

All others 11.756.49 

$233,343.03 

Appropriations voted to be taken 

from available funds 130.237.95 

Total Estimated Receipts and Available Funds $363,580.98 

Net amount to be raised by taxation on polls 

and property 494.934.84 

$858,515.82 

60 



ASSESSORS 



Number of polls 1014 at $2.00 $2,028.00 

Total valuation; 

Personal Property $541,245 at $68.00 36,804.66 

Real Estate $7,248,630 at $68.00 456. 102.18 

$494,934.84 

Number of acres of land assessed: 8,143.40 

Number of dwelling houses assessed: 943 

Tax Rate per $1,000.00 $68.00 



Respectfully submitted: 

Frederick II. Greene, Jr., Chairman 
Elmer H. Ziegler 
William II. Rand, Jr. 

Board of Assessors 



61 



Protection of 
Persons ana Property 

REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I hereby submit ray report for the Police Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1957. 

Arrests by Lincoln Police 67 

Arrests by State Police 41 

Warning notices issued for violation 

of motor vehicle law 107 

Violations of motor vehicle law 

reported to Registry of Motor 

Vehicles 40 

Motor Vehicle accident report: 

Accidents reported 127 

Occupants injured 108 

Occupants killed 1 

It should be noted that there was one less arrest made 
by this Department in 1957 for Juvenile Delinquency than 
there was in 1956. I consider this noteworthy in view of 
the increase in such arrests in other localities. Arrests 
for other offenses were generally about the same as in 1956 
Considerably more time was spent on traffic enforcement in 
1957 with the resulting increase of warning notices issued. 
There will be even more time put into this work in 1958 in 
an effort to reduce speed throughout the town. 

In my 1956 report I requested the Selectmen to appoint 
another full time officer to the department and to appoint 
a Sergeant on the department. In accordance with these 
requests, the Selectmen, in April, appointed Frank W. 
•Gordon, Jr. to the department as a patrolman, and Patrolman 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. was promoted to Sergeant. 

On July 20, 1957, Patrolman James H. Diamond, while on 
duty, suffered a heart attack, and on July 21, 1957, at the 
Emerson Hospital in Concord, he died. Jim, who was 58 
years old, had served the Town of Lincoln since 1934, 18 
years as a Special Police Officer and 5 years as a regular. 
Jim was a devoted and faithful servant of the Town and is 
greatly missed by this department. He was particularly 

62 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 




As a result of Jim's untimely death, the department was 
again undermanned. Consequently, in October Michael J. 
McHugh was appointed to the department by the Selectmen. 

During the time we were undermanned, Joseph Cotoni 
worked regularly with us and several other special officers 
helped out, and I want to thank them all for their fine 
work and cooperation. 

In October Patrolman Gordon attended the Local Police 
Officers' Training School at the State Police Academy in 
Framingham. Patrolman McHugh will be attending this school 
in the spring. When Patrolman Gordon returned to duty, 
he and Patrolman McHugh, under Sergeant Maclnnis, took over 
the night shift. Patrolman Hallett, who, since his ap- 
pointment in 1950, has worked so diligently, was put on the 
day shift. 

In May I attended a school on Police Administration con- 
ducted by the F. B. I. at Boston. Sergeant Maclnnis has 
been attending a twenty day seminar on Juvenile Delinquency 
being conducted at the Judge Baker Guidance Center in Bos- 
ton. The department has continued its participation in 
the New England Police Revolver League. 

The Police Department has spent many hours during the 
past year checking vacant homes; checking doors and win- 
dows in places of business; investigating cases of breaking 
and entering and larcenies; investigating complaints of all 
kinds; investigating auto accidents; enforcing traffic laws; 
doing photography work; providing emergency ambulance ser- 
vice; patroling the roads at night; directing traffic at 
school crossings; making plans for, and handling of, traf- 
fic at public events; picking up stray dogs; participating 
in safety programs at the schools; serving summonses for 
other departments, and preparing cases for prosecution in 
the Courts. 

During the year the department acquired a Graflex press 
type camera. This has proved to be a most valuable piece 
of equipment, and I hope in the future to be able to do our 
own developing and printing. We also acquired a mobile 

63 



PROTECTION 



radio set which has already proved to be of tremendous 
value to us. 

The Parents' League requested us to conduct a rifle club 
for Lincoln teen-agers this year. Since September Ser- 
geant Maclnnis has been spending every other Saturday morn- 
ing with a group at the range at the Lincoln-Sudbury High 
School . 

In the early months of spring we hope to move to our 
new quarters at the Fire and Police Station at Codman and 
Lincoln Roads. We are working on a target range there 
which we hope to have well equipped and which we will make 
available to residents of the Town. 

Once again I wish to express my thanks to the operators 
of the switchboard and radio at the Town Hall. They have 
all done a good job for us. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Leo J. Algeo 

Chief of Police 



64 



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i Hi' 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Board organized electing A, J. Dougherty Chief and 
William Dean Clerk. The Department answered 132 alarms 
during the year, as listed below: 

Grass Fires 52 

House and Accessories 21 

Cars and Accidents 11 

Miscellaneous 2 9 

Fires in Trees 11 

Total estimated property loss reported to the Fire De- 
partment amounted to $16,000.00. 

The Fire Department recognizes the growing need for 
sufficient equipment and coverage to give the Town adequate 
protection, and we feel efforts being made in this direction 
should receive attention without delay. In this regard, 
we are pleased to announce receipt of a new Peter Pershe 
pump truck, last October. This latest addition to our 
Town fire-fighting equipment is a fully equipped model, 
capable of pumping 750 gallons of water per minute, and 
greatly increases the efficiency of the Department. - The 
new Fire Station is expected to be ready for occupancy 
shortly, and we are of the opinion that the new and com- 
pletely modern quarters will prove of lmmeasureable value 
in enhancing the morale of the call men. 

The general public should be educated to a realistic 
approach to "Fire Prevention". Householders can never be 
too conscious of the possibility of fire originating in 
their homes. A few simple but often neglected rules will 
greatly minimize this danger. 

1. Keep all exits clear and clean at all times. 

2. Educate your children in fire prevention and 
control . 

3. Store combustible material in a safe and 
well-aired space. 

4. Throw old, partially-filled paint and solvent 
cans in the rubbish. 

5. Repair or dispose of frayed electrical cords; 
and never over-load circuits with too many 



65 



PROTECTION 



lights or appliances. 

6. Check heating systems and chimneys every year - 
before the Winter season. 

7. Obtain a permit for all open fires from the 
Fire Department. 

3. Don't hesitate to request advice from the Fire 
Chief or his Deputy on all questionable fire 
hazards. It is far better to ask a question 
of the Chief than to ask one of your insurance 
adjustor, after your home has been demolished 
by fire. 

Upon completion of the new Fire Station, the trucks will 
be moved from Doherty's Garage, where they have been housed 
and serviced for 42 years. The garage was originally opera 
ted by Martin Corrigan and Matthew Doherty; with Mr. Doherty 
assuming sole ownership in 1937. 

Our association with Doherty's Garage has been a pleas- 
ant and memorable chapter in the history of Lincoln. The 
owners and employees of this outstanding concern have 
lavished our Fire Department with loyal and conscientious 
service over the years. It is regrettable that this close 
association must come to an end in the interest of modern 
progress . 

In appreciation of the care, service and loyalty with 
which the Department has been received and attended by this 
concern, we, the undersigned, in behalf of the citizens of 
Lincoln, extend our heart-felt thanks and best wishes. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Chief 
William M. Dean, Clerk 
Frank Gordon 

Board of Fire Engineers 



66 



TREE WARDEN 

REPORT OF THE TREE WARDEN 

With a late start and very limited help during the sum- 
mer months, we have endeavored to improve the condition of 
the trees of the town by trimming, removal of dead and 
dying trees, and thinning as necessary. Most of our time 
was spent on Lincoln Road, from the Depot to Tower Road, 
Baker Bridge Road, and Route 117 from Route 126 to the 
Concord line. Although none of these roads are wholly 
completed, we feel a very great improvement has been made. 

Fifty elm trees that were condemned during the year with 
Dutch Elm Disease were removed and burned. 

For 1958 1 hope to continue the program of trimming and 
removal along the same lines as we have started. The town 
now has equipment in good condition for this work and has 
help available for the winter months, which we feel is the 
most advantageous time to do it. 

As many of our trees along the streets are in poor con- 
dition and may soon have to be removed, I feel we should 
look forward to a program of replanting and replacing of 
shade trees in this town, as many other towns in the state 
have done and are doing. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Albert S. Brooks 

Tree Warden 



67 



PROTECTION 



CIVIL DEFENSE AGENCY 

The continued advancement in the power and scope of 
atomic weapons, long range missiles and science generally 
presents a clouded picture of just what are the best pro- 
tective measures to take in the event of an enemy attack. 
Although Lincoln is still a so-called "Evacuation Town", 
the concept of underground shelters as being the most 
practical means of protection against nuclear warfare is 
rapidly gaining favor. The Massachusetts Operational 
Survival Plan Project is now entering its final stages. 
From this study we hope to gain a better understanding of 
the best course to follow when and if the occasion arises. 
In spite of the fact that your agency has drawn up evacua- 
tion plans, it seems advisable to withhold distribution 
until more concrete plans have been formulated. 

Close contact is maintained with the Town officers, fire 
and police departments, to ascertain our needs in the event 
of a natural disaster. Under consideration is the possi- 
bility of acquiring the present small fire truck which is 
about to be retired and can be manned and equipped by 
Civil Defense. Thus, at very little expense a combination 
rescue and fire truck can continue in operation to supple- 
ment equipment of other departments. 

We hope to deliver with the Town report this year a 
booklet entitled "Home Protection Exercises". Because 
in a serious emergency each family may necessarily have to 
become a self sufficient unit until help can be given, this 
booklet should be of invaluable help in making preparation 
for such an eventuality. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Eveleth R. Todd 

Local Civil Defense Director 



68 



3£ealtk and (Welfare 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

The Board of Health was organized in 1957 as it was in 
1956 with Dr. Gordon Donaldson, Chairman; Mrs. Bradford 
Cannon, Secretary; Mrs. Marian Ober, Agent; Mr. William 
Davis, Burial Agent; Mr. Andrew Dougherty, Inspector of 
Animals; and Dr. Alden Russell, Inspector of Slaughtering. 
Mrs. Cannon resigned from the Board in December in order to 
accept an appointment on the Regional High School Committee. 
Mrs. Robert Bygrave was appointed to fill the vacancy on 
the Board of Health. 

The following licenses were issued during 1957: Over- 
night Cabins, 1; Slaughtering of Poultry, 1; Piggeries, 2; 
Sale of Alcohol, 7; Garbage transportation, 3. The fol- 
lowing communicable diseases were reported as required by 
law: German measles, 3; Chicken pox, 19; Mumps, 47; Dog 
bites, 17; Scarlet fever, 5; Salmonellosis, 4; Racoon bite, 
1; Rat bite, 1. Routine inspections were made of piggeries 
restaurants, and overnight cabins. 

Two hundred thirty dogs were innoculated for rabies at 
the Annual Dog Clinic held at the Town Barn in May. Dr. 
Alden Russell served as Veterinarian as usual. 

The Well Child Conference continues to be held on the 
third Thursday of every month under the direction of Dr. 
John Davies assisted by Mrs. Ober. The Board would like 
to express its appreciation to the group of faithful volun- 
teers who help to make this conference run so smoothly. 
Examined by Dr. Davies were: 22 babies; 79 repeaters, and 
79 kindergarten children. Free polio vaccine has been 
administered to the children and will continue to be avail- 
able for any child becoming eligible. 

Dr. David Farrell resigned from the Dental Clinic in 
April to devote full time to private practice and has been 
succeeded by Dr. James Howard Oaks who comes to Lincoln 
weekly . 

All town employees were innoculated by Dr. John Sisson 
for Asian Flu. Three Polio Clinics were held this year, 
the last of which was held on May 25th and brought to an 
end the Polio Program in Lincoln. All children between 
the ages of 6 months and 19 years and pregnant women were 



69 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



given the opportunity to receive the vaccine; and with a 
very few exceptions, all the persons in this group have 
availed themselves of this opportunity or have received 
shots from their own physicians. Since July l f 1957, free 
vaccine has been available for infants and pregnant women 
only . 

The Board would also like to express its appreciation 
to the Lincoln nurses, volunteers, and doctors who contri- 
buted so generously of their time and knowledge to all the 
Polio Clinics. 

Garbage collection continues for approximately 325 sub- 
scribers. The charge is $7.50 semi-annually, payable to 
the Town . 

No land subdivisions have come before the Board this 
year. The Board has further investigated the question of 
fluoridation of the public water supply as a means of re- 
ducing dental cavitation; and have recently appointed a 
committee to study all aspects of the problem as it affects 
Lincoln. Their report should be available in the Fall, 
and its contents will be presented to the Town. 

The Board has had the services of an expert sanitary 
engineer once a week for the past year. With the new 
building code now in effect, the cost to the Town of any 
sanitary inspection will be included in the building permit 
fee. In the future all plumbing and sanitary inspections 
are to be carried out by a single inspector. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Lucy E. Bygrave 

Walter Hill 

Gordon Donaldson, M.D. , Chairman 

Board of Health 



70 



NURSING COMMITTEE 



REPORT OF THE LINCOLN NURSING COMMITTEE 

1957 

The Lincoln Nursing Committee held five regular meetings 
with Mrs. Ober during 1957. In addition, its members have 
assisted at the Well-Child Conference each month, as did 
other volunteer helpers in the town. Likewise, volunteer 
assistance was given at the Polio Clinics in January and 
May. The bookkeeping for the Dental Service was done by 
the Nursing Committee again this year. Policies pertain- 
ing to billing, as described in the last annual report, 
have worked very successfully. 

Mrs. Barbara Woods served the town in July when Mrs. 
Ober was ill and also substituted during her vacation in 
August . 

The Nursing Committee has assisted Mrs. Ober in the 
State-required eye and ear testing of school children. It 
has also helped the school physician with the physical ex- 
aminations required by the State for the 3rd and 6th grades 
We have urged parents to have these examinations done by 
their own physicians, as recommended by the State. There 
has been some discussion about improving health education 
and services at the schools. In this connection we have 
worked with the Physical Education Department with regard 
to shower-room practices. 

In an effort to be informed and plan for the nursing 
program in a growing community the committee has been 
familiarizing itself with neighboring health agencies. 
This included meetings with the President of the Concord 
Family Service Society and with the Agent of the Nashoba 
Welfare District serving Acton, Carlisle and Bedford. 

The Committee would like to express its gratitude to 
those who have given generously of their time at the Well- 
Child Conferences, at the Polio Clinics and in the testing 
programs . 

1957 Summary 

Medical 423 

Surgical 38 

Pre-natal 28 

Post-natal 20 



71 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



Child Welfare 416 

Social Welfare 92 

Board of Health 58 
Well-Child Conference and 

Dental Clinic 61 
Trips out of town 

(hospitals, conferences, 

etc. ) 96 

Total number of calls 1232 



Respectfully submitted; 

Ellen DeN. Cannon, Chairman 

Elizabeth Donaldson 

Louise H. McClennen, Secretary 



72 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
1957 

The following animals have been inspected: 

Cows, 2 years and over 122 

Heifers, 1 to 2 years 38 

Heifers, under 1 year 39 

Dulls 5 

Steers 25 

Ho r s e s 47 

Sheep 76 

Swine 629 

All animals are under the rules and regulations of the 
Division of Livestock Disease Control. 

The Division of Livestock has been given a list of the 
owners and the number and kind of animals in the Town, 

During the year eighteen dog bites were reported. Also 
during the past year the cattle, horses and swine have not 
been threatened with any epidemic. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Andrew J. Dougherty 

Inspector of Animals 



73 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

The local Board of Public Welfare is responsible for the ad- 
ministration of four categories of assistance, namely, Old Age 
Assistance, Aid to Dependent Children, Disability Assistance and 
General Relief. 

Aid was given to 27 recipients under the Old Age Assistance 
program in 1957. 

Payments : 

From Town Funds $17,479.03 

From Federal Funds 10.397.71 

$27,876.74 

Receipts : 

Balance from 1956 $ 1,707.03 

Recoveries 619.80 

U. S. Government • 9,850.37 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 9,940.31 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Meals Tax 715.28 

Other Cities and Towns 510.92 

$23,343.71 
Cost to the Town of Lincoln 6.312.52 

$29,656.23 
Balance reserved for O.A.A. 1. 779.49 

$27,876.74 



One family was aided under Aid to Dependent Children program 
in 1957. 

Payments : 

From Federal Funds $ 138.60 

Receipts : 

Balance from 1956 $ 377.08 

U. S. Government 146.40 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 138 . 5 1 

$ 661.99 

Cost to the Town of Lincoln 

Balance reserved for Aid to 

Dependent Children $ 384.88 



One recipient was aided under the Disability Assistance pro- 
gram in 1957. 

Payments : 

From Town Funds $ 490.86 

From Federal Funds 496 .86 

$ 987.72 

Receipts : 

Balance from 1956 $ 400.78 

U. S. Government 333.00 

74 



PUBLIC ASSISTANCE AGENT 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 606.62 

1,340.40 
Cost to the Town of Lincoln 

Balance Reserved for Disability 

Assistance $ 236.92 



General Relief $ 30.11 



Respectfully submitted: 
Elizabeth Causer, Agent 



75 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 

MOSQUITO CONTROL IN LINCOLN 
Report 1957 



Mosquito control followed the usual program in Lincoln. 
Ditch cleaning was started in the south end of the swamp 
between Conant Road and Winter Street but work had to halt 
because of too much snow and ice. Drainage work resumed 
here in November and is nearing completion. 

Mid winter dusting was done with knapsack sprayers in 
most of the small swamps during February and March. Most 
of the remaining swamps were sprayed by helicopter in April 
after the mosquito larvae hatched. A few localities had 
to be sprayed in June to reduce adult mosquitoes where 
larvae escaped the April spray. 

When the house mosquito season commenced in June all 
the catch basins were sprayed once with Dildrin emulsion. 
Basin spraying was not repeated. Other house mosquito 
sources were so few during the summer that practically no 
spraying was done. 

No spraying or dusting was required on the Sudbury 
River swamplands or meadows. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Budget Planning 

Balance on hand, Dec. 29, 1956 $3,277.00 

Expenditures Jan. through 

April, 1957 $2,896.09 

1957 appropriation received 

June 22nd - 6,500.00 
Expenditure May through Dec. 3.780.41 

Balance at end of Dec. 1957 $3,100.50 

Estimated expenditure Jan. through 

April, 1958 - 2.930.00 

Anticipated balance at end 



of April, 1958 - $ 170.50 

Budget estimate May 1958 to May, 

1959 - $5,900.00 



76 



MOSQUITO CONTROL 



EXPENDITURES CLASSIFIED FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1957 



Labor $4,307.70 

Insecticide 468.71 

Aircraft service 588.00 

Other service (trucking) 18.00 

Special materials 13.60 

Rent 46.15 

Office operation &. supervision 553.37 
Field* operation , supervision, 

etc. 680.95 

$6,676.48 

The Commission has requested an appropriation of 
$6,000.00 in 1958. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Robert L. Armstrong 

Superintendent 



77 



JrlannLnq 
ana JrubLLc (jYorlcs 



REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD 

The Planning Board was organized at its first meet- 
ing with Alan McClennen, chairman, Katharine S. White, 
clerk. The Board immediately resolved to write to Mr. A. 
T. Howard, the most recent former member, expressing their 
appreciation for his contributions to the town during his 
five years on the Planning Board. 

Subdivisions 

The work in this connection continued light. Three 
or four projects have been in the preliminary stages but 
thus far none have progressed to the definitive plan stage. 

Route 2 Re-Location 

Following the work of last year the Board has con- 
tinued to confer with the DPW, the Selectmen and individuals 
in order to resolve the confusion which now exists, because 
the DPW has not seen fit to notify the Town which route it 
will establish and when it will initiate takings. In the 
report of 1956 it was proposed by the Planning Board to 
run route 2 between routes 2 and 2A. Reappraisal of this 
situation in the light of new construction on Bedford Road, 
Sunnyside Lane and Brooks Road has led the Board to the 
opinion that this route is no longer feasible. 



The 


impossible 


limited ac 


cord line. 


route nort 


has stated 


of the Tow 


tion of th 


to our unt 


Department 


potential 


of the pon 


route woul 


ford Road 


often by c 


Sandy Pond 


either dev 


Pond Reser 



Department of Publ 
for them to impro 
cess standards bet 
Also the Depart 
herly near the Bed 
that such a route 
n. The Board has 
e road close to Sa 
reated water suppl 
's tentative locat 
of some excellent 
d and a little way 
d preclude the con 
to Sandy Pond Road 
onsultants to the 

Road the route wo 
elopment for resid 
vation as called f 



ic Works has st 
ve the present 
ween Bedford Ro 
ment is unwilli 
ford Airport al 

would be in th 

most strongly 
ndy Pond. The 
y is obvious, 
ion would spoil 
residential sit 

from it. So 
struction of a 

as has been re 
board. On the 
uld also spoil 
ence or expansi 
or by the recen 



ated that i 
route 2 to 
ad and the 
ng to carry 
though the 
e best inte 
opposed the 
potential 
Further th 
the develo 
es to the n 
also such a 
road from B 
commended s 

west side 
good land f 
on of Walde 
t report to 



t is 

Con- 

the 
Board 
rests 

loca- 
hazard 
e 

pment 
orth 

ed- 
o 

of 
or 

n 
the 



78 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Department of Natural Resources. (The Board has not had 
an opportunity to review this report). 

The final recommendation of the Board which was 
transmitted to the Selectmen called for a road following 
the present alignment of Route 2 to about the location of 
the Northeastern Gas Transmission line easterly of Bedford 
Road, thence through the low point of Bedford Road south 
of Route 2, thence generally parallel to Route 2, merging 
again with Route 2 near Sandy Pond Road. The matter of 
access to the town from Route 2 at Lexington Road has been 
discussed with the DPW but no conclusion has been reached 
as yet. 

Planning Study 

Following from the report of last year the Board 
submitted a request for appropriation by the Town of $2,000 
for consultant services for an objective study of the con- 
servation of the town's amenities and of the impact of 
changed residential zoning requirements, the introduction 
of non-residential land uses and other programs which would, 
on the one hand, retain the attractiveness of the Town as 
a place for living, at the same time insuring fiscal sta- 
bility for the Town. After^the appropriation of the fund, 
the Board approached five consultants, of whom three were 
willing to undertake the work. After interviews, two of 
them, Professor Charles W. Eliot and Morton B. Braun , 
agreed to join forces to review our situation. Simultan- 
eously, the Board applied to the Massachusetts Department 
of Commerce for Federal assistance which was forthcoming 
late in November. As of this time, the contracts between 
the Planning Board and the Department of Commerce, and the 
Department of Commerce and the consultants, are being 
readied for execution. The consultants, in the meantime, 
are initiating their studies. Regrettably, the delays as 
a result of obtaining matching Federal funds are such that 
the consultants' reports and recommendations will not be 
available until after the 1958 town meeting. 

Land Acquisition 

After careful review of existing conditions, the 
public land study committee felt that it would be inappro- 
priate to make immediate decisions on the acquisition of 
land while some of the matters under consideration by the 
Planning Board were yet unresolved. The consultants noted 
above will have available materials proposed by the Land 
Study Committee and will use them in developing their recom- 



79 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

raendat ions . The Board and its members, as individuals, 
have met with private parties interested in the establish- 
ment of a private Land Trust and have worked with them to 
the extent possible. The Board has also endorsed the 
establishment of a town conservation commission at the next 
town meeting in order that if recommendations in this area 
are made by the consultants, a public agency capable of 
adopting the recommendations will be ijn existence. 

South Lincoln 

Discussions with the DPW relative to the relocation 
of Lincoln Road westerly turned out to be relatively fruit- 
less. The costs for construction of road and establish- 
ment or re-establishment of grade crossing signals under 
the plan appeared to be too high. While believing that 
the idea is essentially good, the Board does not feel that 
in the light of present fiscal conditions this is a feasible 
program. Should traffic on Lincoln Road build up and should 
the fiscal situation of the Town improve, the Board would 
suggest reconsideration of the idea. 

The Board, in accord with section 7K of the zoning 
by-law adopted at the annual town meeting in March, 1956, 
has been in discussion with two parties interested in the 
construction of shopping facilities in South Lincoln with 
a view to insuring the best possible parking arrangements. 

Conferences with other Committees 

The Board met from time to time with representatives 
of the Selectmen, Water Commission, Capital Requirements 
Committee, Roadside Beauti f ication Committee and the Boston 
National Historic Sites Commission. These meetings were 
fruitful in the ideas obtained from the others, and, it is 
hoped, from the contributions made by the Board itself. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Alan McClennen, Chairman 
Katharine S. White, Clerk 
Everett A. Black 
Walter F. Bogner 
George H. Kidder 



80 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



REPORT OF BOARD OF APPEALS 

Hearings were held on twenty petitions to the Board 
during the year 1957. Set forth below is a summary of 
the decisions. 

Petition filed by Henry Draper for the Massachusetts 

Audubon Society for permission to convert two two-family 

houses on South Great Road, South Lincoln, into two four- 
family houses. Petition denied. 

Petition filed by the Board of Selectmen for the Town 
of Lincoln for permission to use land at the corner of 
Codman and Lincoln Roads for a fire station and/or Police 
Headquarters, said area being less than 80,000 square feet 
of land. Petition granted. 

Petition of Charles W. Calkins, Jr. for a variance to 

allow a single family dwelling to be built on a lot at the 

northeast corner of Lincoln and Ball Field Roads. Peti- 
tion granted. 

Petition of Nicholas Lindsey for a variance to permit 
the extension of a non-conforming use by installation of 
larger gasoline storage tanks on service station premises 
at the intersection of Route 2A and the Turnpike By-Pass. 
Petition granted. 

Petition of Norman Brisson for renewal of a permit to 
store equipment in a gravel pit off North Great Road be- 
hind land now occupied by his nursery and landscape garden- 
ing office. Petition granted for a period of three years. 

Petition of Robert Ralston for permission to erect a 
nursery yard sign and to sell peat moss and grass seed, 
along with other nursery products, at his nursery on Old 
Sudbury Road. Petition denied. 

Petition of Thomas Pym Cope for a variance to alter a 
non-conforming house on Winter Street and to build a two- 
car garage across an existing driveway. Petition granted. 

Petition of Katrina C. Jenney for a variance to permit 
alteration of a non-conforming dwelling on Bedford Road. 
Petition granted. 

Petition of Ruth Barbarow for a variance to permit the 
alteration of a non-conforming dwelling on Old Sudbury Road 
Petition granted. 

81 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



Petition of Louise Damico for a variance to allow a 
trailer on her property on Mill Street. Petition denied. 

Petition of Abigail D. Avery for a variance to permit 
the addition of a bedroom and bathroom to a non-conforming 
dwelling at the corner of Sandy Pond Road and Lincoln Road. 
Petition granted. 

Petition of Clark C. Rodimon of Tower Road to secure a 
variance with respect to a parcel of land owned by the 
petitioner so as to permit the use of said property for 
residential building purposes, although the frontage of 
said lot on Tower Road is somewhat less than required by 
the Zoning By-Law. Variance granted. 

Petition of Erik J. Nelson for a variance to allow the 
erection of an attached garage 20 feet from the side lot 
line on Virginia Road. Petition granted. 

Petition of Richard E. Powers of Old Bedford Road for 
permission to build a garage and breezeway less than 30 
feet from the side lot line, Petition granted. 

Petition of John W. Fisher for a variance to allow the 
existing dwelling on Lot #12, containing 57,800 square feet, 
on Beaver Pond Road, to be extended so that the distance to 
side lot lines will be 36 and 46 feet respectively. Peti- 
tion granted. 

Petition of Henry B. and Charlotte T. Phillips for a 
license to allow the Motorola Company to install a two-way 
radio transmitter-receiver in, and a six foot antenna on, 
the garage of the peti tioner* ' -Tabof Hill Road property. 
Petition granted. 

Petition of Manley B. Boyce for renewal of a license to 
receive, sort, store and send out boxes, baskets and vege- 
table crates at his farm on Old Sudbury Road. Applicant 
granted license until November 21, 1960, subject to certain 
conditions . 

Petition of Mildred M. Rodimon for permission to operate 
a private nursery school in part of her home on Tower Road. 
Permission granted, such permission to expire at the close 
of normal school year in 1959. 

Petition of the Estate of Ogden Codman for permission 
to allow two-family occupancy of the farm house on said 
estate located on Codman Road, and, in connection with such 

82 






BOARD OF APPEALS 



occupancy, to place a temporary partition at the stairway 
and install a second kitchen on the second floor, all in 
accordance with a sketch accompanying the petition. Peti 
tion denied. 

Petition of Edward Boyer for renewal of license to sell 
new and used automobiles at his garage on South Great Road 
License granted until November 21, 1960. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Thomas B. Adams 
Henry B. Hoover 
Hans Van Leer 
William N. Swift 
John White, Chairman 



83 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 

Since the provisions of the new Town Building Code pro- 
vided for the establishment of a Board of Appeals under the 
Code, such a Board was appointed by the Selectmen in 1957. 
Mr. Lawrence Anderson was appointed chairman, with Mr. 
William Halsey and Mr. Stephen Herthel the other regular 
members of the Board. Mr. Donald Loveys, Mr. Walter 
Belanger and Mr. Robert Bygrave were appointed as associate 
members. 

Two cases were heard by the Board in 1957, as follows: 



Petition of William deK. Burton for permission to 
install a gas incinerator in his home on Concord Road in a 
manner contrary to the provisions of the Building Code. 
The petition was denied. 

Petition of Merrill J. Henley for George G. Tarbell, 
Jr. for a variance under the building code. The variance 
was granted. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Lawrence Anderson, Chairman 

William Halsey 

Stephen Herthel 

Donald Loveys 

Walter Belanger 

Robert Bygrave 



84 



INSPECTORS 



INSPECTORS OF BUILDING, PLUMBING AND WIRING 



Building permits issued during 1957: 
New residential buildings . . 
New non-residential buildings 
Alterations and additions . . 
Buildings demolished . • • • 

Fees collected 



34 

24 

26 

2 



$1,244.50 



Plumbing permits issued during 1957: 61 
Fees collected 



$ 647.00 



Wiring permits issued during 1957 
Fees collected 



102 



$ 451.00 



Respectfully submitted: 

William M. Dean, Building & Wiring 

Inspector 
Daniel J. Murphy, Plumbing Inspector 



85 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Fourteen meetings were held during the year. One was 
held with the Planning Board concerning possible change of 
use of land in certain parts of the Town, more especially 
a change in zoning from single family to industrial dis- 
tricts. A meeting was held with the officers and directors 
of the De Cordova & Dana Museum and Park relative to pro- 
tection of the shore and waters of Sandy Pond from trespass 
by guests which resulted in a decision to use warning signs 
instead of erecting a fence. So far the results are satis- 
factory . 

A very interesting Joint meeting was held with the 
Long Term Capital Requirements Committee. On the matter 
of renewals of water mains, the opinion was unanimous that 
the Department should consistently and regularly renew mains 
to avoid a financial burden at some future time when an 
extraordinary length of main might require renewing at once. 
Much discussion took place about the average daily gallonage 
which could safely be drawn from Sandy Pond without hazard- 
ing the supply. Fifty year records of annual precipita- 
tion, drawage by Lincoln and Concord, and the level of the 
pond were available, but no pattern was evident upon which 
to base a definite conclusion. Discussion also covered 
the question of lowering the intake in the Pond, and in- 
creasing the capacity of the pumping and the pipe to the 
reservoir. The question whether to invest more money to 
pump water from the pond faster, which could result in more 
curtailment of use in a dry period, or to save the money 
for searching for another source, is somewhat of a dilemma* 
The fact that the customers fared better last summer here 
than in most places influenced the Board to carry on with 
the same capacity for a time. 

The Board is taking advantage of low water to prevent 
leakage from the pond at high water by building a new dam 
and replacing porous earth in the buttments with clay. 
Mrs. Sagendorph very willingly cooperated with the Board 
by allowing the contractor to use her driveway and land for 
truck access to this job. 

The severest local drouth on record lowered the pond to 
a trifle over three feet below official high water mark. 
The State Department of Public Health was notified and Con- 
cord was limited to a daily drawage from the Pond of 200,000 
gallons. Lincoln customers were allowed unlimited use of 
water until the reservoir was losing water daily by round 



86 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 



the clock pumping. Rather than allow a hazardous water 
shortage in the reservoir, customers were notified July 10 
to curtail watering to between 6 and 8 p.m. until further 
notice. The ban was lifted early in October. 

Fixture rate billing for water was rendered in advance 
of the water used previous to the installation of meters. 
After meters were installed, because the Water Works did 
not then have enough surplus to skip a billing period, bill! 
were rendered in advance on the basis of meter readings, 
which represented water used. Confusion arose over this 
system of billing, as well it could, especially in the case 
of changes in occupancy between billing periods. There- 
fore, the Water Department, having sufficient surplus this 
year, omitted the July billing, billed from June to Octo- 
ber, and now will bill regularly in October and April. 
This system relieves the town office personnel from a bur- 
den at year end as an added advantage. 

Those who read the meters are frequently unable to enter 
the buildings, so they leave addressed printed cards on the 
premises for the householder to fill in and return to the 
Department. Customers are urgently requested to cooperate 
in this matter, because much time can be lost by repeat 
visits to read meters, and confusion may arise over bills. 
Those reading meters will wear an identifying badge. 

The Commissioners wish to express their appreciation 
for the interest and efficiency displayed by the Superin- 
tendent and his assistant. 

Water Department Statistics. January 1. 1957 

Pipe in use 31.0 M. 

No. of hydrants in use 239 

No. of stop-gates in use 283 

No. of blow-offs in use 27 

Range of pressure on mains 40 - 100 lbs. 

Total gallons pumped 127,231,800 gals. 

No. of services added 30 

No. of services renewed 12 

No. of services in use 086 

No. of meters in use 966 

Respectfully submitted: 

Edward S. Taylor 

Henry Warner 

Sumner Smith, Chairman 

87 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

During 1957 the elements were more considerate than in 
previous years. Because of the relatively open winter, 
we were able to complete the rebuilding and widening of 
Tower Road at the railroad crossing early in the spring. 
This was done according to specifications of the Department 
of Public Utilities and automatic gates were subsequently 
instal led . 

The new equipment purchased by the Town arrived in June 
and was put to good use. Road resurfacing was completed 
on Lincoln Road from Route 117 to the Wayland line, Brooks 
Road, Old Cambridge Turnpike, and, under Chapter 90 main- 
tenance, Route 126 from the Concord line south for about 
3/8 of a mile. Henderson's corner was also improved with 
hot-top. Considerable work was done on Trapelo Road 
raising catch basins and manholes, preparing it for the 
final surfacing. 

The lesser duties o-f the department included the usual 
cleaning up sand, resetting damaged cement posts, painting 
guard rails, clearing roadside brush and cleaning all catch 
basins. Several new catch basins were installed as well 
as drain pipes in rights of way belonging to the Town. 
In conjunction with the Tree and Moth Department, we sprayed 
elm trees along the roadsides and removed all the dead or 
diseased elms which had been cut down. In addition, much 
time was devoted caring for the two cemeteries under the 
supervision of the Commissioners. 

Of all Departments in the Town, this one is likely to 
receive the most complaints. It might be proper to point 
out here that we do the best we can with the tools we have 
and we cannot be everywhere at once. Our equipment is in 
good order and it is the desire of the members to give the 
Town the best service possible. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Raymond F. Maher 

Superintendent of Streets 



88 



CEMETERIES 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMI SSI ONERS 

During the past year many headstones and markers were 
repaired in two of the three Town Cemeteries, namely, the 
Arborvitae Cemetery, located at the corner of Trapelo and 
Lexington Roads, and the Old Burial Ground, located just 
to the rear of the Town Hall. 

Another project was that of removing many old and 
damaged arborvitae trees in the Arborvitae Cemetery, in 
preparation for replantings, which, it is expected, will 
take place in 1958. 

Aside from the above, normal work of a maintenance 
nature continued to be the principal activity during the 
year. 

For report on Perpetual Care Funds and Cemetery Invest 
ment Fund, see the Treasurer's Report. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Arnold MacLean, Chairman 
James DeNormandie 
Warren Flint 



LONG TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 

A detailed report of the Long Terra Capital Requirements 
Committee evaluating the proposals of the Town's boards and 
committees for capital expenditure and commenting upon the 
legal and practical limits of Town borrowing has been 
printed and distributed separately. 

Respectfully submitted: 

William M. Rand, Chairman 

Charles P. Kindleberger , Clerk 

Maurice E. Shank 

Elliott V. Grabill, for the Selectmen 

Everett A. Black, for the Planning 

Board 
William N. Page, for the Finance 

Committee 



89 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



REPORT OF POLICE-FIRE STATION BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Your Committee signed a contract for $86,500.00 in 
August, 1957, with Cardarelli Construction Company of 
Waltham to construct a Police and Fire Station at the 
Lincoln and Codman Road location. Work began in early 
September and was ready for interior finish just four 
months later. This interval marked two prolonged ex- 
tremes of weather conditions, - from dust-dry to the 
wettest early winter in local weather records. Credit 
for the expeditious work rest with Frederick H. Gagnon, 
the architect, of Worcester, Mass., and the skill and co- 
operation of the contractor. Other than about $1,000.00 
spent to remove ledge at the extreme edge of the founda- 
tion at the front of the building, extras have been few 
and nominal in cost. At the time of writing, it now ap- 
pears that the building may be ready for use by Town Meet- 
ing date. Exterior grading and planting will have to 
await favorable conditions in April. 

As far as can be foreseen, it appears your Committee 
will have sufficient funds to handle all costs including 
professional fees, services and basic equipment other than 
the alarm and exterior communications systems, - the latter 
being handled separately under contract with Hodson Fire 
Equipment Company. There should be sufficient balance left 
toward approaches and parking areas for about forty vehi- 
cles together with planting to screen the areas and build- 
ing from adjoining property. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Leo J. Algeo, Chief of Police 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Fire Chief 

William N. Swift 

Ernest Johnson 

Robert H. Booth, Chairman 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 



REPORT OF TOE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

1957 

The Elementary School Building Committee submits here- 
with its second interim report. 

Preliminary plans for the construction of the new elemen- 
tary school on the 10.7 acre site on Lincoln Road acquired 
pursuant to the vote of the Town at the Special Town Meet- 
ing on December 18, 1956, were presented for consideration 
of the Town at a Special Meeting on May 6, 1957. These 
plans provided for a structure comprising eleven classrooms, 
a multi-purpose room and administrative and auxiliary spaces, 
and were designed so as to permit eventual construction of 
a further unit of nine classrooms. To finance the expense 
of construction, the Committee recommended that the Town 
appropriate the sura of $5,000 from taxation and $525,000 
by borrowing, $125,000 of the latter amount to be borrowed 
within the normal debt limit of the Town and $400,000 out- 
side under the provisions of Chapter 645 of the Acts of 
1948, as amended. The recommendation as to the cost of 
the structure was based upon a professional estimate. 

Following favorable action by the Town on these recommen- 
dations, the Committee proceeded to develop final plans and 
specifications and advertised for public bids during the 
first weeks of August, 1957. General bids were opened on 
August 26, 1957, and the general contract was awarded on 
September 3, 1957, to the N.D.C. Construction Co., Inc., the 
lowest responsible bidder, for the contract price of $375,460 
This amount was approximately $73,000 less than the profes- 
sional estimate indicated would be required for work in- 
cluded under the contract. Accordingly, after provision 
for the further cost of equipment, architects 1 fees and a 
reserve for contingencies, the Committee advised the Select- 
men and Treasurer that it was not then necessary that the 
Town borrow more than $475,000 of the total of $525,000 
authorized. Borrowing in the amount advised was accom- 
plished in early October. 

Clearing of the site and the start of construction of 
the school itself began right after signing of the contract. 
Construction has so far proceeded on schedule. The build- 
ing should be enclosed by approximately February 1, 1958, 
and ready for occupancy August l f 1958, the date called for 
in the agreement, barring as yet unforeseen delays. 



91 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



The Committee wishes to express its appreciation for 
the patient and cooperative manner in which Messrs. Ander- 
son, Beckwith &. Ilaible, the architects, have pressed their 
work to meet our demanding time schedule. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 
Andrew J. Dougherty 
Ernest P. Neumann 
Gerard C. Henderson, Jr. 
George H. Kidder, Chairman 



92 



LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

LINCOLN 1 LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 
Report as of December 31, 1957 

The Lincoln Land Conservation Trust was organized on 
December 2, 1957, by the undersigned, for the purpose of 
maintaining the rural character of the Town by holding land 
in trust for the benefit of the inhabitants of Lincoln. 
Membership in the trust is open to all citizens of the Town 
on payment of annual dues of $10. The organizing trustees 
have been given terms which expire serially; their success- 
ors will be elected by vote of the members. A copy of 
the trust agreement has been deposited with the Clerk of the 
Town and is available for inspection. Further copies are 
available for members or prospective members through the 
secretary or the treasurer. 

The Trustees organized a campaign to collect money to 
buy the 5 plus acres of Wheeler land on Sandy Pond, which 
had come on the market, to prevent its use as a building 
site. This campaign was successful. On December 31, 
1957, the Trustees were in process of concluding an agree- 
ment to purchase the land. 

Financial Statement on December 31, 1957 

Pledges of contributions (from 

72 members) $10,980.00 

Other members (12) 120.00 



$11, 100.00 



Assets 



Balance, Harvard Trust Co., Concord $ 8,468.40 
5 shares Anaconda Copper Co. approx. 200.00 
Pledges not yet due 2 . 365 .00 

$10,033.40 
Expenses 

Printing, paper, stamps, addressing 66 .60 

$11, 100.00 

Respectfully submitted: 
Term Expires 

1959 Charles P. Kindleberger , Treasurer 

1959 William N. Swift, Secretary 

1960 Sarah E. Brown 

1960 Warren F. Flint 

1961 William M. Rand, Sr. 
1961 Ann S. Monks 

1961 James V. Lennon 



93 



Ooacation 
ana JVecreation 

BEMIS FREE LECTURES 



Pursuing a policy of fewer lectures in order to get 
even more distinguished platform personalities the Trustees 
have engaged such people as Mildred Capron and for March 
14, 1958, the famous author and witty lecturer, Miss 
Emily Kimbrough. 

The increasing attendance and the closing of the 
balcony at the Town Hall may soon force the issue of a 
change in location for the lectures. This has been dis- 
cussed before and we believe that it would require legal 
action before it could be arranged. The Trustees wel- 
come suggestions for individual lectures as well as types 
of programs, for such ideas in the past have often been 
incorporated in the program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mabel H. Todd 

Paul Brooks 

Christopher W. Hurd, Chairman 



94 



LIBRARY 

REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN LIBRARY 

To any group of trustees or committee there comes a 
period when unusual problems arise at some time, and such 
it has been for the Lincoln Library Trustees in 1957. 

First has been the necessity of selecting a Librarian 
to succeed Mrs. Farrar. For 27 years she has served 
efficiently and faithfully. Because of statute require- 
ments and the passing of years, her retirement at the end 
of November became mandatory. Mrs. Farrar has been made 
Librarian-Emeritus and has volunteered to help her successor, 
Mrs. Thoma, learn the intricacies of the position without 
any expense to the Town. Such commendable service is un- 
usual and of such value to the Library and the new Librar- 
ian that we must never forget her outstanding service in 
the past, nor her very gracious help at this crucial time. 
A Librarian is the key person of every phase of library 
service and management, It is our hope and wish that our 
Librarian-Emeritus enjoy health and be able to aid us with 
her advice for years to come. 

As the Town has grown, the use of the Library has in- 
creased. In ten years the volumes used have increased 
from 14,083 in 1947 to 25,404 in 1957. 756 people borrowed 
in 1947 and in 1957 an average of 160 books were loaned each 
day the Library was open. The Library was open three days, 
nineteen hours a week then, and now is open four days, 
twenty-two hours a week. Contemplated, and desirable, is 
that the Library be open six days. This the Trustees hope 
to make possible soon. But to meet this situation we be- 
lieve that a full time Assistant Librarian should be en- 
gaged. Part time assistants have been able and helpful in 
the past and their services have been much appreciated; but 
none have wished to consider full time and a career situa- 
tion. 

In Library Trustee reports of several previous years 
certain handicaps to proper and reasonable services have 
been noted. The need of increased physical facilities are 
very obvious to the Trustees and to many citizens. A 
building addition seems to be a necessity. The Long-Term 
Capital Requirements Committee has recognized such and the 
logical answer was the decision of the Town to select a 
Library Addition Building Committee. 

The Trustees, as ex-officio members of this committee, 
have contributed their ideas of the actual present and 
future needs of the Library so as to make it better able to 



95 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



meet and anticipate the services expected^for several years 
hence . 

Better children's facilities, more room to store books, 
a quiet reading room, a reference room, an historical room, 
and several ancillary services are now needed, and are in- 
cluded in the plans. 

The Trustees have visited other libraries and have con- 
tacted the personnel of the Division of Libraries of the 
State Department of Education, the librarians or trustees 
of some ten neighboring and similar towns. Our problems 
were presented to them and their advice asked, especially 
as to library policy. Without exception they were unani- 
mous in agreeing that our procedure is correct. They 
agreed that a public library is for all ages and persons 
and should attempt to make its services available to every- 
one in the community as far as possible. It is gratifying 
to know that other citizens are sufficiently interested in 
our problems to also study them. 

As the Trustees realize that the increasing duties of 
the Chairman of the Selectmen and the Chairman of the School 
Committee in their particular domains make it difficult for 
them to give thought and participation as ex-officio members 
of the Library Trustees; and also because a broader repre- 
sentation of the townspeople might be desirable in the 
trustee group, an article has been placed in the Town 
Warrant. This is aimed to give the Trustees direction to 
take whatever action is necessary to alter the terms by 
which on March 3, 1884, the Town accepted the gift of land 
and building now used as the Library. 

Mr. David Mann died in 1957. He was an ardent supporter 
of the Library and contributed much in time and effort to 
keep our tower clock in adjustment and repair. Each tread 
of the belfry stairs has his foot imprints and the Town 
should well remember his faithfulness to the task. 

There are many friends and groups who have contributed 
books, exhibits and flowers to whom we are grateful. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Alice G. Meriam John W. Carman 

Charles K. Fitts George G. Tarbell 

Roland C. Mackenzie, Chairman 



96 



LIBRARY 



LINCOLN LIBRARY 



Open Monday, Wednesday, Friday 
three to nine p. m. 
Saturday, two to six p. in. 
Closed on legal holidays. 



Statistics, 1957 
Number of volumes, January 1, 1957 
Number of volumes added by gift 
Number of volumes purchased 
Number of volumes withdrawn 
Number of volumes, December 31, 1957 
Number of borrowers, December 31, 1957 
Number of days open 
Amount of fines collected 

Circulation 

Fiction 7,435 

Non-Fiction 4,561 

Juvenile 12,222 

Periodicals 1,186 

Total 25,404 



15 


,859 




220 




497 




920 


15 


,656 


1 


,177 




159 


$504.30 



97 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



List of Donors to the Library in 1957 



Mrs. Archibald Adkins 
American Legion Post 84 
Mrs. Lawrence B. Anderson 
Miss Virginia G. Armstrong 
Mr. Charles H. Blake 
Mr. Charles A. Bliss 
Mr. Charles V. Briggs 

Secor D. Browne 

Thomas J. Carney 

Paul Cook 

Bruce G. Daniels 
Alan Donaldson 

Alfred W. Douglass 



Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mr. 

Mrs 

Miss Olive B. Floyd 

Mr. Albert L. Fullerton 

Mrs. John B. Garrison 

Mrs. Norman Hapgood 

Mrs. Harry Healey 

Mrs. Stanley Heck 

Mrs. Robert S. Henderson 

Mrs. Pearson Hunt 

Mr. Charles P. Kindleberger 

Mrs. Charles S. Kubik 



Mr. Harold E. Lawson 
Mrs. Robert Loring 
Mrs. John W. Lumraus 
Mrs. W. R. Maclaurin 
Mr. Christopher Mar 
Mrs. Richard S. Meriam 
Dr. Richard S. Morgan 
Mr. Ethan A. Murphy 
Miss Katherine O'Sullivan 
Mrs. Edward C. Parish 
Mrs. George E. Peterson 
Mr. Alan Phillips 
Mrs. Ralph J. Ruocco 
Mr. Clement C. Sawtell 
Mrs. Howard Snelling 
Mr. George G. Tarbell 
Miss Mary Taylor 
Mrs. Arthur E. Thiessen 
Mr. Henry DeC. Ward 



98 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 
LINCOLN RECREATION COMMITTEE 



SUMMER PROGRAM 



The Summer Playground enjoyed one of its most successful 
seasons under the supervision of Mr. Joseph Herlihy of the 
Smith School Staff. We were fortunate in having Miss 
Helen Gradeski as Assistant in charge of the handicraft 
program. The junior members of the staff included Phyllis 
Harvey, Charlie Kindleberger and Doug Donaldson. Doug 
also served as Swimming Assistant. 

A well coordinated program was presented which was 
attractive to all age groups represented. The activities 
included baseball, soft ball, basketball, trampoline, ten- 
nis, ping pong, horseshoe pitching, handicraft, woodworking 
and croquet. On hot days and in the afternoons quiet games 
were offered. Several cook-outs were held on Fridays and 
a Field Day concluded the activities of the season. Four 
field trips were taken to Whalom Park, "Old Ironsides", the 
Stoneham Zoo and the Museum of Science. On Monday even- 
ings Alfred Davis conducted a baseball clinic for boys of 
junior and senior high school and college age. This was 
so enthusiastically accepted that it will be included next 
year again. 

Professional tennis instruction was provided on Monday 
and Wednesday mornings. This year matches for the children 
were scheduled with the Concord Country Club youngsters and 
were enjoyed immensely. It is hoped that next year more 
inter-town competition can be arranged. 

This year our Playground Program and that of the Red 
Cross Swimming Classes were coordinated. We are pleased 
to report that an average of 185 children received swimming 
instruction five days a week for six weeks. This compared 
with last year's figure of 60 children per day per week 
indicates to us that this plan met favorably with the citi- 
zens of the Town. We are grateful to Mrs. Mary Belanger 
for her tireless efforts to make this program such a suc- 
cess. 

The Tennis Sub-Committee of James Mar, William Swift 
and Fred Walkey did an excellent job with this program. 
The courts were used more than ever before and a very suc- 
cessful tournament was conducted after Labor Day. The 
Ladles Program on Tuesday mornings was well attended. 
Plans for next year include a Spring tournament for both 
adults and young people. The committee wishes - to thank 

99 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



the tennis enthusiasts for their assistance in keeping the 
courts in good order, 

WINTER PROGRAM 

Mr. Roland Robbins of our committee headed up this as- 
pect of our efforts. Enthusiasm ran high for the badmin- 
ton program on Thursday evenings directed by Mr. & Mrs. 
George Burk. It is hoped that the citizens of the Town 
will avail themselves of this enjoyable sport. On Satur- 
day afternoons "Chick" Mayo supervised basketball sessions 
for junior and senior high schoolers in the Smith School 
Gymnasium. 

The committee wishes to express its appreciation to the 
School Committee for the use of the facilities of the Smith 
School without which our program would not have been such 
a grand success. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Astrid Donaldson Mary Belanger 

Sadie Sherman John Barnaby 

James Mar Roland Robbins 

John Garrison Ernest Johnson 

Albert Avery, III, Chairman 



100 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 

DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
Report of the Board of Directors, 1957 

In the year 1957, the De Cordova and Dana Museum and 
Park has followed much the same pattern set previously, with 
emphasis on the Museum with its varied exhibitions and activ 
ities, and on the school with its program of classes in the 
arts for both adults and children. These activities are 
dealt with in detail in the report of the Executive Director 
which follows, so will not be dwelt upon here. This year 
has been successful with heavy attendance at all major ex- 
hibitions and over-subscription to almost all classes. 

The Museum obtains the bulk of the funds for its opera- 
tion from the B Trust under the Will of Julian de Cordova. 
The trustees of this fund pay each year 70% of the income 
thus derived to the Museum, and at their discretion may pay 
the remaining 30%. Since the income thus derived has re- 
mained fairly static over the past ten years, and costs of 
operation have steadily risen, the Museum has found itself 
in the uncomfortable position of having to borrow from its 
reserve funds. At the suggestion of the Trustees under 
the will of Julian de Cordova, the Directors of the Museum 
petitioned the Town to request the Trustees to pay the 
Museum 100% of income during 1957. The trustees felt that 
although they understood the position of the Museum, they 
also had a strong responsibility as keepers of the B Trust, 
and wished to have a clear directive for any action they 
might take. The petition was presented at the special 
Town Meeting on May 7, 1957, and unanimously approved by 
the Town. The Trustees have complied with the request of 
the Town, the Museum's reserves are replenished, and it 
finds itself in a financially more secure position than for 
some years past. 

The Directors wish at this time to thank for their ef- 
forts the hard working staff of the Museum, and the host of 
volunteers who give so generously of their time, and upon 
whom depends so much of the success of the activities of 
the Museum. 

Respectfully submitted: 

John Quincy Adams, president 
William N. Swift, vice-president 
A. Bradlee Emmons, treasurer 
Elizabeth J. Snelling, clerk 
Paul W. Cook, Jr. 
Stanley Heck 
George Wells 

101 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Report to the Town for the Year 1957 

Two major concerns gave direction and impetus to the 
Museum's activity in 1957. We were concerned, first, with 
the task of administering the flourishing program estab- 
lished in preceding years. Exhibitions, classes for 
children and adults, and certain special events had evolved 
from the experience of our first six years to form the basis 
of our program in 1957; the resources of our plant and staff 
were almost wholly absorbed last year in sustaining and 
developing this provenly successful operation. 

At the same time, we were equally concerned with the 
need for continuing experimentation. The Museum's early 
achievement, the dynamic quality of its first six years 
derived almost entirely from its flexible, experimental 
outlook. While we take pride in the increasing stability 
of the program, we know that as the Museum grows, there is 
a tendency for old patterns to congeal into self-perpetua- 
ting routines. In 1957, with six years experience be- 
hind us, we were determined to build on the past without 
losing our readiness to forsake precedent, if need be,- for 
a new idea or a better way. Although we lacked the means 
and manpower necessary for broad experimentation, we did 
undertake two important new projects last year, the Crea- 
tive Arts Day Camp and the High School Scholarship Classes, 
and explored various methods for extending and improving 
our program of public education. 

In the report that follows, we have reviewed our major 
activities for 1957, suggested the areas in which further 
experimentation is important, and outlined some proposals 
for extensions of the program in 1958. 

EXHIBITIONS L EVENTS 

The attendance at exhibitions in 1957 increased as it 
has in each previous year; on many fine Sunday afternoons 
last spring and fall as many as 400 visitors came through 
the galleries. Our exhibition policy remained unchanged: 
to represent the best contemporary work available, to 
present, without bias, a cross-sectional view of major 
trends in the contemporary scene, and to introduce promising 
new talent to the public. Supplementing the exhibitions 
were lectures, panel discussions and films designed to help 
the layman understand the problems, the method and, to some 



102 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 



extent, the vision of the artist. In so far as our 
facilities allowed, we presented events in other branches 
of the arts -- music, drama, dance and motion pictures -- 
which appeared to have unusual merit and which might not 
otherwise have been seen or heard in this area. The ex- 
hibitions and events presented in 1957 are listed below 
in chronological order. 

January 6 Exhibition of prints by Stanley Hayter 

January 20 Exhibition of paintings by Robert 
Hamilton and Gordon Peers 

January 20 "Cityscapes " , exhibition of paintings 
by Mary Shore 

January 31 Percussion Concert, composed and con- 
ducted by Harold Farberman 

February 8 "Painters, Patrons &. the Public", a 

panel discussion with Robert Hamilton, 
Gordon Peers and Charles Kindleberger 

February 17 Orchestra-Chorus open rehearsal 

February 17 Exhibition of paintings by William 
Georgenes 

March 1 Exhibition by the American Watercolor 
Society 

March 3 Exhibition by the New Hampshire League 
of Arts L Crafts 

March 10 "The 20th Century Landscape", group 

exhibition of paintings arranged by 
the De Cordova Museum for showing at 
Symphony Hall and in Lincoln 

April 14 "An Evening of Poetry L Dance", with 
poet William Merwin and the Boston 
Dance Circle 

April 14 Exhibition of paintings by Jack Wolfe 

April 14 Exhibition of photography, "The Quiet 
Land", by Jack Breed 

April 14 Exhibition of photography by Francis 
Haar 

April 14 Exhibition of sculpture by Leo Amino 

May 5 Films, lecture by Jack Breed and 

Francis Haar 

May 10 Concert by the Lexington Music Club 

May 17 Concert by the Morning Chorale 

May 19 Gloria Vanderbilt Museum Purchase Ex- 

hibit, circulated by the American 
Federation of Arts 

May 19 Exhibition of prints by Olimpia 

Aimaretti Ogilvie 

May 19 Exhibition of watercolors and oils by 

Patience Haley 

103 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



May 24 "The Surrealist Ball", spring dance 

June 8 "The Festival of Mt . Olympus" 

June 23 Exhibition of paintings by the faculty 

of the Department of Art at the 
University of Wisconsin 

June 30 Exhibition of Japanese &. American 

watercolors circulated by the Ameri- 
can Watercolor Society 

September 15 Exhibition of paintings by George 
Pappas 

September 15 Exhibition of paintings by Marc 
Mo Id awe r 

September 29 Exhibition of modern French prints 
from the Kamberg Collection 

September 29 "Birds of Nature & the Nature of Birds", 
an exhibition representing 200 years 
of American bird painting and sculp- 
ture 

October 15 "Forged in Fire", sculpture exhibit 
circulated by the American Federa- 
tion of Arts 

November 10 "Margaret Brown Memorial Exhibition" , - 
group exhibition of paintings, draw- 
ings and sculpture 

November 17 Children's concert by the Concord 
Orchestra 

November 24 Exhibition of paintings by Howard Gibbs 

December 15 Christmas Concert by the Belmont Chorus 

December 21 Exhibition of work by children and 
adults in museum classes 

In addition to the above, a fall and spring film 
series presented by the Museum included these feature films: 
FANNY, PORT OF SHADOWS, MISS JULIE, THE IMPOSTOR, LE PLAISIR, 
2$ WORTH OF HOPE, THE LADY VANISHES and A NOUS LA LIBERTE. 

CLASSES 

The Museum's school continued last year to absorb a 
substantial part of our time and energies. Enrollment in 
each successive quarter in 1957 broke all records for com- 
parable periods in previous years. In the last quarter 
of 1957, five hundred and twenty-four children and adults 
were enrolled in thirty-one classes, and we had to turn 
more than two hundred and fifty applicants away. 



104 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 



THE PERMANENT COLLECTION 



The purpose of an art museum is revealed and its sig- 
nificance is measured in part by the quality and growth of 
its permanent collection. The De Cordova Museum is 
gradually assembling a collection of contemporary American 
art which demonstrates its dedication to the art and artists 
of our time. In 1957, twenty-seven drawings, paintings, 
prints and pieces of sculpture were added to the Collection. 
Ten were acquired by Museum purchase and the rest were the 
gifts of three donors: Mrs. Culver Orswell, Mr. and Mrs. 
Constantin Pertzoff and Mr. John Aiken. A portion of the 
collection is almost always on view; we try to keep a ro- 
tating selection on display in one of the galleries on 
the second floor. Regular visitors to the galleries have 
often spoken of the growing pleasure which they derive from 
works in the Museum's permanent collection. 

PUBLIC EDUCATION 

Many of our new, exploratory activities last year 
were in the area of public education, particularly the 
education of the juvenile and adolescent members of our 
public. We tried to find ways and means of broadening 
our services to young people and of enabling more of them 
to become actively allied* with the Museum. Thanks to the 
cooperation of art teachers and art supervisors in a great 
many schools and colleges, both public and private, we 
-have been successful in reaching more young people in 1957 
than ever before. These contacts have been as varied as 
the nature of the groups themselves. We have had Brownie 
troops and groups of graduate students visiting the Museum 
simultaneously. We have often received impromptu visits 
from art classes in Lincoln's Smith School which is so 
close that the children can walk over and back within a 
single class period. More conspicuous have been the 
visits by whole grades from some of the larger metropolitan 
grammar schools, when four or five busloads of more than 
one hundred seventh or eighth graders have swarmed over 
the building and grounds for tours and talks given by the 
Museum staff. We have presented lectures, gallery talks 
and conducted tours for visiting students; we have lent 
and exchanged exhibitions with grade schools and high 
schools; we have shown slides and films for grade school 
classes and assemblies. The opportunities for reaching 
our juvenile public appear to be almost unlimited. The 
task that lies before us now is two-fold: 1) to develop 
educational activities which will most effectively supple- 



305 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

ment children's schoolwork, and 2) to develop activities 
which children will find lively and interesting and which 
will lead them to a greater appreciation of art. 

CREATIVE ARTS DAY CAMP 

The Summer Day Camp was perhaps the most ambitious .of 
our 1957 projects for educating our younger public. It 
was the purpose of the camp to integrate a first-rate pro- 
gram of instruction in the fine arts with a comprehensive 
recreational program. During the six weeks the Camp was 
in session, 57 children received instruction in painting, 
sculpture, dramatics, dance, music, sports, swimming, 
games and nature study. Wherever possible, all these 
activities were focussed on and inspired by a series of 
weekly themes, e. g. "Indian Life &. Legends", "The Sea L 
Seafarers". The themes were introduced by means of 
stories, pictures, films, records and appropriate field 
trips to places like the Peabody Museum at Harvard and 
the U. S. S. Constitution. A main tent pitched on the 
Museum lawn served as headquarters, and from here groups 
of campers fanned out through the Park, into the building 
and to nearby woodlands, farms and meadows to take advan- 
tage of the abundant natural resources of this area. The 
Day Camp was a manifest success. Unfortunately, it 
critically overtaxed the Museum facilities and rather than 
undertake at this time the construction necessary to in- 
stall the Camp on a permanent basis, the Board of Directors 
voted to suspend operation indefinitely. However, an 
expanded program of classes in arts and crafts will be 
offered this summer, incorporating many of the most success 
ful features of the Day Camp. 

SCHOLARSHIP CLASSES 

The scholarship class started for teenagers last fall 
met with such immediately favorable response that it will 
be continued in 1958 and another added to the curriculum. 
Fifteen students enrolled in the first class which was 
open to youngsters from Sudbury-Lincoln Regional High 
School and'Wayland High School. They were chosen by their 
Art Supervisors on the basis of artistic aptitude and 
serious interest in art study. Working in a studio-like 
atmosphere, under expert guidance, "these students have ex- 
plored the creative possibilities of a great variety of 
media. The paintings and drawings which they exhibited 
at the Museum over the holidays represent some of the best 
work by this age group that we have ever shown. Their 
work has been exhibited recently at the Lincoln-Sudbury 



106 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 



Regional High, the Wayland High School, and the Smith 
School in Lincoln. 

MUSEUM CONFERENCE 

As host to the New England Museum Conference this 
fall, the De Cordova Museum was responsible for the pro- 
gram, speakers, publicity, registration, and the housing 
and feeding of 107 delegates. Scientists, economists, 
historians ... museum directors, teachers and trustees 
converged on Lincoln the weekend of October 4 and 5 for 
this regional conference of the American Association of 
Museums. Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., Harvard historian, 
and E. Cary Brown, M. I. T. economist, came as guest ex- 
perts to lead discussions on the relationship of museum 
operation to changing economic and social conditions. 
Frederick Walkey, the De Cordova's Executive Director, 
was chairman of the Conference, and co-hosts were the 
Drumlin' Farm Wildlife Sanctuary of the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society and the Concord Antiquarian Society. It 
was a provocative, productive meeting, bringing some of 
the keenest and best informed minds in the business to 
bear on the critical issues which confront Museums in 
every field today. A detailed summary of the Conference 
proceedings has been published and copies are available 
at the Museum on request. 

VOLUNTEER SERVICES 

An annual review of the Museum program always reveals 
our debt to volunteers. In 1957 the scope and magnitude 
of the contributions made by volunteers was greater than 
ever before, due, in part, to the activities of our 
Associate Council. The Council is one year old and has 
more than proved its value assisting the Director, co- 
ordinating the work of all volunteer committees and pro- 
viding liaison between the Museum and Associates in neigh- 
boring communities. The achievements of various sub- 
committees of the Associate Council are summarized below. 

Festival 

As in previous years, volunteer activity in 1957 
focussed most conspicuously on the Spring Festival. Mrs. 
Frederick Greene, general chairman, mobilized a force of 
staggering numbers and versatility to produce "The Festival 
of Mt. Olympus'*. Diligent researchers into the mythology 
and history of Ancient Greece brought forth the inspira- 



107 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



tion for a spectacularly successful celebration which 
drew thousands of visitors to the Museum and netted $3000 
for the Building Fund. 

Dance 

Mrs. Eliot Hubbard III and Mrs. Leonard Moss master- 
minded the production last May of the Surrealist Ball, 
the biggest party in the Museum's history. The dance 
floor, tables and chairs were set up on the lower terrace 
of the Museum Park under a giant tent. The weatherman 
was beneficent and more than 500 guests came. Gay, 
gregarious, elegantly groomed, they danced under a billow- 
ing expanse of canvas, strolled among flaming giraffes, 
savored the beauty of the spring night and marvelled at 
the astonishing spectacle of which they were themselves 
a part. 

Hospitality 

For year-round, untiring and largely unsung service 
to the Museum, we extend our gratitude to hospitality co- 
chairmen, Mrs. Henry Hoover and Mrs. Richard Thorpe. 
Graciously and competently, month in and month out, they 
assume responsibility for entertaining visiting celebrities 
and for providing refreshments and/or hospitality as re- 
quired at openings, lectures and concerts. 

Landscape Development 

Mrs. Stanley Heck, representing the Lincoln Garden 
Club, and Mrs. Gordon Osborne, chairman of the Museum's 
Landscape Development Committee, last year sparked a much- 
needed, long-range program for the development of the 
Museum Park. With the advice of a landscape architect, 
a plan has been worked out which calls for an arboretum 
planting to extend eventually through the entire park. 
It will be carried out in stages by the successive develop- 
ment of five major areas. The Lincoln Garden Club has 
further contributed to the development of the first area 
through the donation of forty dogwood trees and twenty 
flowering crabs, and has announced plans for a wild flower 
planting to be started in 1953. The continuing interest 
and generosity of the Garden Club are deeply appreciated. 
We depend on this kind of community support for the ulti- 
mate development of the Park. 



108 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 



SALES DESK 



The Museum's new sales desk and its art library are 
both managed on a volunteer basis by Mrs. John Lincoln. 
The sales desk is operated as a supplement to the Museum's 
program of art education, carrying authoritative and in- 
formative books on contemporary art and art history. In 
the past months, Mrs. Lincoln has added substantially to 
the number and variety of books which are available at the 
sales desk and reports a corresponding increase in the 
volume of sales. On Sunday afternoons, Mrs. Norman Hap- 
good occasionally substitutes for Mrs. Lincoln in manning 
the desk and answering the many questions visitors have 
about exhibitions and about the Museum's program. 

ASSOCIATES 

The number of individuals and families who support 
the Museum as Associates Increases every year. In 1957 
we gained 139 new Associates to bring the total to 874 on 
December 31. The steady growth in our Associate member- 
ship is gratifying to us not only as an important source 
of financial support, but equally as a reflection of con- 
fidence in our program. 

PLANS FOR 195 8 

The DeCordova Museum begins the new year with a basic 
program that is successful in terms of the standard criteria: 
it attracts the public in greater numbers every year to 
classes, exhibitions and special events; it fully utilizes 
the resources of the staff and plant; it enjoys a credita- 
ble reputation in art and museum circles; it fulfills the 
requirements of prudent management. 

We could, of course, repeat this program in 1958 with 
confidence that next year's annual report would be essen- 
tially the same as this. We are not inclined, however, to 
rest content with the status quo; there are too many oppor- 
tunities for improvement, too many important jobs still to 
be done. 

We know, for example, that we have explored only a 
few of the many ways of relating art to our daily lives. 
We know we can do much to make our exhibitions more meaning- 
ful and enjoyable to the public. Specifically, we want to 
be able to provide gallery talks, slide lectures, and de- 
tailed, informative catalogues and labels in conjunction 
with all important exhibits. We want to improve the quality 



109 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

of our exhibitions and we want to broaden their scope, to 
include more sculpture, especially, and to represent a 
wider geographical area. 

We know there is a need for further study and experi- 
mentation in the field of art education for children, espec 
ially on the secondary school level. This is one reason 
that two scholarship classes for teen-agers have been in- 
cluded in the 1958 curriculum. We want to work more close 
ly with local schools in coordinating special exhibitions 
and programs at the Museum with children's work at school. 
We want to encourage more teachers to bring groups of 
students to the Museum and we want to make these visits 
worthwhile by presenting instructive, entertaining programs 
appropriate to the age levels of the visiting children. 
We want to offer all-day clinics on art education for art 
teachers and supervisors from schools in this area; bring- 
ing guest experts and educators together to exchange views 
on theory and practice; such clinics would inevitably pro- 
mote the study and dissemination of improved methods of 
teaching art to young people. 

These are our immediate goals; we hope to find means 
of translating them into action in 1958. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Frederick P. Walkey, 

Executive Director 



110 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 
DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
OPERATING STATEMENT 1957 



INCOME 



Trust Income 

A Trust $8,400.00 

B Trust 49.144.23 

$57,544.23 

Dues from Associates 7,961.00 

Contributions .... 361.28 

School tuition 

Adult classes ... $15,336.91 
Children 's 

classes 9 . 792 . 25 

25,129.16 

Sale of school supplies, books ... 4,201.47 

Admissions 11,159.89 

Interest on savings 552.79 

Miscellaneous 1 .445 .46 

(firewood, services) 

TOTAL INCOME $108,355.28 

EXPENSE 

Equipment $ 3,741.33 

Administrative salaries 34,162.67 * 

Administrative expense 1,054.96 

School expense (supplies, salaries) 

Adult classes 11,134.70 

Children's classes 8,223.77 

Utilities & Fuel 4,425.82 

Insurance &. Taxes 

(social security) 3,027.13 

Repayment of loan, interest ...... 4,517.84 

Supplies, maintenance 3,145.50 

Cottage 828.88 

Publicity, mailings 4,220.14 

Exhibitions 2,805.74 

Subscriptions, memberships 251.91 

Events (concerts, dance, festival) 7,502.81 

Park maintenance 1,070.34 

Books, supplies purchased for 

resale 3,806.50 

Purchase of works of art 1,185.87 

Appropriations to reserve funds .. 11,850.00 

Miscellaneous 373 .47 

TOTAL EXPENSE $107,329.38 



EXCESS OF INCOME OVER EXPENSE $ 1,025.90 

No attempt has been made to allocate to the operation of 
the school any part of administrative salaries and expense: 
or other overhead items. 



Ill 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



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112 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP TRUST FUND 

Since the March, 1956, Town Meeting voted to establish 
the Lincoln Scholarship Trust Fund, assets have grown to 
almost triple the amount of the initial gift of $1,000 made 
by Fanny S. Campbell to the Lincoln School Association, 
In addition, awards totaling $750 have been made to deserv- 
ing Lincoln students. By February, 1958, $400 more will 
be paid to the colleges and universities the 1957 winners 
attend. Payments are made in equal instalments at the 
beginning of each semester. 

Lincoln high school seniors, or graduates, desiring 
further education or specialized training, are eligible. 
Awards are made on the basis of good citizenship, scholar- 
ship and financial need. 1957 winners were Phyllis Campo- 
basso, Valerie Chodsky and Stephen Murphy. 

The creation of a permanent fund has provided the oppor- 
tunity for public spirited donors to aid deserving students 
to achieve their educational goals. The fund administra- 
tors are very grateful to the community for its enthusias- 
tic response. Under the able chairmanship of Christopher 
Hurd, the scholarship fund raising committee of the Lincoln 
School Association sponsored a highly successful general 
appeal letter to the town which raised $984.85. In addi- 
tion, the Lincoln School Association contributed $100 from 
its treasury. The Smith School students voted to contri- 
bute $225 from their operetta proceeds. One graduating 
home room, 8C, gave $26.40, and the 4-H Horse Club, the 
first organization not connected with the school to do so, 
contributed $125. 

At present, the term of office for administrative com- 
mittee members is 1 year. The three members are appointed, 
one by the town moderator, one by the Chairman of the School 
Committee, and one by the senior Lincoln member of the 
Regional High School Committee. Terms expire at town meet- 
ing. This is at the time when the committee should be in 
full operation. Thus, there is not continuity between 
committees, which could result in jeopardy to the interests 
of students wishing to apply for awards. 

Therefore, the administrative committee recommends that 
the terras of office for members be extended to 3 years, and 



113 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



that these terms be staggered so as to provide necessary 
continuity. An article will be entered in the warrant 
to amend the trust to this effect. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Barbara G. Davis, Chairman 

Malcolm D. Donaldson 

Alice E. Garrison 

James F. Gray, member ex officio 



114 



SckooL (jOYnmith 



ee 



Jveport 



to the 



C^own of bLncoln 




FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1956-1957 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 1958-1959 



September 


1 


Monday 




2-5 


Tuesday -Friday 




8 


Monday 


October 


13 


Monday 


November 


11 


Tuesday 




27-28 


Thursday-Friday 


December 


23 


Tuesday 


January 


5 


Monday 


February 


23-27 


Monday-Friday 


March 


2 


Monday 


April 


20-24 


Monday -Friday 




27 


Monday 


June 


19 


Friday 




19 


Friday 




22-26 


Monday -Friday 




29 


Monday 


August 


7 


Friday 



Labor Day 

Staff Organization 

and Workshop 
School opens 
Columbus Day Recess 
Veterans Day Recess 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Christmas Vacation 

Closing 
'School Resumes 
Winter Vacation 
School Resumes 
Spring Vacation 
School Resumes 
Commencement 
School Ends 
Staff Workshop 
Summer Session Starts 
Summer Session Ends 



Additional Calendar Data 



183 School Days. 

It is planned to dismiss school at 1:00 o'clock every 
Wednesday to permit faculty meetings, private pupil lessons, 
dentist and physicians appointments, club n/eetings, etc. 

Kindergarten morning and afternoon sessions will re- 
verse on February 2, 1959. 



115 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

ORGANIZATION 

Term Expires 

John W. Carman, Chairman 1959 

(Mrs.) Elizabeth Donaldson 1960 

Ernest P. Neumann 1958 

Meetings: Regular: First Tuesday of each month: 7:30 P.M. 

at the Superintendent's Office. 
Cl. 9-8172. 

Called: Third Tuesday of each month usually 

and other meetings as stated; time and 
place designated. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

James F. Gray, Lincoln Road, Cl. 9-9558 
Office at Smith School, Cl. 9-8172 

SECRETARY TO SUPERINTENDENT 

Solvay G. Valentine 

PRINCIPAL 

Harry T. Burke 
Office at Smith School, Cl. 9-8333 

SECRETARY TO PRINCIPAL 

(Mrs.) Clara E. Powers, Smith School 

RECEPTIONIST 

(Mrs.) Elizabeth J. Kane, Center School 

CUSTODIANS 

Harold Cuttell, Center School 
Jerome Griffin, Smith School 
Edward Moffett, Smith School 

OFFICE HOURS 

School Days ... 8:30 A. M. to 4 P. M. 
School Vacation . . 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 



116 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



No-School Signals 
Local signals will be given on our fire alarm system: 



7:15 A. M, 
7:30 A. M, 



3 -- 3 
3 -- 3 



3 repeated at 
- 3 



Radio station announcements will be read between the 
period of 6:30 and 7:30 A. M. On stormy mornings, if 
convenient, tune in on two or more stations since it is 
not always possible to get messages through to several 
stations in the brief time allotted us. Please refrain, 
too, from tying up local phone lines to school officials 
and bus operators during the morning hour, 6:30 - 7:30. 
We try to contact all of the following when it is necessary 
to announce "No School": 



WBZ 
WEEI 



1030K 
590K 



WHDH 
WNAC 



850K 
680K 



Announcements regarding "No School" are made by the 
Lincoln Superintendent for the Lincoln Elementary Schools 
(Grades K-8) 'only. 

Announcements for the Regional High School and Lincoln 
pupils in Weston High School are made by the Regional 
Superintendent and will be designated "Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional High School". 

Pupils should listen for the announcement which concern 
them as there will be times when the High School will 
operate even though the Elementary Schools are closed. 

During extremely stormy or cold weather, parents are 
urged to exercise their own judgment in sending the 
younger children. 



117 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

The importance of education in relation to world events, 
plus the growing proportion of tax dollars required by the 
public schools, have resulted in an increased interest on 
the part of the community. 

School policy is largely expressed by the budget and 
financial plans of the School Committee. The School Bud- 
get for 1957 totalled $250,569 of which $157,415 or 63% 
was allocated for teaching salaries. Expenditures in 1957 
for this item totalled $155,082. Under the merit salary 
plan this sum provided an amount which held existing staff, 
except those resigning for personal reasons, and covered 
the planned new staff. 

Your committee proposes in its budget for 1958 to (1) 
go forward with the merit salary program, (2) to maintain 
a' competitive salary scale, and (3) undertake a carefully 
planned recruiting program in connection with securing top 
flight people where vacancies exist. The budget recommen- 
dation for 1958 of $175,075 for teaching salaries is based 
on the above program. 

The other budget element deserving comment reflects the 
Committee's plans for making a start on a library in the 
school building, and integrated in the school program. 
This library will be located in an available classroom and 
will contain reference and supplementary reading material 
suitable for grades 4-8. The budget provides money for 
initial equipment shelving, catalogue, etc., - $2,200, and 
additional books - $1,763. In addition there will be a 
continuation of the program for developing classroom 
libraries, which in the future will be confined to grades 
K-3. Though no provision is made for a librarian in this 
budget, personnel will be necessary in the future. It is 
the Committee's opinion that the development of a library 
in the school will supplement rather than take the place of 
facilities for pre-school and school age children in the 
Lincoln Library. With the contemplated degree of colla- 
boration, both libraries will be able to serve the Town 
more effectively. 

It was with regret that your Committee accepted the 
resignation of Superintendent Douglass B. Roberts after 4 
years service in Lincoln. Dr. Roberts resigned in June 
to accept an appointment as Superintendent of Schools in 
Glens Falls, New York. At the end of the school year 
Robert B. Patch, Principal, resigned to accept an appoint- 
ment as Superintendent of Schools in Marion, Massachusetts. 

118 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



Both appointments represented material professional ad- 
vancement, and though their departure is regretted, we wish 
them well. 

James F. Gray, an energetic, forceful, well-trained 
applicant, was appointed Superintendent in August after 
searching interviews with many candidates. To take over 
as Principal we were fortunate in being able to advance a 
well-liked, long time member of our teaching staff, Harry 
Burke. These two appointments provide a good administra- 
tive team to carry our plans forward. 

Growth of the Town continues. Enrollment in September 
1957 was predicted at 701, and present count is 705 in 
K-8. Estimated enrollment in September 1958 is 754. In 
view of the continued growth, the Committee recommends the 
appointment of another Building Needs Committee at the Town 
Meeting in March so that the school construction plans may 
keep pace with the population growth. 

Early in 1957 there was much discussion regarding housing 
for the Air Force personnel at Hanscom Field and the ques- 
tion of provision for, and operation of, schools for the 
children in that development. The Town took action under 
an Article on this subject in March of 1957. The results 
were relayed to the Air Force at Hanscom Field and though 
plans are proceeding on a housing development of about half 
of the originally planned size, there has been no request 
for further discussion of schools by the Air Force. 

The inauguration of joint meetings of the staff of the 
Lincoln School and the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 
have served to coordinate at the working level the related 
programs of both schools, and such cooperation will be 
continued . 

The task of carrying forward the plans for stepped-up 
staff recruiting, for merit salary administration, for the 
inception of an improved library program in the schools, 
together with the day to day conduct of the system will 
challenge our administration, and will represent sound 
progress toward our goal of an outstanding school. 

Respectfully submitted: 

John W. Carman, Chairman 
Elizabeth Donaldson 
Ernest Neumann 

Lincoln School Committee 
119 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
1957 

The 1957 school enrollment was estimated to be 701. The 
actual count came to 705, which means the schools are grow- 
ing approximately two classes per year. The upper grades 
have three sections, the lower grades have four, and the 
kindergarten will increase to five, if we are to maintain 
our policy of twenty-five pupils per class. The 1957 cen- 
sus showed that 53% of the townspeople have children in the 
elementary schools. 

The construction of a new primary school was voted at 
the regular town meeting. Contracts we're awarded in 
August and construction began in early September. It is 
anticipated that the school will be ready for occupancy by 
August, 1958. 

Several staff changes were made during the year. Dr. 
Roberts, the superintendent, resigned to accept a larger 
position in Glens Falls, New York. Mr. Patch, principal, 
resigned to accept the Superintendency at Marion, Massa- 
chusetts. Two teachers resigned for maternity leaves. 
Three faculty members were married and moved from the 
Lincoln district. Mr. Rhodes, seventh grade math teacher, 
accepted a position as elementary principal in the Dover 
Schools. Three teachers left because their husbands 
transferred to other geographic regions. In addition to 
filling the vacancies caused by these resignations, several 
additions were made to the staff. A full-time instructor 
in girls physical education was added to the staff. A 
science teacher was added to grades 7 and 8 and given the 
additional responsibility of building and supervising the 
entire school science program from kindergarten through 
grade eight. A music supervisor was employed on a three 
day Lincoln, two day Sudbury, basis. 

One third of the faculty spent the six week summer 
session analyzing the current science and spelling program. 
From this evolved recommendations for revisions. The 
entire summer program is presently under evaluation to 
determine whether or not it should be continued and ex- 
panded . 

The Science Research Associates Reading Laboratory was 
introduced for the first time this year as a part of the 
eighth grade developmental language arts program. The 
Science Research Associates unit was developed and prepared 



120 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



on the assumption that: 

1. The student must start "where he is" in independent 
reading and be allowed to master the skills of that 
level at his own rate. 

2. The sequence of materials shall be of gradually in- 
creasing difficulty so that the student may seek and 
attain progressively higher reading levels. 

The students reacted very favorably to the program. 
Typical comments were, "It helped me to gain a speedier but 
thorough comprehension of all reading material and I find 
I'm more proficient in my outside studying". The same 
program will be continued in the eighth grade next year and 
offered to the sixth and seventh grades as well. 

In addition to the regular testing program the Coopera- 
tive Sequential Test in Social Studies and Science has been 
added. If the test proves diagnostic it will be retained. 

The California Achievement Test indicated general 
academic growth on the 1956 scores. 

Lincoln Pupils 

1956 1957 

Below national average 54 or 13% 34 or 7% 

Above national average 389 or 87% 442 or 93% 

In top fourth in country 291 or 65% 321 or 577© 

In top tenth of country 131 or 30% 147 or 31% 

An initial attempt was made in the late fall to regroup 
the students in the 7th and 8th grades so they might receive 
instruction in keeping with their ability. The Princeton 
Cooperative Math Test was used as a screening device. The 
scores indicated that twenty eighth graders and two seventh 
graders had a proficiency in basic arithmetic; these were 
permitted to enter an advanced math group. Additional 
math and language arts groups were established at the same 
time for those students needing extra drill and individual 
attention . 

Screening of kindergarten children was started and it is 
expected that a definite experimental program will be com- 
pletely formulated by the opening of the new primary school. 

Respectfully submitted: 

James F. Gray 
Superintendent of Schools 
121 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

SCHOOL NURSE'S REPORT 

A report of school nursing for the year ending December 
31, 1957, is hereby submitted. 

Schools have been visited daily. There have been 603 
office calls for treatment or advice; 62 pupils were taken 
home; 418 home calls to check on absentees. 

Pupils have been weighed and measured and scalps ex- 
amined . 

Children entering Kindergarten, and others new to the 
first grade, were requested to have a physical examination 
to be done by their own family physician or by Dr. John A. 
V. Davies at the Well Child Conference. Audiometer tests 
were given with three children showing defective hearing in 
one or both ears; all were taken to their family physician. 

Vision testing showed five pupils with defective sight, 
three are now wearing glasses while at work, two are under 
observation . 

Three pupils were taken to Middlesex Sanatorium for 
tests; 17 teachers had Chest X-Rays, all negative. 

Dr. Howard Oaks succeeded Dr. David Farrell at the 
Lincoln Dental Service Clinic in May. I assisted him with 
oral examination of each pupil and with dental clinic one 
and a half days per week. Dr. Oaks has had one meeting 
with the second grade to talk on "Why brush your teeth" and 
"Why visit your dentist twice a year". 

I had three meetings with 6th, 7th and 8th grade girls, 
talking on "Growing Up"; "Habits"; "Behavior and Manners". 
Talks were held with first three grades to help them know 
me better, topic being "Who Am I"; "Why Am I Here Every 
Day" and "What Do I Do". 

Interviews with teachers were held frequently. 

I attended health Institutes and Meetings held in Cam- 
bridge, Arlington, at Middlesex Sanatorium, Parraenter Health 
Center in Cochituate, and Boston. 

There were 33 cases of Mumps; 16 Chicken Pox; 5 Scarlet 
Fever; and 3 German Measles. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Marion N. Ober, R. N., School Nurse 
122 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL CENSUS 



A. Distribution of Minors 

by Age and Sex 5 years or over 7 years or over 

October 1, 1956 and under 7 and under 16 



1. Boys 116 293 

2. Girls 107 289 
Totals 223 582 

B. Distribution 

1. In public day school 207 495 

2. In private school 16 82 

3. Not enrolled in schools 2 

4. Special-Elementary 3_ 

Totals 223 582 



123 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



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124 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



PER PUPIL COSTS - 195 7 

1. Population of Town (1955 Census) 2,949 

2. Average School Membership 681 

3. Equalized Valuation, per pupil 9,715.52 

4. Operating Expenditures for Schools 247,815.89 

5. Receipts Accredited to Schools 43,447.00 * 

6. Net Expenditures from Local Taxation 204,368.89 * 

7. Expenditures per pupil 363.90 

8. Per pupil Net Expenditures from 

Local Taxation 300.10 * 

9. Receipts per Pupil 63.80 * 

10. Transportation Elementary 

Number of Pupils 613 

Mileage 41,858 

Expenditures 23,655.03 
Expenditures 

per pupil 34.74 

* Based on estimated receipts 



125 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

SCHOOL EXPENDITURES AND PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1958 

Expended 1956 Expended 1957 Proposed 1958 

I. General Control 

Salaries 11,600.00 12,518.87** 13,510.00 

Other Expenses 1,679.69 1,849.06 2,500.00 

II. Out-of-State 268.62 600.00 

III. Instruction 

Salaries 141,470.31 155,225.47 177,548.00 

Other Expenses 12,013.38 14,314.58 18,774.00 

IV. Operation 

Salaries 8,909.24 10,275.94 13,037.00 

Fuel 8,588.52 8,693.75 10,350.00 

Other Expenses 6,497.40 6,833.25 7,765.00 

V. Maintenance 

Repairs L Upkeep 3,911.94 7,987.78 10,274.00 

VI. Auxiliary Agencies 

Health 1,327.72 1,611.84 1,810.00 

Transportation 26,151.10* 23,655.03 26,286.00 

Tuition 18,866.25* 417.69 550.00 

Other Expenses 373.57 513.46 562.00 



1,860.87 2,803.00 

1,789.88 
247,816.09 273,107.00 



* Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School assumed expenses for 
High School Pupils as of September 1, 1956. 

** Illness of secretary reduced salaries $378.00. 



VII. 


Vocational 


1, 118.92 


VIII. 


Outlay 


1,431.48 


IX. 


New Equipment 






Totals 


243,939.52 



126 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



GRADUATED IN JUNE, 195 7 



James N. Aveni 

Albert Miner Avery, IV 

John Robbins Barnaby 

Marsha M. Belanger 

Francis E. Bellizia, Jr. 

Sheldon Alexander Briggs 

Helen Parrish Brown 

Joanne A. Buckett 

Laura Pauline Buerger 

Melvin Prestoja Burns, Jr. 

Lucy Eliott Bygrave 

Martha Linnea Carapobasso 

Sarah Cannon 

Catherine Rene Chausse 

Richard Charles Danosky 

Malcolm Lincoln Donaldson, Jr, 

Eileen Ann Dougherty 

John Sanborn Elliott 

John H. Finnerty 

Charles Kimball Fitts, Jr. 

Margaret MacRae Flint 

Craig J. Foley 

Gerard R. Fournier 

David Ross Garrison 

Roger William Gay 

Doris Joan Grason 

Richard Phillips Gregg 



Linda 



Kenneth L. Grinnell 
Diane Harvey 
Robert Maurice Herlihy 
Barbara Louise Herthel 
Judith Elizabeth Hoar 
Reuel W. Larrabee 
Elizabeth Elin Lennon 
Edward P. Lincoln 
Ernest Howard Mack 
John William Marchetti, Jr 
Linda Anne Marshall 
Susan Mayo 
Barry Moore 
Richard Illsley Moore 
Kenneth Edward Morey 
William H. Morse, Jr. 
Cynthia Ann Natoli 
Patrick H. Neary 
Martha Louise Norton 
Diane Louise Powers 
Christopher Arnold Roberts 
David Edward Rogers 
Priscilla Whitney Scott 
Ann Denlson Sturm 
Barbara Ann Swanson 
Sheila Jean VanWart 
Stephen E. Vercollone 
Ruth Woods 



CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL 



Phyllis Rae Campobasso 
Patricia Ann Day 
Manley Bernard Boyce 
E. Jean Chausse 
Charles Patrick Flanigan 
Robert D. Gray 
Phyllis Harvey 
Constance Mae Huntley 



Patricia Jane Lancashire 
Sally Crosby Meade 
Stephen Evans Murphy 
John Henry Norton 
Jean Robbins 
Karl Douglass Roberts 
Claudia Jeanne Smith 
Dorothy Hildred Snelling 
Mary Diane Williamson 



WESTON HIGH SCHOOL 



Valery Chodsky 
Peter Gregg 
George Heck 



Alan McClennen 
Blythe Page 
Charles Phillips 
Michael Rollins 



127 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



HONORS 



Phyllis Campobasso 



Certificate of Merit Annual High 
School Prize Examination at Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts; Town of 
Lincoln Scholarship; Colby College 
Scholarship. 



Stephen Murphy 



United States History Award; Town 
of Lincoln Scholarship. 



Valery Chodsky 



Scholarship to Harvard 



Blythe Page 
Charles Phillips 



2nd Honors. 

Highest Honors; certificate for 
outstanding achievement in Science 



128 



ELEMENTARY 9CHOOLS 

STAFF ROSTER - JANUARY 1, 195 8 

Name Position Training Appointed 

James F. Gray Superintendent of Fitchburg S.T.C., 1957 

Schools B.S.,B.U. t M.Ed. 

Harry T. Burke Principal Univ. of So. Cal., 1955 

B.S. Ed.,B.U., 
M.S.E. 

Phyllis Johnson Grade One Lesley College, 

B.S. Ed. 1946 

Augusta Sisk Remedial & B. U. , B.S.Ed. 

Testing Ed. M. 1949 

Ann G. Paranya Language Arts S.T.C. Montclair, 

Social Studies N.J.,A.B., Ed.M. 

Harvard College 1949 

Irma Antonangeli Grade Two Fitchburg S .T.C. , 

B.S. Ed., B. U. 
Ed. M. 1950 

Louis J. Sapienza Grade Three B. U. , B.S. Ed. 1950 

Hazel Flagg Grade Five Sargent 1951 

Joan B. Warren Kindergarten B. U. , B. S.Ed., 

Ed. M. 1951 

Albert S. Reed Physical Springfield Col- 

Education lege, B.S. , Ed.M. 1953 

George Drake Industrial Arts Univ. of Washing- 
ton, A. B. 1954 

Robert A. Leach Grade Six Univ. of Alabama, 

A.B. ,Ed.M. Univ. 
of Vermont 1954 

Julia Cole Grade Three Salem T. C. 1955 

Elizabeth Derby Music Univ. of Cincinnati 

B.S. Ed., Cincin- 
nati Conservatory, 
B. M. 1955 

Jerome R. Derwallis Grade Six R. I. School of 

Design, B.F.A. 1955 

Mary Salvucci Home Arts Nasson College, B.S. 1955 

Joseph B. Herlihy Grade Six Boston College, 

A.B., M. A. 1956 



129 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Name 



Kaxine Do Ian 



Amy Frye 



Position 
Kindergarten 



Mary R. Duplisea Grade Three 



Grade One 



Diane Furber Grade Four 
Elizabeth Grimm Grade Four 



Training Appointed 

Kansas S.T.C. 

B. S. 1956 

Wheelock College, 

B. S. Ed. 1956 

Wheelock College, 

B. S. Ed. 1956 

Tufts College, A. B. 1956 

Wheelock College, 

B. S. Ed. 1956 



Florence Justice Mathematics 

Judith Ackerman Physical 

Educat ion 



Ellen Ehrlich 



Joan Hart 



Ethel Lee 



Grade Five 



Suzanne Hanvey Grade Four 



Art 



Marianne Heidt Mathematics 



Grade One 



Howard MacCleave Language Arts 

Social Studie 

Doris McGuinness Grade One 



Phyllis McKenney Grade Two 
Jacqueline Michehl Grade Two 

Mary Reichenbach Grade Five 



Linda Siegel 



Music 



New Brunswick T.C. 1956 

Sargent College, 

B. U. , B.S. 1957 

Radcliffe College, 

A. B. 1957 

Prince Frederick, 

Md., B. S. 1957 

Mass. Sch. of 

Art, B. S. 1957 

Emmanuel College, 

A.B. , Harvard 

College, M.A.T. 1957 

Buffalo S.T.C. , 

B.S. 1957 

University of 

N.H. , A. B. 1957 

Univ . of Mass . , 

B.S. 1957 

B.U. , B.S. Ed. 1957 

Bloomsburg T.C. , 

B.S. 1957 

Bryn Mawr , A.B . , 
Univ. of Florence, 
Italy, Ed.M. 1957 

Oberlin B.M. Ed. , 

M.M. B.U. 1957 



David Webster Science 
Phyllis Williams Grade Two 



130 



Rutgers Univ., B.S. 1957 
B.U. , B. S. 1957 



REGIONAL 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

REPORT 



to the 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1956-1957 



REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1958 

School reopens January 2 

Winter Vacation February 17-21 

Spring Vacation April 14-18 

Memorial Day May 3 

School Closes June 20 

Last day for Teachers June 30 

School opens September 8 

Columbus Day October 13 

Veterans' Day November 11 

Thanksgiving Vacation November 27-28 
(minimum day on November 26) 

Christmas Vacation December 24 - January 2 

(minimum day on December 23) 



NO SCHOOL SIGNAL 

In the event of exceptionally severe weather conditions 
or when the transportation system is disrupted, WBZ, WEEI , 
WKOX and WHDH will broadcast the no-school announcement 
between 7:00 and 8:00 A. M. 

Whenever school is not held at the High School bus 
service will not be provided for tuition students attend- 
ing Weston High School. 

Since weather reports are not always reliable, and 
since the School District desires to render maximum educa- 
tional service, the schools will remain open except in 
very severe weather. 



131 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



REPORT OF THE 
LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, in only the 
second year of its operation, already is widely recognized 
in both public and private school circles as a school of 
unusually high caliber. 

The desire of both towns for a challenging curriculum 
has been fulfilled with courses geared to meet the needs 
and abilities of all students. Additional courses have 
been introduced in Mathematics, the Sciences, History, 
English and French. These are designed to encourage 
students of high academic potential to meet admission re- 
quirements at liberal arts and technical colleges of high- 
est standards and more importantly, to achieve maximum 
performance in their own particular area of proficiency. 

Although a majority of our students are entered in a 
college-oriented program, the content of courses for the 
non-college student is receiving constant attention. 
The Committee realizes its responsibility in preparing 
young people for a successful life in our American demo- 
cracy where their formal education may terminate at the 
High School level. Courses have been prepared specifi- 
cally for the non-college students in Mathematics, Science 
and English, which are oriented to their specific needs 
without reduction in cultural content. 

The school staff was quick to recognize the variations 
in the needs of the student body and brought forth the 
afore-mentioned highly refined program. By reason of 
their interest, as well as their training and experience, 
the Committee believes the school staff is well qualified 
to carry out this program. 

The Committee is constantly aware of the mounting tax 
burden that education is placing on the residents of 
Lincoln and Sudbury. Every item in the budget is care- 
fully scrutinized to obtain full educational value from 
each tax dollar. Until the capacity of the building is 
more nearly reached, it will not be possible to make 
meaningful cost comparisons. However, it is our constant 
aim to provide an educational program second to none at a 
cost comparable to other good schools of similar size. 

During the summer the Committee most regretfully 
accepted the resignation of Dr. Rexford Souder who had been 



132 



REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 



associated with the Region since the early planning stages 
and was chosen its first superintendent. The Committee 
was exceedingly fortunate to find Mr. C. Newton Heath to 
carry on the administration. Mr. Heath's wide experience 
includes service as a teacher, guidance director, principal 
and several super intendencies . He has been connected 
with the New Hampshire State Department of Education and 
has been associated in the planning and construction of 
eleven school buildings in addition to serving as educa- 
tional consultant for school buildings in Lowell, Lynn, 
Upton and the Regional School in Topsfield, Massachusetts. 

The Regional Committee and the two Towns suffered the 
loss of one of our most capable and devoted educational 
leaders on the death of William A. Wilson late in the year. 
"Tinker", as he was known to all his associates, served 
on the Committee since its inception. His contribution 
in fore-sighted planning and in the establishment of high 
educational standards is indelibly impressed on the school. 
He will long be remembered by all who worked with him. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Howard W. Emmons, Chairman 
John W. Carman 
Ellen DeN. Cannon 
Elizabeth B. Harding 
Victor A. Lutnicki 
Donald J. MacRae 



133 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

THE LINCOLN -SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Treasurer's Report 

Total cash balance, January 1, 1957 $141.271.27 

District Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1957 141,007.31 

Receipts : 

Lincoln assessment $121,235.80 

Sudbury assessment 196,661.12 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

Building construction 31,881.42 

Transportation 22,151.58 

Miscellaneous income 9,304.88 

Fire insurance settlement 5.731.86 386 . 966 .66 

$527,973.97 

Disbursements: 

District operating expenses $231,465.88 

Debt service: 

Principal 80,000.00 

Interest 33,835.00 

School construction 67,399.95 

Fire insurance settlement 



Cash balance, District Fund, December 31, 1957 $ 109.541.28 

Federal Reimbursement Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1957 $ 00.00 

Receipts 3 . 551 .00 

$ 3,551.00 
Disbursements 850.00 

Cash balance, Federal Reimbursement Fund, 

December 31, 1957 $ 2.701.00 

Cafeteria Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1957 $ 216.96 

Receipts 

Disbursements 

Cash balance, Cafeteria Fund, December 31, 1957 

Athletic Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1957 
Receipts 

Disbursements 

Cash balance, Athletic Fund, December 31, 1957 

Total cash balance, December 31, 1957 $ 113.051.46 

134 





20.713.34 


$ 


20,930.30 
20.370.42 


$ 


559.88 



$ 


47.00 




598.85 


$ 


645.85 


$ 


396.55 


$ 


249.30 



REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 



BALANCE SHEET 
December 31, 1957 



ASSETS 
Cash $113.051.46 

Total Assets $113 .051.46 

LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
Appropriation balances: 

Non-Revenue $ 14,238.20 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

State Grant: Construction costs 31,881.42 

Transportation 22,151.58 

Federal Reimbursement 2,701.00 

Revolving Funds: 

Cafeteria 559.88 

Athletic 249.30 

Surplus Revenue 41 . 270.08 

Total Liabilities and Reserves $113.051.46 

OUTSTANDING DEBT 

$ 80,000 2.20% School Bonds payable $5,000 May 1, 1958/1975 
inclusive. 

350,000 2.40% School Bonds payable $25,000 Nov. 1, 1958/1959; 
$20,000 Nov. 1, 1960/1974 inclusive. 

900,000 2.40% School Bonds payable $50,000 Nov. 1, 1958/1975 
inclusive . 

Respectfully submitted: 

George B. Flint 

Treasurer 



135 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the School Committee: 

The second Annual Report of the Superintendent of Schools 
summarizes the educational outcomes of our first full year 
of operation, and provides some insights to the future. 



The organizational s 


curriculum 


selections 


tiated the 


phi losophy 


We cannot, 


nor do we, 


graduating 


class depen 


tion. It 


will requir 


claim full 


success of 


their achievements, wh 


shared with those resp 


elementary 


grades . 


the fall follow-up of 



tructure, coupled with well guided 
for the student body, has substan- 
upon which the school was founded, 
claim that the success of our first 
ded solely on our one year of opera- 
e a four-year period before we can 
our students, and then credit for 
ich we hope will be many, must be 
onsible for their preparation in the 

However, we can be justly proud of 
our 1957 graduates. 



Students were enrolled in the University of Michigan, 
Beaver College, Boston University, University of Massa- 
chusetts, Bridgewater State Teachers' College, North- 
eastern University, Boston College, Pennsylvania State 
College, Vermont Junior College, Chandler School for Women 
and Chamberlain Junior College. With but one exception, 
all students who applied for college were admitted to the 
institution of their first choice. 



The placement of our first graduates follows 

Admitted to nursing schools .... 2 
Admitted to 4-year colleges .... 10 

Admitted to 2-year colleges .... 4 

Short term post-secondary training . 1 

Post graduate work 1 

Married 5 

Working 9 



6.3% 
31.2% 
12.7% 
3.0% 
3.0% 
15.7% 
28.1% 



There were thirty-two members in the class and thirty- 
one were graduated. 

Providing for a superior quality of education for the 
college bound student, as well as the best opportunities 
for the youth whose formal training may end with gradua- 
tion from high school, necessitates continuous survey and 
study of our curriculum. Currently, our Regional School 



136 



REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 



staff is evaluating the course offerings preparatory to 
completing a revised brochure of subjects to be offered 
in the school year 1958-59. This study is one phase of 
a more comprehensive evaluation of our total school. The 
larger study, known as an Evaluative Study, will encompass 
such major areas as Program of Studies, Administration, 
Guidance, Building, Library, and Activities. Citizens of 
Lincoln and Sudbury are working with the professional staff 
on this study. The evaluation will end in June, 1958, 
with a second study being made by a visiting team from the 
New England Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges. 

The senior class to graduate in June, 1958, has a member- 
ship of 37 students. In September, 1958, we can expect 
a freshman class of about 147. Our 1958 budget reflects 
this increase in instructional expense by the addition of 
nine new staff positions. These positions are being 
created for the expansion of our present curriculum offer- 
ings as well as for the additional freshman groups to be 
taught . 

The seven Sudbury junior high school classes will move 
from the Regional High School in the fall. This will 
provide the space necessary for the increased high school 
fall enrollment. 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School is fortunate to 
be staffed by a superior and dedicated corps of educators. 
Their attention to the individual pupil's needs is fore- 
most at all times in their teaching. The long range goal 
of the entire program is to^equip our youth with maximum 
background in skills so they may most effectively develop 
their maximum potential. Just so long as we are able to 
secure the services of well qualified staff members, we 
shall be able to accomplish such a goal. Our salary 
policy continues to make the best faculty selection possi- 
ble. 



The success 


of our h 


stantial de 


gree, on 


th 


who enroll 


as 


freshmen 


the Lincoln 


an 


d Sudbur 


consultant 


services 


re 


ments prior 


to 


high 


sc 


our staff h 


as 


met with 


ers in the 


e lementary 


correlation 


of 


subject 


plan to ext 


end 


this 


se 


activities 


in 


other 


su 



igh school program depends to a sub- 
e previous training of the students 

It is our policy to serve both 
y elementary school programs with 
lative to desired educational attain- 
hool entrance. During the past year 

the mathematics and science teach- 
schools of both towns to assist in 

matter being taught. In 1958 we 
rvice to more closely correlate our 
bject areas. 



137 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Two school publications, the Ninth Notes and The Tom-Tora, 
have been launched. They cover all current affairs of th.e 
student body. A house organ, or publication, is being 
organized by the administration and teaching staff to in- 
form our parents and citizens about our educational acti- 
vities. The first issue will be ready early in 1958. 

Some matters requiring early consideration to improve 
and further our program will include the expansion of our 
academic offerings in developmental reading, foreign 
language and the sciences. A "work experience" program, 
and provision for salable skill subjects, are being con- 
sidered for our vocationally minded youth. Our effective- 
ness cannot be determined only by the admission of our 
graduates to college or successful job placement. The 
degree to which they succeed after high school graduation 
is also important to us. A continuous "follow-up" of 
graduates by the guidance staff, on a one, three or five 
year basis is necessary. A system of pupil accounting 
procedures .and personal anecdotal records will be developed 
Such background data is vital to student adjustment and 
sound college placement. 

The school, through its faculty, curriculum, and physi- 
cal environment, influences and directs the educational 
growth of our youth. However, these influences can be 
effective only to the degree the parents understand and 
support the educational objectives of the school. Parent- 
teacher conferences, and visits with guidance staff and 
principal of the school, are solicited. 

Serving as Superintendent of Schools for the Regional 
High School for these past five months has been a gratify- 
ing experience. To be associated with the development of 
an outstanding high school program, in which the Citizens, 
School Committee and Faculty have demonstrated complete 
support, provides the highest professional incentive for 
any administrator. 

Respectfully submitted: 

C. Newton Heath 

Superintendent of Schools 



138 



REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
Regional District Operating Expenses 



1957 1958 
Budget 



Funds Available 

Appropriation, Salaries and Expense $243,635.00 $305,635.00 

Expenditures 

General Control 

Superintendent's salary $ 7,862.37 $ 8,750.00 

Other expenses 5,003.64 7,190.00 

Expense of Instruction 

Teachers' salaries 113,985.38 163,560.00 

Expense of school office 3,911.15 4,200.00 

Textbooks 5,187.68 4,000.00 

Supplies 6,273.00 7,015.00 

Expense of Operating School Plants 

Custodians' salaries 5,596.57 12,435.00 

Fuel 5,812.38 10,100.00 

Miscellaneous of operation 11,860.08 13,930.00 

Maintenance 

Maintenance and repairs 6,478.41 9,400.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Transportation 26,143.63 36,460.00 

Libraries 3,054.70 2,500.00 

Health and physical education 5,764.56 4,715.00 

Miscellaneous 3,253.05 5,035.00 

Tuition 15,591.16 7,095.00 

Other Expense 

Out of state travel 814.82 750.00 

Evening use of school buildings 300.56 500.00 

Vocational tuition 4.572.74 8.000.00 





4 


572 


.74 


$231 


465 


.88 


$ 


12 


169 


.12 



Total Expenditures $231.465.88 $305.635 .00 

Unexpended Balance 

Apportionments 

Total Budget $243,635.00 $305,635.00 

Less: Available Funds in Dist. Treasury 1.764.83 38.874.75 

Balance to be apportioned $241,870.17 $266,760.25 

Lincoln Apportionment $ 92,716.50 $ 93,894.87 

Sudbury Apportionment $149,153.67 $172,865.38 



139 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND STAFF 
January 1, 1958 
School Committee 



Howard W. Emmons, Chairman 
Victor A. Lutnicki 
Ellen DeN. Cannon 
John W. Carman . . 
Elizabeth B. Harding 
Donald J. MacRae . . 



Term Expire 
195 8 
1958 
1958 
1959 
1959 
1960 



Superintendent of Schools 



C. Newton Heath Hilltop 3-2662 

Office, Concord and Lincoln Roads, Sudbury 

Secretary to School Committee 

Lily T. Spooner , . . Hilltop 3-2662 

District Treasurer 
George B. Flint CLearwater 9-8611 

Teaching Personnel 



Leslie M. Tourville 
James A. Doucette 

Bramwell B. Arnold 
♦ Jean M. Arra 

Katherine D. Barton 

John W. Black 
♦Curtis C. Brooks, Jr. 

Ruth M. Buxton 

Miriam S. Coombs 

Joan Driscoll 

Marion F. Edwards 
♦Alan F. Flynn 
♦Anne T. Gombosi 

Mabel Greber 

Frank Heys, Jr. 
♦William F. Keough, Jr 



Appointed 




1956 


Principal 


1956 


Director of 




Guidance 


1956 


Mathematics 


1957 


Homemaking 


1956 


Ilomemaking 


1956 


Art 


1957 


Industrial Arts 


1956 


Latin-French 


1956 


English 


1957 


Engl ish -Dramatics 


1956 


Science-Counselor 


1956 


Mathematics 


1956 


Music 


1957 


Mathematics 


1957 


Engl i sh 


1956 


Driver Education 



140 



REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 



Appointed 



Helen D. Lelecas 1956 

Alexander G. Marshall, Jr. 1956 



Katherine R. McKenna 
Paul B. Mitchell 

♦Malcolm C. Oliver 
♦Elwood C. Philbrick 
Norman W. Platine 
Laura S. Pollock 

♦Mary L. Roberts 

♦Freda Serkin 

♦Olive Smith 
Roger T. Thurston 
Irene R. Tutuny 

♦Paul Volk 
Loretta Wertheimer 



1956 
1957 

1957 
195 6 
1956 
1957 

1956 
1957 
1957 
1956 
1956 
1956 
1957 



Business 

Mathematics- 
Counselor 

French 

Social Studies- 
English 

Industrial Arts 

Librarian 

Social Studies 

Social Studies- 
Counselor 

Physical Education 

Reading 

Music 

Science -Counselor 

Business 

Physical Education 

Science 



♦ Serve as teachers of Sudbury Junior High School as 
well as the Regional High School. 



Health Personnel 

Gordon D. Winchell, M. D. 

School Physician 
Virginia Whitney School Nurse 



CLearwater 9-8618 
Hilltop 3-2662 



School Secretaries 

Hilltop 3-2662 
Hilltop 3-2662 
Hilltop 3-2662 
Hilltop 3-2662 
Custodians and Maintenance 



Hope Baldwin High School 

Maria B. Campbell Superintendent's 

Office 
Marilyn A. Batchelder Superintendent's 

Office 
Lily T. Spooner Superintendent's 

Office 



William L. Long, Head Custodian and Maintenance 

George Pereira 

Harold Dowd 

Charles Vierira 

Oliver Wainio 

Eleanor E. Macdonald, Matron 



141 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Bus Operators 

Kenneth R. Hooper (2 buses) Contractor 

Eric Johnson Contractor 

Lincoln Auto Service (2 buses) Contractor 

George Fereira Leased Bus 

Oliver Wainio Leased Bus 

Cafeteria Personnel 

Helen L. Wheeler, Manager 
Rachel Adams, Cook 
Eleanor A. Darby 
Jane L. Parks 
Roberta F. Podgurski 



142 



REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 

LINCOLN -SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 

MEMBERSHIP BY AGE AND GRADE 

October 1, 1957 

BOYS 

Age 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Totals 

Grade 
9 12 32 11 1 1 57 

10 6 28 6 40 

11 9 28 2 39 

12 4 6 2 2 14 

Total 12 38 48 39 9. 2 2 150 



Age JJ3 14_ 15 16 17 18 19 Totals 

Grade 
9 15 5 2 77 







GIRLS 




14 


15 


16 


17 


55 


5 


2 




15 


35 


8 






5 


22 


1 






9 


11 



10 15 35 8 58 

11 5 22 1 28 

12 9 11 2 22 

Total 15 70 45 41 12 2 185 

Grand Total 335 

TUITION PUPILS ATTENDING OTHER SCHOOLS 
October 1, 1957 

12 Totals 

Weston 21 21 

Newton Technical High School 7 

Norfolk Agricultural School 1 

Walt ham Vocational High 1 

Worcester Boys' Trade High School 2 

Total Other Schools 32 



143 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Distribution of Students Between Lincoln and Sudbury 

Lincoln Sudbury Tuition Total 

Regional High 108 222 5 335 

Other schools 26 6 - 32 

Total 134 228 5 367 



144 



SiatisticaL information 



VITAL STATISTICS 

95 Births, 30 Marriages and 29 Deaths were recorded during the 
year 1957. 

BIRTHS 



Date of 
Birth 



Name of Child 



1947 
April 29 Anne Cunningham Everett 



Names of Parents 



Henry C. L Helen C. Everett 



1956 

Sept. 9 Carol Diane Westcott 

Sept. 17 Andrew Benton Hester 

Sept. 26 John Douglas Crawford 

Oct. 23 Elizabeth Briggs Bailey 

Oct. 27 Ann Marie Mahoney 

Nov. 11 Katherine Robinson 

Brainard 

Nov. 12 Christina Janette Striker 

Nov. 17 Benjamin Bacon James 

Dec. 6 Joan Marie Ward 

Dec. 18 Margaret Grace Walkey 



Charles E. & Mary L. Westcott 
Leon B. & Mary B. Hester 
John D. & Joanna W. Crawford 
Richard B. L Rebecca B. 

Bailey 
Gerald J. & Jeanne M. K. 

Mahoney 
Edward C.,11, 8c Elizabeth H. 

Brainard 
William W. & Marjorie Striker 
Hamilton R. L Waleska E. James 



Walter B. ,Jr 
Frederick P. 



L Marie L. Ward 
L Ruth R. Walkey 



1957 
Jan . 1 

Jan . 1 
Jan. 5 
Jan. 11 



Jan . 


17 


Jan . 


21 


Jan . 


27 


Feb. 


5 


Feb. 


14 


Feb. 


14 


Feb. 


19 


Feb. 


20 


Feb. 


27 


March 


3 


March 


6 


March 


8 


March 


8 


March 


8 


March 


9 


March 


17 


March 


17 



Baby Girl Rando 

Diana Lewis Shank 
Debra Anne Thompson 
Stephanie Lynn Gerson 



Jan. 15 Chris Allen Liston 



Lisa Ann Maselli 
Timothy Craig Mar 
Lindsay Howard Pettit 
Bruce Wane Hoar 
Prescott Richardson Burk 
Calvin Archie Cowen 
Craig Robert Meyer 
Mary Evelyn Toler 
Jennifer Levin 
Douglas Roy Kennedy 

Diane Frances Hankey 
Koren Kolligan 
Linda Diane Seeckts 

Frederick Clarke Winchell 
Katherine Halsey 
Deborah J. McKnight 



Raymond Patrick Fanara 



Felice S. & Josephine H. 
Rando 
Maurice E. L Virginia Shank 
Cameron S. & Nancy Thompson 
Nathaniel C. L Sareen H. 

Gerson 
Kenneth A. & Florence J. B. 

Liston 
Aldo G. L F. Claire Maselli 
James W. &. Edith L. Mar 
Robert L. &. Julie B.P. Pettit 
Norman W. &. Shirley E.M. Hoar 
George W. L Ruth D. Burk 
Rodney P. L Eleinor J.H. Cowei 
John R. &. Marjorie R. Meyer 
Albert W. L Louise C.O. Toler 
Alvin & Betty L. Levin 
John T. L Virginia E. T. 

Kennedy 
Francis W. L Edna J.B. Hankey 
Gregory S. L Zoe K. Kolligan 
E. William L Eleanor R. 

Seeckts 
Gordon D. &. Enid M.C. Winchei: 
William A. L Leila W. Halsey 
David B. & Eleanor J.F. 

McKnight 
Santo G. &. Theresa A. M. 

Fanara 



145 



March 


18 


March 


19 


March 


25 


March 


27 


April 


11 


April 


12 


April 


13 


April 


14 


April 


15 


April 


16 


April 


16 


April 


20 


April 


23 


April 


26 


April 


26 


April 


28 


May 3 




May 4 




May 5 




May 10 



VITAL STATISTICS 

Patricia Anne Calkins Charles W. L Martha A. H. 

Calkins 
Michael Paul Davidson Robert &. Cynthia C. Davidson 
Martha Beach Daniels Bruce G. L Janet B. Daniels 
Pamela Jean Ekberg Raymond P. L Margaret B. 

Ekberg 
David Clyde Ballou John D. L Janet L.H. Ballou 

Audrey Janet Butler Hector &. Audrey E.M. Butler 
Anita Sylvia Susanna Ervin I Othilia N. Barteky 

Barteky 
Timothy Dyer Martin Spencer F.,Jr. L Caroline S.F. 

Martin 
Margaret Weaver Jillson Robert F. &. Frances H. Jillson 
Elena Ruth Westcott Vernon C. L Mary A.C. Westcott 
Perry Duncan Nelson Duncan M. &. Jean R. Nelson 
Steven Eliot Lang Richard E. L Betty L.W. Lang 

Peter James Kramer Manuel L Ruth L. Kramer 

Baby Boy Wood Robert C. L Margaret B. Wood 

Kinard Ely Haden Russell L. &. Constance E. 

Haden 
Constance Pamela Flannery Ralph &. Constance H.M. Flannery 
Douglas Fairfield Davis Sherman P. L Phyllis M. Davis 
Joseph Henry Henderson Robert S. & Caroline G. 

Henderson 
Kenneth Walter Keyes Walter I. L Janet E.T. Keyes 
Jesse Worth Tucker Theodore W. &. Barbara J. H. 

Tucker 
May 12 Barbara Drew Vandell Robert F. & Margaret W. E. 

Vandell 
May 20 Audrey Lynn Kessel 
May 23 Baby Girl Selfridge 

May 25 Estelle Louise DiPerna 
May 26 Marcella Elizabeth 

Dickie 
May 26 Douglas Robertson Barker 

Barker 
Marianne Elisabeth Ingard Karl U. &, Doris C.K. Ingard 
Kathleen Doherty Edward J. &. Mary M.F. Doherty 

Kristin Burleigh Fernald George H. L Eleanor T. Fernald 
Russell Joseph Dixon II Russell J. L Theresa J.F. Dixon 
Linda Christine Legere Chester J. L Lillian T. M. 

Legere 
Michael Lewis Ciraso, Jr. Michael L. & Anne M.M. Ciraso 
Leigh Russell James D. &. Marguerite V. M. 

Russe 11 
July 8 Sally Melinda Murphy Frederick T.,Jr. &. Virginia 

C. C. Murphy 
Jacqueline Anne Smith John E. L Patricia A. P. Smith 
Peter Lyman Drury William II., Jr. L Mary L.C. 

Drury 
Jesse Reed Page Lot B. &. Patricia H. Page 

Elizabeth Ilaartz John C., Jr. &. Beatrice R. 

Haar t z 
Jane Marie Panetta James J. L Rosemary D. L. 

Panetta 
Henry Joseph Taillacq Henry &. Jean H. Taillacq 



146 



Joseph B. 


L Lesley J.C. Kessel 


Oliver G. 


L Claire A. G. 




Selfridge 


Paul P. L 


Viola S. DiPerna 


William R 


,1 . &. Julia E. G. 




Dickie 


William R 


. & Barbara E.S. 



June 


3 


June 


7 


June. 


19 


June 


20 


June 


20 


June 


20 


July 


8 



July 


9 


July 


10 


July 


13 


July 


17 


July 


17 


July 


20 



VITAL STATISTICS 



David MacLaren Hall 
Liam Michael Healy 
Mary Taussig Henderson 
Casey James Arnspiger 

Kathleen Marie Cook 
Sarah Ann Jennings 

Patricia Anne Campobasso 

William Stephen Crandall 

Paul Michael Ciraso 
Janet Elizabeth Morgan 

Hilary French 
David Dean Teabo 

Malcolm McDowell Carley 
Alan Harris Shansky 
Pamela Jane Murphy 



Nov. 28 Edward Allen McKay, Jr 



July 


24 


Aug. 


4 


Aug. 


24 


Aug. 


27 


Aug. 


29 


Sept 


. 10 


Sept 


. 11 


Sept 


. 13 


Sept 


, 16 


Sept 


. 25 


Oct. 


5 


Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


18 


Nov . 


13 


Nov . 


22 



Nov . 


29 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


20 



Carol Lee Osier 
Gerald Eckhardt 
Louisa May Striker 



Robert E. 
Edward M. 
Gerard C. 
Warren E. 

Harry L Ka 
Charles E. 

Joseph R. 

Stephen H. 

Edigio J. 
Winfield S 

John B. & 
Prince C. 

John A. L 
David &. Ne 
Edward W. 

Edward A. 

Howard L. 
Homer D. & 
William W. 



L Dorothy M.K. Hall 
& Helen M.T. Healy 
& Edith M. Henderson 
& Betty A.R. 

Arnspiger 
thleen G.M. Cook 
,11, L Ann L. V. 

Jennings 
&. Mary A. N. 

Campobasso 
L Patricia E.S. 
Crandall 
L Claire L.D. Ciraso 
. ,111 , &. Catherine 

L. R. Morgan 
Deborah C. French 
L Elizabeth F.P. 

Teabo 
Joan K. Carley 
ttie K. Shansky 
L Marjorie A.M. 

Murphy 
&. Carolyn R.P. 

McKay 
L Jane M.G. Osier 
Mary E.G. Eckhardt 
& Marjorie N.B. 
Striker 



Nov. 16 

Nov. 23 

Dec. 5 

Dec. 26 



Late Registrations 
Gregory Peter Faddoul George P 



Kelley Ann Davis 
Teresa Corrigan 
Holly Beth Flanders 



Natalie A. L. 
Faddoul 
Ronald C. & Barbara G. Davis 
Edward D. L Ellen N. Corrigan 
Charles C. & Lois A. Flanders 



147 



VITAL STATISTICS 
MARRIAGES 



Date of 
. Marriage 

1957 

Jan . 5 



Jan. 12 
Feb. 10 
March 2 3 
April 27 
May 4 
May 19 
May 2 7 
June 1 
June 15 
June 20 
June 21 
June 22 
June 23 
July 2 
July 8 
Aug. 18 



Names 



Residence 



Myron C. Hamer, Jr. 
Meredith H. Rollins 

John J. Rooney, Jr. 
Constance Blanche Harris 

William A. Jensen 
Mary F. Werner 

Richard M. Hill 
Cynthia Creelman 

John Andrew Coane 
Joanne Patricia Burke 

Richard L. Start 
De lores M. Day 

Charles Hubert Stephen 
Amy Iasigi Coit 

Howard Eugene Groom 
Suzanne L. Follansbee 

Edward J. Palmer, Jr. 
Sheila S. Moore 

Everett H. Heath 
Carla L. Wilson 

Francis Howes Gleason 
Nancy (Jackson) Peabody 

John Calvin Perkins 
Elizabeth Anne Bigelow 

Ronald Edson Darroch 
Mary Porter 

Robert Francis Shaw 
Josephine K. Park 

Howard Alan Minch 
Theresa Mary Emery 

James M. Flanlgan 
Elaine Finley 

James Joseph Scholz 
Dorothy Hildred Snelling 



Islington, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Winchester, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Somerville, Mass. 

London, Ontario, Canada 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
West Newton, Mass. 

Bemus Point, New York 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Montreal, Canada 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Arlington, California 
Burbank, California 

West Collingswood, N. J, 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Med ford, Mass. 
Lincoln , Mass . 

Newton, Mass. 
Dedham, Mass. 

Hampton, New Hampshire 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Weston, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Dorchester, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Keene, New Hampshire 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass. 

Purling, New York 
Lincoln, Mass. 



148 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Aug. 18 Richard Carmen Picazio 
Barbara Geane LeConti 

Aug. 23 Edward L. Worth 
Anna M. Johnston 

Sept. 7 Gunter Helnrlch Reinhard 

Kegel 
Brita Inga Maria Ahlnas 

Sept. 7 Richard Paul Russes 

Mary Diana Williamson 

Sept. 9 Robert L. Troupe 

Gladys Elaine McCarthy 

Sept. 20 Stanley James Adelstein 
Mary Charlesworth Taylor 

Oct. 12 Ernest Frederick Root 
Carolyn Anne McGinnis 

Oct. 19 Vincent Bernard Meade 
Marjorie Elaine Embree 

Oct. 20 Charles Chin-tse Yang 
Yula Tung-yu Lin 

Oct. 26 James Henry Pallotta 
Margaret Ann Gianninl 

Oct. 26 Frederic W.T. Rhinelander 
Nancy Crocker Powell 

Nov. 30 Richard Bowditch Paige 
Elizabeth Adams Jenney 

Dec. 28 Cornelius Robert Shea 
Mildred F. Johnson 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Watertown, Mas: 

Wakefield, Mas: 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Cambridge, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Acton, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Jacksonville, Florid* 
West Newton, Mass. 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Quincy, Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Brookline, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Dorchester, Mass. 



149 



Date 


of 


Death 


1957 


Jan. 


22 


Feb. 


10 


Feb. 


16 


March 8 


Mar oh 10 


March 20 


April 26 


April 27 


May 2 3 


May 30 


June 


6 


June 


12 


June 


29 


July 


2 


July 


3 


July 


21 


July 


23 


July 


26 


July 


27 


Aug. 


23 


Aug. 


14 


Sept 


, 20 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


28 


Oct. 


29 


Nov. 


2 


Dec. 


12 



VITAL STATISTICS 



DEATHS 



Age. 



Name Year Month Da: 



Alfred J. Buchan 68 5 11 

Harold Stearns Cousins 78 2 4 

Eugene Roswell Teabo 64 8 17 

Ruth Schirraer 67 6 7 

Joseph Theodore Remmes 47 - 

Minnie (Simpson) Crook 85 2 17 

Baby Boy Wood - 3 hours 

Nora Cunningham 82 - 

Baby Girl Selfridge 

Elisabeth (Davis) Eaton 

Abbie Caroline Smith 

Mary G. Miller 

Stephen Coburn Teabo 

David Whitcher Mann 

Fannie Rubinstein 

James Diamond 

Jessie P. Richardson 

Eliza Jane Tasker 

Mary E. (Martin) Giblin 

Michael Tulis 

Helen Bond (Cole) Tufts 

Angelo Cotoia 

Horace E. Beane 

Charles George Schirmer 

Baby Boy Marsh 3 hrs. 42 min 

Jeffrey David Frazier 

Douglas Spence 

William Allan Wilson 

Gerald Eckhardt 3 hrs. 35 min 



83 


3 


26 


91 


- 


- 


62 


5 


1 


2 


6 


6 


69 


9 


15 


70 


- 


- 


58 


1 


5 


79 


10 


2 


88 


7 


14 


88 


4 


5 


85 


8 


11 


71 


4 


1 


70 


- 


22 


87 


4 


24 


89 


5 


19 


- 


- 


3 hrs. 


79 


9 


1 


5 


8 


25 


44 


5 


9 


- 


- 


3 hrs. 



150 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1057 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Abbott, John A. L Diana B. $ 8,000 $ 544.00 

Adams, John Qulncy $ 250 17.00 

Adams, John Q. L Lucy D. 39,550 2,689.40 

Adams, Ramelle C. 18,100 1,230.80 

Adams, Thomas B. 100 6.80 

Adklns, Archibald W. L Dorothea 10,000 680.00 

Adler, Harold 18,750 1,275.00 

Adler, Ivy Ruth 1,500 102.00 

A'Hearn, Marian E. 3,150 214.20 

Albano Brothers 300 20.40 

Algeo, John T. L Catherine R. 5,500 374.00 

Algeo, Leo J. L Elaine T. 4,400 299.20 
Algeo, Margaret M. L 

Neville, Agnes M. 4,600 312.80 

Allen, Lyman & Nancy Clemens 1,000 68.00 

Allied Commonwealth Corporation 5,700 387.60 

American Legion 600 40.80 

Ammen, David L. L Judith B. 8,800 598.40 

Anderson, Carl L. L Ruth 5,800 394.40 

Anderson, Lawrence B. L Roslna DuP. 12,100 822.80 

Andrews, Paul R. L Catherine L. 2,300 156.40 

Angell, Craig W, L Carolyn G. 1,000 68.00 

Angelo, Caspar & Eda Polcari 16,600 1,128.80 

Appleby, Richard B. 4,500 306.00 

Aptt, Harry S. &. Etta E. 3,250 221.00 

Armstrong, Virginia 8,800 598.40 

Arnold, S. Leonard & Anna M. 4,500 306.00 

Ashworth, Harold T. L Irma D. 7,000 476.00 
Atchley, Dana W,, Jr. L 

Barbara Standlsh Payne 11,500 782.00 

Austin, Richard C. L Marcia W. 6,000 408.00 

Avery, Abigail D. 7,500 510.00 

Ayer, Richard B. b Constance M. 11,050 751.40 

Baggs, Arthur, Jr. k Marion S. 6,700 455.60 

Bailey, Richard B. I Rebecca B. 9,000 612.00 

Baker, John C. L Elizabeth E. 2,000 136.00 

Baldwin, William H. fc Agnes D. 500 34.00 

Ballentlne-Ober Market 1,250 85.00 

Baltrush, William C. L Sarah M. 3,300 224.40 

Barbarow, Ruth 1,650 112.20 

Barber, John W. , Jr. L Mary E. 4,700 319.60 

Bardsley, Theodore J. L Doris A. 2,620 178.16 

Barker, William R. L Barbara S. 3,800 258.40 

Barnaby, John M. I Charlotte B. 4,600 312.80 

Barr, Edgar E. L Olive H. 6,800 462.40 

Barrington, William D. & Barbara L. 5,300 360.40 

Barthel, Walter 100 6.80 

Barthel, Walter L Emma C. 5,450 370.60 

Beaton, Daniel R. L Shirley G. 7,000 476.00 

Belanger, Walter E. L Mary F. 7,400 503.20 

Bellizia, Francis E. L Mary H. 7,000 476.00 

151 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Benton, Carl R. & Barbara A. 

Bergen, Kenneth W. 

Bergquist, Walter J. &. Brlta M. 

Bernson, Bob L Edith J. 

Bertolaml, Leo 

Billings, Bruce H. L Sarah W. 

Billings, James B. L Marion 

Bingham, Elizabeth A. 

Bingham, Elizabeth P. B. 

Bingham, George C. 

Bishop, Fern W. 

Black, Everett A. L Anne E. 

Blacklow, Daniel J, L Charlotte 

Blais, George A. L Annette C. 

Blake, Charles H. & Helen L. 

Blakeley, Gerald W. , Jr. 

Boccadoro, Joseph L Ida 

Bockoven, J. Sanbourne 

Bockoven, J. Sanbourne & Dorothy 

Boehmer, Howard W. & Norma F. 

Bogner, Walter F. & Edith 

Bolt, Richard H. &. Katherlne L. 

Bolton, Geoffrey 

Bolton, Stanwood K. L Thalia H. 

Bonaceto, Anthony L Grace 

Bonia, Walter J. 

Booth, Alice Burrage 

Booth, Philip L Margaret I. 

Booth, Robert H. 

Borton, John E. L Joan A. 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. 

Boston Edison Company 

Boston l Maine Railroad 

Bowles, Clifford 

Bowles, William, Estate of 

Boyce, Manley B. 

Boyce, Manley B. & Alice M. 

Boyce, Mary M. 

Boyer, Edward 

Boyer, Edward L Angela V. 

Bradford, Robert L. L Martha A. 

Bradley, Clifford t Jeannette E. 

Bradshaw, Fred L Julia S. 

Brainard, Edward C., II i 

Elizabeth H. 
Braude, Stephen E. 1 Bettie J. 
Breed, Laura Post, Marsh, 

Margaret Breed L Paul Everhart 
Brennan, William L. L Eleanor A. 
Brewster, Ellen Beebe 
Briggs, Susan L. 
Brlsson, Norman 



100 



6.80 



50 


16,050 


1,094.80 




17,800 


1,210.40 




1,100 


74.80 




6,000 


408.00 




8,030 


546.04 




4,850 


329.80 




9,250 


629.00 




250 


17.00 




500 


34.00 




4,500 


306.00 




30,700 


2,087.60 




7,500 


510.00 




5,500 


374.00 




10,500 


714.00 




44,000 


2,992.00 




100 


6.80 


50 




3.40 




4,600 


312.80 




8,000 


544.00 




9,200 


625.60 




1,300 


88.40 




800 


54.40 




8,000 


544.00 




5,500 


374.00 




5,400 


367.20 




500 


34.00 




5,250 


357.00 




14,300 


972.40 




2,300 


156.40 


08,000 




6,664.00 


254,635 


2,100 


17,457.98 




900 


61.20 




6,500 


442.00 




4,000 


272.00 


500 




34.00 




17,500 


1,190.00 




4,500 


306.00 




3,800 


258. 40* 




700 


47.60 




5,800 


394.40 




2,880 


195.84 




5,000 


340.00 




5,000 


340.00 




8,200 


557.60 




7,075 


481.10 




6,000 


408.00 




50 


3.40 




1*3,500 


918.00 


200 




13.60 



152 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Mary D. 

& Katherine A, 



k Llla 
Doris L, 



Brisson, Norman F. & Evelyn W. 

Bronson, Franklin C. & Catherine 

Brooks, Albert S. 

Brooks, Paul $ 50 

Brown, Deborah Trull, David Trull, 

Alan Trull 
Brown, Elizabeth G. 

Brown, Polly F. 100 

Browne, Secor D. & 
Browning, Edgar C. 
Browning, George U, 
Brown's Wood, Inc. 
Buerger, Martin J. 
Bulkley, Joel B. & 
Burckett, Douglas M. L Phillippa C. 
Burgess, Catherine M. 
Burgess, Rebecca M. L Jeddrie, 

Mary M. 
Burk, George W. &. Ruth M. 
Burke, Edward J. & Helen V. 
Burke, Ruth Bemis 
Burns, Melvin P. 

Burns, William C. & Daisy May Day 
Burt, William F. L Donna G. 
Burton, William deK. & Priscilla 
Busfield, Gibson L. & Marilyn A. 
Butcher, Charles R. 
Butcher, Henry A., Jr. & Margaret 
Butcher, Ralph E. 
Butler, Hector & Audrey Edith 
Butler, William H. & Nancy G. 
Buttrick, David, Company 1,000 

Butts, F. Marsena L Louise M. 
Buxton, David &, Lois Pardee 
Bygrave, Robert & Lucy E. 

Calkins, Charles W. & Thelma E. 
Calkins, Charles W. , Jr. & 

Martha Anne 
Calkins, Ramona T. & Charles W. 
Callahan, Thomas R. 

Campobasso, Anthony B. & Dorothy M. 
Campobasso, Ethel 
Campobasso, Joseph R. 
Cannon, Bradford & Ellen DeN. 
Cannon, Ellen DeN. & Bradford 
Caras, Byron & Anastasia 
Caras, Ophair It Florence L. 
Carman, Eleanor Tarbell 
Carley, John A. & Joan Keir 
Carman, John W. 50 

Carney, Florence T. 



$ 2,100 
7,100 
5,400 
9,750 

200 
14,050 

7,000 
4,950 
5,500 
5,200 
10,600 
10,700 
7,600 
1,500 

3,250 
5,800 
4,500 

12,220 
3,600 
3,000 
7,000 
2,200 
6,000 
1,850 
2,100 
4,300 
3,250 
4,750 

10,100 
1,700 
6,000 
6,500 

5,800 

600 

2,700 

8,700 

3,100 

1,500 

1,800 

10,000 

22,100 

8,000 

6,000 

10,400 

5,500 

3,575 



142.80 
482.80 
367.20 
666.40 

13.60 
955.40 
6.80 
476.00 
336.60 
374.00 
353.60 
720.80 
727.60 
516.80 
102.00 

221.00 
394.40 
306.00 
830.96 
244.80 
204.00 
476.00 
149.60 
408.00 
125.80 
142.80 
292.40 
221.00 
323.00 
754.80 
115.60 
408.00 
442.00 

394.40 

40.80 
183.60 
591.60 
210.80 
102.00 
122.40 
680.00 
1,502.80 
544.00 
408.00 
707.20 
374.00 
3.40 
243.10 



153 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Carney, James J. L Agnes M. 

Carrlg, James A. 

Carstensen, Warren $ 150 

Carstensen, Warren L Evelyn G. 

Carty, James R. 

Caskey, Walter H. L Anna H. 

Cassidy, Henry J. & Verna E. 

Cassis, Anthony 

Catoia, Angelo &, Mary J. 

Catola, Anthony J. & Lucy M. A. 

Causer, William 0. &. Mary E. 

Chadwick, William & Jessie T. 

Chapin, Leslie M» , Jr. & Nancy E. 

Chapin, Louise B. & Bertha L. 

Chapin, Margaret E. 

Chapman, James S. & Emily M. 

Chapman, John W. & Elizabeth G. 

Chase, Theodore & Ames, James B. 

Chellis, Herbert N. b Eleanor M. 

Chiacchia, Alfred B. 

Chlotelis, Charles L. & Iasme J. 

Chipman, Robert Hennessy 

Chisholm, Edward C. & Margaret F. 

Chittick, Mary Gertrude & 

Suesens, Eleanor G. 
Church, Robert T. L Priscilla S. 
Churchill, Robert R. & June D. 
Cibel, Stanley A. &. Thelma W. 
Ciraso, Michael & Amelia 
Clare, Mary E. 
Clark, George A. 
Clark, Mary H. 
Clark, Vern & Vel 
Clark, William T. 
Clasby, Doris E. 
Clifford, Donald K. , Jr 
Coan, Thomas, Executor 
Coane, John H. , Jr. 
Coburn, Edward S. 
Codman, Dorothy S. F. M. 

Codman Estate 50 

Codman, Thomas N. , et al, Trs. 
Coffey, John B. L Wilma L. 
Cole, Edwin M. L Lucy F. 
Comstock, Joan B. 

Community Store 1,500 

Conant, Lily R. 
Conary, Frances P. 
Condit, Robert P. & Phyllis 
Conlin, James J. & Winifred 
Connair, John J. 
Connolly, J. Irving L Evelyn 



a M. 

L Catharine T. 

L Mary L. 



C. 
I. 



5 


,000 t 


! 340.00 


3 


,100 


210.80 
10.20 


19 


,900 


1,353.20 




500 


34.00 


7 


,500 


510.00 


4 


,350 


295.80 


7 


,700 


523.60 


3 


,100 


210.80 


2 


,850 


193.80 


3 


,300 


224.40 


6 


,000 


408.00 


6 


,500 


442.00 


11 


,500 


782.00 


3 


,500 


238.00 


4 


,775 


324.70 


7 


,100 


482.80 


12 


,500 


850.00 


4 


,500 


306.00 


1 


,600 


108.80 




500 


34.00 


5 


,000 


340.00 


5 


,100 


346.80 


7, 


500 


510.00 


11 


,100 


754.80 


5 


400 


367.20 


6 


300 


428.40 


3 


,650 


248.20 


7 


200 


489.60 


4 


100 


278.80 


20 


,700 


1,407.60 


5 


,500 


374.00 


13 


200 


897.60 


2 


,100 


142.80 


6 


,000 


408.00 


3 


350 


227.80 


2 


,900 


197.20 


6, 


,200 


421.60 


6 


,100 


414.80 
3.40 


61 


800 


4,202.40 


4 


500 


306.00 


H« 


200 


761.60 


7 


350 


499.80 
102.00 


9 


,000 


612.00 


4 


,500 


306.00 


5 


,000 


340.00 


4 


100 


278.80 


3 


,100 


210.80 


1 


,900 


129.20 



154 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Conroy, John L. L Grace W. 

Constantino, Philip J. 

Conti, Bartolomeo B. 

Cook Brothers 

Cook, Celia M. 

Cook, John F. L Ethel A. 

Cook, Harry & Kathleen G. 

Cook, Paul W., Jr. L Marian M. 

Coolidge, Henry P. & Alice C. 

Cope, Oliver & Alice DeN. 

Cormey, Henry J. & Illione W. 

Comrie, Charlotte G. &. Howard F, 

Corrigan, Edward D. 

Corrigan, Leo W. 

Corrigan, Martin 

Corrigan, Mary 

Corrigan, Mary K. 

Costello, John D. 

Costello, William H. 

Cotoni, Carolana M. 

Cousins, Ashley B. 

Cousins, Harold S. 

Cousins, Laurence B. & Jeanne B, 

Cousins, Willis N. 

Cowen, Rodney P. &, Eleinor 

Cowles, Addison & Alexandra C. 

Crandall, Stephen H. & Patricia 

Crane, Charles E. 

Crane, Charles E, & Hazel G. 

Crawford, Dorothy B. 

Crawford, John D. & Joanna W. 

Creelman, Gilmore B. & Alice M. 

Crockett, Alan D. & Judith D. 

Croft, Robert 

Crook, Constance S. 

Crowson, Leslie W. & Madeline W, 

Culver, Perry J. 

Culver, Perry J. L Kate S. 

Cunningham, George E. 

Cunningham, Harold L. & Corrine 

Cunningham, J. Lewis L Ruth P. 

Cunningham, Robert M. 

Cushing, Gustave 



400 



Dadmun, Harrie H, 
Dahl, Thyra 
Dalzell, Richard W 
Damico, Louise 
Daniels, Bruce G. 
Danosky, Edward A. 
Danosky, Edward A. 
Danosky, Stefania 



& Helena 
, L Jeanne B 

L Mary C. 



50 



50 



1,000 



3,850 
6,500 
6,750 

8,700 
500 
5,250 
6,500 
7,400 
9,050 
2,400 
500 
3,500 
3,300 
2,400 
7,000 
1,500 
100 
1,700 
4,600 
2,400 
8,000 
6,100 
4,450 
4,600 
5,150 
5,750 

14,750 
6,000 
5,500 
3,550 
6,000 
200 
3,000 
6,800 

19,000 
4,300 
3,600 
4,750 
3,900 
4,000 

12,100 
5,800 
7,700 
4,600 

13,400 

500 

6,700 

9,650 



261.80 
442.00 
459.00 

27.20 
591.60 

34.00 
357.00 
442.00 
503.20 
615.40 
163.20 

34.00 
238.00 
224.40 
163.20 
476.00 
102.00 
6.80 
115.60 
312.80 
163.20 
544.00 
414.80 
302.60 
312.80 
350.20 
391.00 
3.40 
1,003.00 
408.00 
374.00 
241.40 
408.00 

13.60 
204.00 
462.40 
3.40 
1,292.00 
292.40 
244.80 
323.00 
265.20 
272.00 

822.80 
394.40 
523.60 
312.80 
911.20 
34.00 
455.60 
724.20 



155 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



D'Arrlgo Bros. Co. of Mass. 

Davis, Alfred M. $ 1,250 

Davis, D. Bradford L Barbara G. 

Davis, Prescott L. 

Davis, Ronald C. L Barbara C. 

Davis, Saville R. & Anita V. 

Davis, Sherman P. 

Davis, William H. 

Davison, Archibald T. L Alice P. 

Day, Delnar L. L Anna M. 

Dean, Emma W. 

Dean, Louis W, 

Dean, William M. 

Dean, William M. L Lorraine C. 

Dee, Helena A. 

DeFord, William L Elinor S. 

DeMone, Harold W. L Elsie R. 

Denehy, Edward J. L Bernadette J. 

Denlo, F. Winchester 

DeNormandie, Alice W. 

DeNormandie, James 

DeNormandie, James L Martha 

DeNormandie, James L Robert L. 

DeNormandie, Robert L. , Estate of 

DePavlo 

Dewey, Davis R. , II 

Dewey, Edward & Zella T. 

Dexter, Charles L Charlotte 

Diamond, James H. 

Dickie, Richard I. L Julia G. 

DlGiovanni, Anthony 100 

DiGlovannl, Antonio L Jean 

DiPerna, John F. , Nicola, Anthony J., 

Marcello, and Ferrante, Charles 
DiPerna, Paul P. L Viola F. 
Dixon, Russell J. L Theresa J. 
Dodge, Orien B. 

Doherty, Edward J. L Finn, Mary M. 
Doherty, Mary E. , Margaret A., 

Marjorie 
Doherty, Matthew H. 1,300 

Doherty, Matthew H. L Elizabeth H. 
Domenlchella, Dominic 

Domenlchella, Frank 300 

Domenlchella, Frank L Mattle M. 
Donaldson, Estate of Charlotte H. 
Donaldson, Gordon 50 

Donaldson, Gordon A. k Elizabeth A. 
Donaldson, Malcolm L. 
Donaldson, Robert D. 
Donaldson, Robert D. , Jr. 
Donnelly, Bernard F. I Josephine 



$ 2,720 


$ 184.96 


4,750 


408.00 


10,200 


693.60 


9,100 


618.80 


6,200 


421.60 


7,500 


510.00 


4,000 


272.00 


4,300 


292.40 


13,000 


884.00 


13,800 


938.40 


3,200 


217.60 


5,300 


360.40 


1,000 


68.00 


3,900 


265.20 


2,300 


156.40 


7,100 


482.80 


19,900 


1,353.20 


11,900 


809.20 


3,500 


238.00 


18,900 


1,285.20 


3,520 


239.36 


23,700 


1,611.60 


22,830 


1,552.44 


7,625 


518.50 


700 


47.60 


16,700 


1,135.60 


3,200 


217.60 


5,000 


340.00 


1,400 


95.20 


5,000 


340.00 




6.80 


5,750 


391.00 


6,000 


408.00 


5,000 


340.00 


4,500 


306.00 


2,850 


193.80 


4,700 


319.60 


2,000 


136.00 




88.40 


13,900 


945.20 


500 


34.00 




20.40 


6,040 


411.40 


8,000 


544.00 




3.40 


8,500 


578.00 


8,250 


561.00 


67,600 


4,596.80 


4,700 


319.60 


1,500 


102.00 



156 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



Dorian, New art 

Dougherty, Dennis M. 

Dougherty, Andrew J. 

Douglass, Martha K. 

Downing, Grace L. 

Drake, Lillian W. L Garmory, 

Bertha V. 
Dresser, Charles N. &. Ruth C. 
DuBols, Anson M. L Olive S. 
DuBois, Eliot L Barbara 
Durnan, John P. L Leona E. 
Dustin, Daniel E. L Rachel S. 

East, Edla A. 

Eaton, Gertrude S. 

Eckhardt, Homer D. L Mary G. 

Edgell, Henry W. 

Ehlert, Caroline E. 

Elliott, Robert H. L Ethel M. 

Emmons, A. Bradlee L Judith Reed 

England, Albert E. k Priscilla S. 

Ennis, Walter M. , Jr. L Barbara R 

Eppling, Frederic J. L Sarah J. 

Ericson, Herbert E. k Erlyne R. 

Erickson, Leonard V. L Martha F. 

Evans, Lucius W. k Virginia C. 

Faddoul, George P. & Natalie A. 

Fahringer, Gerald S. L Joan L. 

Fanara, Santo G. 

Faran, James J. & 

Farley, Louis C. , 

Farrar, Edith B. 

Faunce, Mary Gill & Anthony 

Fedock, Metro I Hazel A. 

Fell, Florence C. 

Fernald, George H. I Eleanor T. 

Fillmore, Bruce R. & Eleanor L. 

Fineslnger, Abraham L. & Nina W. 

Finnerty, James L. L Anna C, 

Fiorelli, Ernest R. L Rose M. 

Fisher, John W. 

Fitts, Charles K. L Gertrude W. 

Flanagan, James k Wilhelmina G. 

Flannery, Donald J. L Harriet E. 

Flannlgan, John P. & Marion E. 

Fleck, Richard C. L Frances R. 

Fleming, Clifford D. L E. Frances 

Fletcher, Walter B. k Helen F. 

Flewelling, Roy S. L Thelma G. 

Flint, Edith F. 

Flint, George B. L Lucie S. 



Ellen G. 

Jr. L Isabel K, 



1,000 



$ 3,750 $ 
3,600 
6,350 
5,750 
5,000 

5,250 
5,600 
5,100 
4,800 
6,200 
6,500 

5,500 

7,500 

7,000 
14,950 
10,775 

5,450 

8,000 
14,000 

9,800 

6,000 

9,500 

5,000 
16,500 

7,000 

6,000 

5,500 

9,020 

8,600 

100 

11,200 

2,650 

5,400 

6,000 

4,650 
600 

4,650 

3,900 

6,700 

16,500 

700 

2,200 

7,300 
10,600 

8,700 

6,750 

7,100 

1,000 

4,900 



255.00 
244.80 
431.80 
391.00 
340.00 

357.00 
380.80 
346.80 
326.40 
421.60 
442.00 

374.00 
510.00 
476.00 

1,016.60 
732.70 
370.60 
544.00 
952.00 
666.40 
408.00 
646.00 
340.00 

1,122.00 

476.00 
408.00 
442.00 
613.36 
584.80 
6.80 
761.60 
180.20 
367.20 
408.00 
316.20 

40.80 

316.20 

265.20 

455.60 

1,122.00 

47.60 
149.60 
496.40 
720.80 
591.60 
459.00 
482.80 

68.00 
333.20 



157 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Name of Taxpayer Estate 



Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Real and 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 11,000 


$ 748.00 


13,600 


924.80 


4,500 


306.00 


400 


27.20 


8,700 


591.60 


2,950 


200.60 


8,750 


595.00 


5,500 


374.00 


5,500 


374.00 


5,500 


374.00 


6,000 


408.00 


7,000 


476.00 


500 


34.00 


5,500 


374.00 


5,000 


340.00 


9,300 


632.40 


6,200 


421.60 


9,200 


625.60 


5,000 


340.00 


2,500 


170.00 


6,200 


421.60 


7,800 


530.40 


8,000 


544.00 


6,000 


408.00 


4,200 


285.60 


7,000 


476.00 


6,630 


450.84 


4,500 


306.00 


2,500 


170.00 


2,500 


170.00 




81.60 


11,650 


792.20 


7,300 


496.40 


12,000 


818.00 


10,000 


680.00 


19,100 


1,298.80 


18,300 


1,244.40 


4,200 


285.60 


4,500 


306.00 


11,000 


748.00 


2,000 


136.00 


4,000 


272.00 


3,710 


252.28 


7,600 


527.00 


2,900 


197.20 


11,700 


795.60 


5,200 


353.60 


19,100 


1,298.80 


9,500 


646.00 


9,200 


625.60 


6,500 


442.00 



Flint, Josephine R. 

Flint, Warren F. 

Floyd, Olive B. 

Flynn, Frank J. 

Flynn, Helen C. 

Foley, Harold F. ft Rita E. 

Fol«y, Harold W. 

Forbes, Sherman H. ft Annabell 0. 

Forsberg, Ragner W. ft Ingrid E. 

Foulke, Howard V. 

Foust, James L. ft Dorothy B. 

Fradd, Norman W. ft Alberta A. 

Frazler, Joseph G. ft Harriet E. 

Freeman, David F. ft Constance C. 

Fryatt, Thomas F. 

Fuller, Ernest L. ft Doris 0. 

Fullerton, Albert L. , Jr. & Mary S. 

Gagne, Lawrence E. ft Dorothy Q. 

Gajewski, Ceslaus A. ft. Sophie 

Garland, Joseph ft Mira C. 

Garrison, David L. & Alice E. 

Garrison, John B. ft Barbara F. 

Gary, John E. ft Maida F. 

Gerson, Nathaniel C. ft Sareen R. 

Gertz, George L. ft Edith A. 

Gibbs, Norman E. ft Emma M. 

Giblin, Mary E. ft Ruth E. 

Gilbert, George H. ft Rebecca A. 

Gilbert, John W. ft Josephine L. 

Gilbert, Mary J. 

Gilbert ft Polhamus 1,200 

Giles, Edmund W. ft Muriel H. 

Giles, Thomas T. ft Stella A. 

Gllfoy, Donald A. ft Helen B. 

Giurleo, James M. ft Mary C. 

Glazier, L. Gordon ft Gertrude 

Goodwin, Herbert F. ft Elizabeth D. 

Gordon, Marie C. 

Gounarls, Thomas X. ft Jean G. 

Grablll, Elliott V. ft Martha L. 

Graf, Malcolm 

Gras, Ranulf W. ft Annette E. 

Grason, Rufus L. ft Edna B. 

Gray, Robert W. 150 

Greaves, Allan W. ft Theresa D. 

Greene, Frederick H. , Jr. ft Helen H. 

Greenewalt, David ft Katharine R. 

Greer, Frederick W. ft Eleanor F. 

Gregg, Earl F. ft Doris H. 

Griffin, Allen A. ft Ruth W. 

Griffin, Harriet S. 



158 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Grim, William M. , Jr. L Barbara M. 
Grinnell, William L. L Virginia B. 
Gropius, Walter & Use 
Gross, T. A. 0. & Judith C. F. 
Grover, C. Stuart &. Gunilda G. 
Gunaris, Theodore & Rheta D. 
Gustafson, Craig S. &. Louise M. 
Gustafson, Edwin Anton L Doris M. 

Haartz, John C, Jr. & Beatrice R. 

Haden, Russell L. , Jr. 

Haden, Russell L. , Jr. & Constance 

Hagenian, Joseph C. &. Irene R. 

Hagerty, Julia C. 

Hagmann, Otto 

Hagmann, Otto &. Katherine 

Hale, Hazen G. , Jr. &. Gail Robinson 

Haley, Arthur E. 

Hall, Cecil E. & Nancy E. 

Hall, Henry P. & Barbara G. 

Hall, Thomas C. & Mary M. 

Halsey, William A. & Leila W. 

Hamilton, Harry A. & Bessie E. 

Hammond, Gertrude M. 

Hankey, Francis W. & Edna J. 

Hanlon, Albert W. 

Hanneraan, Roger W. & Marion N. 

Hanson, Adler M. & Madeline A. 

Hanson, August R. H. L Evelyn L. M. 

Hapgood, Norman, Jr. & Ruth K. 

Harding, Catherine, Estate of 

Hardy, Harriet L. 

Harling, Ernest J. & Marion A. 

Haroian, Henry & Jessie S. 

Harrington, F. Frank, Estate of 

Harrington, Winthrop W. 

Harris, John N. & Naomi A. 

Harrison, George R. &. Florence K. 

Hart, Frederick R. 

Hart, Joseph S. 

Hart, William E. &. Isabella C. 

Hartman, Henry F. 

Haworth, George G. & Thelma E. 

Hayden, Nellie B. , Estate of 

Healey, Edward M. &, Helen T. 

Harry, Healey R., Jr. & Jeanne C. 

Heavens, K. Bardwell & Suzanne M. 

Heck, Mary Higbee 

Hedge, Mary A. 

Helburn, Peter &. Margaret 

Held, Arnold E. & Mary A. 

Hellman, Maurice H. & Dolores T. 



50 



3. 


500 


$ 238.00 


9, 


000 


612.00 


14. 


500 


986.00 


5, 


300 


360.40 


7, 


000 


476.00 


5. 


000 


340.00 


7, 


000 


476.00 


4, 


500 


306.00 


10 


600 


720.80 
3.40 


Hi 


650 


792.20 


4 


300 


292.40 


3 


000 


204.00 


3 


850 


261.80 


5 


000 


340.00 


1 


400 


95.20 


1 


500 


102.00 


7 


000 


476.00 


6 


000 


408.00 


5 


500 


374.00 


6 


000 


408.00 


4 


,300 


292.40 


4 


600 


312.80 


7 


,450 


506.60 


5 


,000 


340.00 


6 


000 


408.00 


9 


,600 


652.80 


8 


,100 


550.80 


2 


,950 


200.60 


2 


,500 


170.00 


6 


,600 


448.80 


4 


,500 


306.00 




500 


34.00 


1 


,750 


119.00 


4 


,400 


299.20 


1 


,000 


68.00 


1 


,600 


108.80 




200 


13.60 


1 


,000 


68.00 


9 


,000 


612.00 


3 


,700 


251.60 


6 


,000 


408.00 




300 


20.40 


7 


,000 


476.00 


5 


,700 


387.60 


5 


,000 


340.00 


33 


,600 


2,284.80 


10 


,500 


714.00 


1 


,850 


125.80 


4 


,200 


285.60 


1 


,100 


74.80 



159 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 
Estate 



Henderson, Gerard C. L Edith M. 

Henderson, Mary S. 

Henderson, Robert S. & Carolyn H. 

Henley, Merrill J. &. Ida H. 

Hennessy, Frank J., Jr. L Pauline G 

Henry, Hall M. & Addie McAllister 

Herlihy, Maurice K. & Jean E. 

Herman, Edwards W. 

Herthel, Stephen W. & Evelyn S. 

Hess, John L. & Barbara L. 

Hess, Kenneth W. L Alice B. 

Hester, Leon B. & Mary B. 

Hill, Jacques A. F. 

Hill, Walter L. &. Patricia C. 

Hinds, Edward H. & Edith M. 

Hoar, George W. & Norman W. 

Holbrow, Frederick L Florence G. 

Holdsworth, Dennis William &, Vega 

Holland, Taffy K. 

Hollingsworth, Lowell M. & Florence 

Hoover, Henry B. & Lucretia J. 

Houghton, John J. &, Lillian 

Howard, Elizabeth F. 

Howard, Esther T. 

Hoyt, Harrison & Shirley J. 

Hubbard, Eliot, Jr. 

Hulten, Thure 

Humphreys, J. Robert & M. Lillian 

Hunsaker, Jerome C. , Jr. 

Hunt, Hope 

Hunt, Lewi 8 E. 

Hunt, Pearson 

Hunt, Pearson &, Merrill T. 

Huntley, George F. & Lottie D. 

Huntley, Medford E. L Blanche L. 

Huntley, Oland F. i. Alberta T. 

Hurd, Joseph L Nellie M. 

Hurd, Nancy Ddbney 

Hurff, Joseph L. L Elizabeth C. 

Hyde, Benjamin D. &. Mildred B. 

Iantosca, Frank 0. &. Mary L. 
Ingard, K. Uno L Doris C. 
Irwin, Mary M. 

Jackson, Dorothy W. 

Jackson, Gardner, Jr. &. Sallie 

Jacobs, May L. 

Jagger, James M. &. Miriam H. 

James, Hamilton R. & Waleska E. 

Janes, G. Sargent & Ann B. 

Jaroch, Ellen G. L Tufts, Elizabeth 



6 


600 


$ 448.80 


6, 


400 


435.20 


5. 


000 


340.00 


4 


500 


306.00 


5, 


500 


374.00 


10 


000 


680.00 


3 . 


300 


224.40 


12, 


200 


829.60 


13, 


650 


928.20 


1, 


000 


68.00 


9 


500 


646.00 


5, 


000 


340.00 


1, 


000 


68.00 


6, 


300 


428.40 




100 


6.80 


9| 


500 


646.00 


5. 


500 


374.00 


6 


500 


442.00 


6 i 


000 


408.00 


7 


000 


476.00 


7, 


300 


496.40 


3 


800 


258.40 


2, 


000 


136.00 


10 


300 


700.40 


5 . 


500 


374.00 


9 


100 


618.80 


4 


100 


278.80 


3 


900 


265.20 


19, 


250 


1,309.00 


1, 


700 


115.60 


3, 


600 


244.80 




400 


27.20 


10, 


600 


720.80 


4 


350 


295.80 


3 . 


600 


244.80 


3, 


000 


204.00 


11. 


050 


751.40 


9. 


100 


618.80 


8, 


600 


584.80 


8, 


500 


578.00 


5, 


500 


374.00 


5, 


600 


380.80 


13, 


500 


918.00 


12 


000 


816.00 


6 


600 


448.80 


15 


000 


1,020.00 


6 


,750 


459.00 


6 


500 


442.00 


1 


,100 


74.80 


4 


,200 


285.60 



160 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Jenney, Charles J. & Katrina C. 
Jenney, Phyllis M. 
Jensen, Holgar J. & Grace A. 
Jensen, Olin A. & Agnes E. 
Jillson, Robert F. L Frances H. 
Johansen, Rose May 
John, DeWitt L Morley M. 
Johnson, Ernest L. & Grace M. 
JohnBon, Fern A., Estate of 
Johnson, John W, &, Josephine 
Johnson, Madeline 
Johnson, Winston H. & Dorothy L. 
Jones, Ira M. & Katherine A. 
Jozwicki, Alfons & Adeline C. 

Kane, Henry B. & Elizabeth C. 

Kasperian, Karl D. & Carol 0. 

Keene, Clifton R. & Virginia L. 

Keily, Delbar P. & Gertrude E. 

Kelzer, Harold 

Kelliher, John J., Estate of 

Kennedy, Albert E. 

Kennedy Brothers 

Kennedy, John T. & Albert E. 

Kenney, Robert James & Jean E. 

Kent, Harold E. & Muriel B. 

Kessel, Joseph B. & Lesley J. 

Keuper, Charles S. & Elinors W. 

Keyes, Janet T. 

Kidder, George H. 

Kindleberger, Charles P. & Sarah M. 

King, William T. 

Kingsbury, Roy S. & Ann B. 

Kinney, Robert C. 

Kinney, Robert C. & Alice G. 

Kinsler, Herman F. & Louise M. 

Kirkpatrick, David W. &, Margaret M. 

Kistiakowsky, George B. & Irma E. 

Kjellander, Joel & Mary C. 

Kling, John W. L Louise H. 

H. B. Knowles, Inc. 

Harry B. Knowles, Jr. 

Knowles, Wilma E. 

Kolllgan, Gregory Scott &, Zoe 

Kolyshkin, Lena 

Kopp, Jay F. & Marilyn J. 

Korhonen, Edwin J. &. Onerva M. 

Kramer, Manuel & Ruth L. 

Kubik, Charles S. L Emily K. 

Lahey, Heirs of James 
Lahnstein, Karl F. 



500 



2,150 
50 



$ 5,500 
8,500 
3,100 
5,100 
4,600 
1,500 
7,550 
12,000 
3,000 
150 
5,600 
4,300 
2,100 
5,500 

3,750 
1,000 
5,000 
4,200 
1,100 
3,200 
5,800 

150 
6,500 
6,000 
6,500 

12,500 
4,500 
6,500 
5,450 

15,700 
8,505 
2,000 
130 
7,750 
5,000 

11,700 
7,500 
4,500 
9,700 

5,000 
6,000 
3,030 
10,700 
5,500 
3,000 
6,000 

1,500 
3,400 



374.00 
578.00 
210.80 
346.80 
312.80 
102.00 
513.40 
816.00 
204.00 
10.20 
380.80 
292.40 
142.80 
374.00 

255.00 

68.00 

340.00 

285.60 

74.80 

217.60 

394.40 

34.00 

10.20 

442.00 

408.00 

442.00 

850.00 

306.00 

442.00 

370.60 

1,067.60 

578.34 

136.00 

8.84 

527.00 

340.00 

795.60 

510.00 

306.00 

805.80 

3.40 

340.00 

408.00 

206.04 

727.60 

374.00 

204.00 

408.00 

102.00 
231.20 



161 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 19 57 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Name of Taxpayer Estate Estate Estate 



Light, Galen D. , Jr. & Lois McC. 6,000 

Lillie, Douglas G. & Hilda F. 13,200 



340.00 



401.20 
306.00 
309.40 



Lancashire, George F. &, Dorothy C. $ 5,000 

Lang, Richard E. & Betty Lee 5,000 340.00 

Langton, William G. & Jane Gillson 7,000 476.00 

Lankhorst, Beverly P. 6,000 408.00 

Larrabee, Leonard C. &, Peggy S. 5,900 

Larson, John B. & Mafalda M. 4,500 

Larzelere, William & Alice J. 4,550 

Lavrakas, Fofo 2,150 146.20 

Lawrence, David B. &. Priscilla M. 8,200 557.60 

Lawrence, Lincoln C. &, Blanche P. 4,750 323.00 

Lawson, Harold E. 700 7,750 574.60 

Leathern, Ernest F. & Evelyn K. 29,200 1,985.60 

Leavitt, Donald P. b Christine P. 9,000 612.00 

LeBlanc, Alphonse J. & Alice M. 2,500 170.00 

Lee, Joseph D. & Barbara B. 6,500 442.00 

Lee, Shih Ying &, May C. 1,000 68.00 

Leger, Mary E. 3,850 261.80 

884.00 
193.80 
258.40 



Lemander, William C. &. Emily K. 13,000 

LeMann, John 2,8 50 

Lennon, James V. &. Elin 3,800 

Leslie Farm, Inc. 300 1,800 142.80 

Leslie, Maurice A. & Annie 3,500 238.00 



Leslie, Paul M. &. Elizabeth M. 4,750 323.00 

Levin, Alvin &. Betty 4,600 312.80 

Li, Yao T. & Nancy T. 1,000 68.00 

Liddick, Harold S. &, Virginia D. 6,700 455.60 

408.00 
897.60 

Lincoln Auto Service, Inc. 1,000 68.00 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 250 17.00 

Lincoln, John W. &. Clarinda Y. 6,500 442.00 

Lincoln Plumbing &, Heating Co. 200 13.60 

Lindsay, Nicholas 500 34.00 

Linstrom, Peter J. &. Maybelle L. 5,000 340.00 

Litte, Rudolph 7,600 516.80 

Livengood, Eleanor C. H. 3,800 258.40 

Loader, Frederick H. & Dorothy C. 8,500 578.00 

Loesel, Robert A. & Marybell 5,000 340.00 

Loewenstein, Paul & Sophie 8,500 578.00 

Loomis, David &, Paulette C. 6,500 442.00 

Lorrey, Mildred J. 5,275 358.70 

Lothrop, John W. L Ellen D. 1,300 88.40 

Loud, John F. &, Mary L. 10,000 680.00 

Loveys, Donald C. &, Harriet E. 8,000 544.00 

Lummus, John W. &. Ann A. 5,250 357.00 

Lunt, Heirs of Charles 2,600 176.80 

Lustwerk, Ferdinand 5,750 391.00 

Lutnicki, Victor A. 50 3.40 

Lutnicki, Victor A. & Harriet H. 12,100 822.80 

Lynch, Edward H. &. Madeline M. 3,600 244.80 

Lyon, Richard M. L Ann M. 3,100 210.80 

Lyon, Ruth 3,300 224.40 

162 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Lyon, Ruth 

Lyons, John J. & Ann V. 

Lyons, Martin & Winifred A. 

MacDonald, Everett A. & Ethel W. 

MacFarland, Charles C. L Phyllis M. 

Maclnnis, Daniel A., Jr. &, Francis C, 

Mackenzie, Roland C. 

Maclaurin, Richard Colin L Ellen 

Maclaurin, W. Rupert &, Elfriede C. 

MacLean, Heirs of Hector J. 

MacLeod, Edward & Hester M. 

MacLeod, Edward, Jr. & Mary M. 

MacLeod, Frederick H. 

MacRae, Manning W. & Nina W. 

Mahan, Russell P. & Anastasia 

Maher, Raymond & Gertrude M. 

Maher, Raymond Jay & Adeline 

Mahoney, Gerald J. & Jeanne M. 

Mallett, Herbert A. &, Eva M. 

Malloy, Robert M. &. Irene C. 

Malone, Charles 

Mann, David W. 

Mann, David W. , Inc. 

Mannarino, Heirs of Anna 

Manning, Joseph J. & Catherine L. 

Manzelli, John & Dorothy 

Mar, James W. & Edith 

Marchetti, John W. &, Sarah G. 

Maroni, Robert F. & Valentine R. 

Martin, Fred & Marie 

Martin, John 0. & Candida W. 

Martin, Spencer F. , Jr. & Caroline F, 

Martini, William F. L Virginia J. 

Mascari, Leonard E. &. Grace B. 

Maselli, Aldo G. &. F. Claire 

Mason, Hayden &, Jean C. 

Mason, Max, Jr. & Betty M. 

Maxner, James 0. &. Dorothy R. 

McClennen, Alan & Louise H. 

McCune, William J. & Elizabeth 

McDonald, Claire 

McHugh, Katharine 

McHugh, Mary F. 

McKay, Edward A. 

McKennan, William & Alice W. 

McKnight, Wilraot & Katherine E. 

McKnight, David B. & Eleanor J. 

McKnight, Ernest Tilley 

McLellan, John W. 

McMillin, James B. 

McMurtry, George G. & Rose Mary 





400 


$ 27.20 


4 


,450 


302.60 


3 


330 


226.44 


9 


,200 


625.60 


4 


,550 


309.40 


3 


,000 


204.00 


12 


,000 


816.00 


11 


,200 


761.60 


14 


,300 


972.40 


4 


,350 


295.80 


2 


,850 


193.80 


1 


,100 


74.80 




600 


40.80 


5 


,500 


374.00 


8 


,000 


544.00 


2 


,800 


190.40 


2 


,400 


163.20 


6 


,000 


408.00 


2 


,600 


176.80 


10 


,000 


680.00 


1 


,300 


88.40 


11 


,200 


761.60 


11 


,700 


795.60 


2 


,300 


156.40 


4 


,700 


319.60 


5 


,200 


353.60 


5 


,300 


360.40 


9 


,200 


625.60 


14 


,150 


972.40 


5 


,000 


340.00 


4 


,500 


306.00 


5 


,000 


340.00 


8 


000 


544.00 


13 


000 


884.00 


6 


000 


408.00 


4 


700 


319.60 


4 


800 


326.40 


5 


500 


374.00 


12. 


750 


867.00 


9. 


500 


646.00 


5, 


000 


340.00 




500 


34.00 


6, 


000 


408.00 


4, 


500 


306.00 


9| 


000 


612.00 


4, 


200 


285.60 


4, 


200 


285.60 




400 


27.20 


3| 


250 


221.00 


4, 


100 


278.80 




500 


34.00 



163 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Meade, Edmund J. fit Eleanor H. $ 3,500 $ 238,00 

Meade, Varnum R. fit Janice H. 6,000 408.00 

Meiss, Millard. & Margaret L. 10,400 707.20 

Melanson, Leonard J. & Mary 4,000 272.00 

Melllsh, Eugene D. fit Nancy 4,600 312.80 

Menna, Andrew Q. fit Frances 4,100 278.80 

Merrill, Vincent N. fit Anne S. 5,000 340.00 

Meriam, Richard S. fit Alice G. 12,350 839.80 

Messina, Jaspare & Grazia 4,400 299.20 

Meyer, Robert V. & Eugenia S. 5,800 394.40 

Meyer, John R., Jr. & Marjorie R. 6,500 442.00 

Militzer, Raymond E. fit Martha B. 18,000 1,224.00 

Millar, Philip N. fit Winifred M. 2,600 176.80 

Miller, Albert L. 9,420 640.56 

Miller, Henry D. & Mary E. 8,300 564.40 

Miller, Mary G. 5,500 374.00 

Mills, Cecil R. & Lillian M. 3,650 248.20 

Mix, Thomas R. fit Helen B. 4,800 326.40 

Mixon, Scott I. & Isabel 9,000 612.00 

Molina, Henry J., Jr. & Edith D. 8,800 598.40 

Monks, Ann S. 50 3.40 

Monks, John P. fit Ann S. . 48,000 3,264.00 

Moody, Charles P. fit Josephine C. 7,100 482.80 

Moor, Edgar J. fit Joan K. 10,550 717.40 

Moore, Herbert L. , Jr. & Sylvia W. 10,000 680.00 

Moore, Lawrence 100 6.80 

Moore, Lawrence & Eleanor 12,700 863.60 

Moore, Robert L. fit Dorothy H. 9,000 612.00 

Morette, Walter J. & Gertrude C. 4,750 323.00 

Morey, Kenneth & Ruth I. 4,500 306.00 

Morgan, Henry M. & Gwen G. 8,500 578.00 

Morgan, Richard S. &, Molly H. 6,500 442.00 

Morningside, Inc. 38,500 2,618.00 

Morgan, Winfield S. fit Catherine R. 10,040 682.72 

Morris, Milliage 60 4.08 

Morris, Milliage E. fit Beatrice M. 2,500 170.00 

Morris, Robert E. F. fit Clara D. 3,700 251.60 

Morris, Robert H. fit Irene S. 4,500 306.00 

Morriss, Benham E. fit Ardis G. 5,500 374.00 

Morse, Thomas R. 16,100 1,094.80 

Morse, William H. fit Marguerite D. 3,250 221.00 

Moses, John P. fit Alice W. 6,500 442.00 

Moss, Leonard G. fit Frances S. 2,600 176.80 

Mukhitarian, Samuel fit Stephanie 4,050 275.40 

Murphy, Bridget 4,500 306.00 

Murphy, Cyrus W. & Persis S. 4,900 333.20 

Murphy, Daniel J. fit Louise C. 4,550 309.40 

Murphy, Edward W. 4,750 323.00 

Murphy, Mina Dorothea 3,500 238.00 

Murphy, William F. fit Ruth M. 10,750 731.00 

Myles, Theresa Anne & J. Richard 10,600 720.80 



164 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Name of Taxpayer Estate Estate Estate 

Natoli, Donald J. & Lois M. $ 6,800 $ 462.40 

Neary, Alice B. &. Alvin H. 4,200 285.60 

Nelson, Albert E. & Marjorie E. 5,900 401.20 

Nelson, Duncan M. & Jean R. 4,640 315.52 

Nelson, Erik J. &, Dorothy G. 4,500 306.00 

Nelson, W. Newton 50 3.40 

Nelson, W. Newton &, Eleanor R. 9,450 .642.60 

Nesto, Bruno Richard &, Eugenia R. 7,200 489.60 

Neumann, Ernest P. & Sylvia B. 10,000 680.00 

Neville, Ellen M. , Heirs of 500 34.00 

Neville, Mary A. & Delia M. 4,000 272.00 

Newbold, Thomas 11,550 785.40 

Newell, Lena M. 5,850 397.80 

New England Tel. &. Tel. Co. 160,400 10,907.20 

Newman, Philip & Elsa L. 4,150 282.20 

Newton, Harland B. &, Ethel A. 6,800 462.40 

Newton, Hazel H. 5,500 374.00 

Nichols, Walter & Ethel D. 5,100 346.80 

Nicholson, Robert F. 8c Julia M. 2,800 190.40 

Niles, Robert L. & Virginia M. 7,500 510.00 

Norton, Paul L. 1,500 102.00 

Norton, Paul L. & Margaret 6,500 442.00 

Novak, Kalman &. Nellie R. 1,000 68.00 

Nunez, Vasco E. , Jr. L Llewellyn G. 9,850 669.80 

Nystrom, Foster H. & Edna C. 6,000 408.00 

Ogden, David D. & Joan A, 8,900 605.20 

Ogden, Warren G. , Jr. 6,000 408.00 

(VLeary, Paul J. L Alice M. 12,200 829.60 

Olmsted, Harriet A. 16,000 1,088.00 

Olsen, Ralph &. Marcia E. 4,800 326.40 

0«Reilly, Joseph J. &. Camilla M. 3,800 258.40 

Osborne, Gordon & Freda W. 19,940 1,355.92 

O'Sullivan, William J. & Mary E. 17,800 1,210.40 

Owen, Carlton 8,100 550.80 

Owen, Charles J. &, Mary Lee 6,000 408.00 

Paddock, Louis E. &. Ann E. 7,000 476.00 

Page, Elliott F. &. Emily R. 4,400 299.20 

Page, Stanley W. &, Elisabeth H. 4,900 333.20 

Page, William N. t, Elizabeth J. 8,000 544.00 

Paine, Albert S. k Noelle W. 100 6.80 

Paine, Charles M. 150 10.20 

Paino, John F. & Dolores M. 4,625 314.50 

Palioca, Wayne B. & Ethel R. 8,200 557.60 

Pallotta, Henry & Eleanor A. 4,600 312.80 

Palmer, Attelio A. & Kathryne 5,100 346.80 

Palmer, Eleanor M. 7,500 510.00 

Palmer, George B. , Jr. & Rosemary 7,500 510.00 

Panetta, Franklin &. Theresa 100 6.80 

Panetta, James J. & Rosemary D. 3,950 268.60 

Panetta, Pasquale 300 20.40 

165 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Rea 


1 and 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Es 


tate 


$ 5,900 


$ 


401.20 


4,500 




306.00 


250 




17.00 


6,900 




469.20 


13,100 




890.80 


2,300 




156.40 


6,600 




448.80 


6,500 




442.00 


400 




27.20 


5,750 




391.00 


21,300 


1 


,448.40 


3,850 




261.80 


1,100 




74.80 


4,700 




319.60 


6,900 




469.20 
3.40 


50,940 


3 


,463.92 


7,800 




530.40 


6,020 




409.36 


5,250 




357.00 


5,000 




340.00 


16,450 


1 


,118.60 


10,800 




734.40 


3,150 




214.20 


7,000 




476.00 


12,500 




918.00 


9,000 




612.00 
27.20 


8,850 




601.80 


4,500 




306.00 


5,600 




380.80 


550 




37.40 


24,000 


1 


,632.00 

3.40 

34.00 


9,550 




649.40 


1,650 




112.20 


2,800 




190.40 


16,830 


1 


, 144.44 


200 




13.60 


5,000 




340.00 


9,800 




666.40 


16,350 


1 


,111.80 
3.40 


6,000 




408.00 


6,450 




438.60 
54.40 


6,700 




455.60 


500 




34.00 


1,000 




68.00 



Panetta, Pasquale & Mary 

Panetta, Salvatore fie Rita 

Paquette, Margaret 

Parish, Edward C. , Jr. & Joan DeF, 

Parker, Jackson B. &. Jacqueline 

Parks, Henry A. fie Harriett A. 

Pattinson, Mary I. 

Paulsen, Jack W, &, Suzanne P. 

Pavlo, Samuel G. 

Pearmain, William R. & Claire P. 

Peavy, Leopold, Jr., &. Elizabeth 

Peck, Mildred E. 

Pederson, Sarah A. 

Peirce, Harriet T. 

Peloquin, Roy J. & Alice M. 

Pertzoff, Constantin A. 

Pertzoff, Constantin A. & Olga 

Pertzoff, Olga 

Peterson, Frank W. & Mary E. 

Peterson, George E. & Bertha S. 

Pettit, Kathreen N. 

Phillips, Henry B. & Charlotte T. 

Pierce, Charles Eliot &. Dora R. 

Pino, Frank J. L Muriel E. 

Polumbaum, Theodore S. &. Nyna 

Poor, Jane H. & Fitch, Marion A. 

Porter, Stanley D. &, Josephine 

Post Office Shop 

Powell, Neil H. &, Annie L. 

Powers, Richard E. 

Powers, William C. fc Clara E. 

Pratt, Nancy A. 

Preston, Jean W. 

Preston, William M. 

Primak, John 

Primak, John &. Lena 

Primak, John &, Lena 

Primak, Lena 

Quarton, Gardner & Frances 

Ragan, Ralph R. 

Ragan, Ralph R. L Ruth M. 

Ralston, Robert 

Rand, Lucy Kimball 

Rand, William M. 

Rand, William M. &. Priscilla W. 

Rando, Giovannina 

Rando, Philip 

Rando, Thomas 

Rappoli, Arthur E. L Dorothy H. 

Rawson, Edward B. & Nancy B. 



50 



1,000 



400 



50 
500 



50 



800 



166 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 8,100 


$ 550.80 




5,050 


343.40 




12,200 


829.60 




6,400 


435.20 




3,400 


231.20 




5,700 


387.60 


200 


7,100 


496.40 




3,500 


238.00 




200 


13.60 




350 


23.80 




9,200 


625.60 




13,000 


884.00 




10,600 


720.80 




1,900 


129.20 




5,500 


374.00 




1,500 


102.00 




3,000 


204.00 




10,800 


734.40 




5,600 


380.80 




3,500 


238.00 




5,400 


367.20 




2,500 


170.00 




1,000 


68.00 




3,550 


241.40 




6,300 


428.40 


150 


9,800 


676.60 


rs. 


4,300 


292.40 


50 


5,300 


363.80 




7,500 


510.00 




500 


34.00 




8,900 


605.20 




7,500 


510.00 




6,400 


435.20 




5,300 


360.40 




1,500 


102.00 




600 


40.80 




3,350 


227.80 




10,200 


693.60 




8,250 


561.00 




4,900 


333.20 




1,700 


115.60 




12,500 


850.00 




4,050 


275.40 




3,400 


231.20 




5,000 


340.00 




5,750 


391.00 




100 


6.80 




4,500 


306.00 




3,500 


238.00 



Reed, Kenneth C. & Margaret M. 
Ricci, Joseph, Louis, Fred 

& Charles 
Rice, Arthur W. , Jr. &. Pauline K 
Rice, Earl S. & Naoma F. 
Rice, James F. , Jr. & Barbara A. 
Rice, Richard B. L Grace W. 
Rice, Ruth D. 

Richards, Henry J. & Blanche C. 
Richardson, Howard C. 
Richardson, John A. W. &. Anna H. 
Richardson, John A. W. & Anna H. 
Richardson, Lyle 
Riley, Allston & Marion H. 
Riley, William B. & Mary M. , 

Estate of 
Ritson, David M. & C. Edda 
Roach, Martin J. 
Robbins, Roland W. &. Geraldine 
Robey, A. Alexander L Harriet S. 
Robichaud, George U. & Emma 
Robinson, Dora A. 
Robinson, Morris R. & Mary C. 
Robus, Tamzin K. , Estate of 
Rodiraan, Mildred M. 
Rodiman, Mildred M. & Clark C. 
Rodrick, William D. & Alice E. 
Rogers, Alfred P. 

Rogers, Alfred P. & George E. , T 
Rogers, David F. 
Rogers, John H. , Estate of 
Rollins, Barbara 
Rollins, J. Leslie & Barbara 
Rollins, Oliver W. & Hala P. 
Rood, Allan & Jane 
Rooney, Edward D. & Elizabeth M. 
Rooney, John J. & Margaret C. 
Root, Harriet E. 
Root, Lily Frederica 
Ross, William C. L Marian L. 
Rouner, Thomas J. & Doris J. 
Row, Ronald V. & Jane E. 
Rowe, Lawrence L. & Mildred M. 
Rowe, Standish S. 
Roy, Nancy C. 
Rufo, John & Helen L. 
Ruocco, Ralph J. A. & Isabel I. 
Russell, James D. & McPartland, 

Marguerite 
Ryan, Frank A. 
Ryan, James J. &, Helen 
Ryan, Lawrence 



167 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 
Value of Value of Real and 
Personal Real Personal 
Estate Estate Estate 



Ryan, Mary A. 

Ryan, Mary J. 

Ryan, William H. & Mary B. 

Ryer, Russell E. & Margaret C. 

Sabbag, Arthur & Evelyn J. 

Sagendorph, Mrs. J. Hansell 

Sample, Wilbur H. &. Joan G. 

Sampson, Coleman W. & Phyllis E. 

Sanderson, George A. &. Priscilla R 

Santangelo, Laura B. & John 

Sa'tterfield, Charles N. & Anne P. 

Sawtell, Clement C. & Adelaide I. 

Schaal, Albert A. L Zelpha M. 

Schirmer, Ruth A. 

Schlaifer, Robert 0. 

Schumacher, August 

Schumacher, August & Mary L. 

Schwann, William 

Scott, Hermon H. 

Scott, Robert W. 

Secora, Julia 

Seeckts, E. William 

Seeckts, Marion E. &, Ehlert W. 

Segadelli, Doris C. & John J. 

Sexton, Maurice J. 

Shambaugh, Benjamin & Joan D. 

Shank, Maurice E. & Virginia L. 

Shansky, David & Nettie 

Shapiro, Ascher H. &. Sylvia C. 

Shaw, Alice DeS. 

Shaw, Harold &. Ethel C. 

Shea, Catherine E. , Estate of 

Shea, William J. L Margaret T. 

Shepard, Paul F. 

Sherman, Daniel E. 

Sherman, Daniel E. , Jr. &. Sadie J. 

Sherwin, Edward V. 

Shoraphe, Patrick W. &, Anne B. 

Shrock, Robert R. 

Shurling, Watson &, Emily I. 

Siler, William C. & Barbara Jean 

Silva, Manuel, Jr. 

Silva, Mary E. 

Simonds, Anthony J. 

Slmonds, Lena J. 

Sims, Mildred A. 

Slsson, John H. L Barbara B. 

Skilton, Edna R. L McDermott, 

Pauline F. 
Smith, Carl D. & Florence C. 
Smith, John E. &. Patricia Ann 



100 



2,400 
4,000 
2,200 
6,500 

5,500 

15,200 
4,500 
7,000 

18,700 
350 
9,125 
6,500 
70 
6,500 
5,700 
2,510 
1,150 
7,450 
8,500 

21,400 
2,500 
7,500 
4,000 
6,500 
4,100 
5,600 
5,500 
7,500 
600 

19,600 
500 
4,500 
5,000 
4,650 
9,800 
3,750 
1,500 
6,000 
300 
1,300 
4,200 
1,750 

18,250 

5,300 

100 

1,700 

10,800 

5,000 
5,500 
4,500 



163.20 
272.00 
149.60 
442.00 

374.00 

1,033.60 
306.00 
476.00 

1,271.60 

23.80 

620.50 

442.00 

4.76 

442.00 

387.60 

170.68 

78.20 

506.60 

578.00 

1,455.20 
170.00 
510.00 
272.00 
442.00 
278.80 
380.80 
374.00 
510.00 
40.80 

1,332.80 

34.00 

306.00 

340.00 

316.20 

666.40 

255.00 

102.00 

408.00 

20.40 

88.40 

285.60 

119.00 

1,241.00 

367.20 

6.80 

115.60 

734.40 

340.00 
374.00 
306.00 



168 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1057 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tj 


ix on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


E 


state 


$ 900 


$ 55,200 


$ 3 


,814.80 




5,500 




374.00 




2,700 




183.60 




5,500 




374.00 




1,000 




68.00 




4,100 




278.80 




4,300 




292.40 




4,850 




329.80 




750 




51.00 




4,050 




275.40 




4,250 




289.00 


on 


5,700 




387.60 




6,000 




408.00 




11,-sqo 




782.00 




3,800 




258.40 




5,000 




340.00 




4,100 




278.80 




5,250 




357.00 




1,000 




68.00 




5,050 




343.40 




6,000 




408.00 




1,750 




119.00 




8,200 




557.60 




5,250 




357.00 




5,000 




340.00 


I. 


5,900 




401.20 


50 






3.40 




5,900 




401.20 




3,500 




238.00 




1,400 




95.20 




7,400 




503.20 




6,350 




431.80 




7,000 




476.00 




7,100 




482.80 




12,500 




850.00 


1,500 






102.00 




2,300 




156.40 




4,350 




295.80 




5,250 




357.00 




8,750 




595.00 


50 






3.40 




8,600 




584.80 




1,600 




108.80 




4,000 




272.00 




21,200 


1 


,441.60 




8,100 




550.80 




1,000 




68.00 




3,500 




238.00 




18,100 


1 


,230.80 




8,000 




544.00 




2,400 




163.20 



Smith, Sumner 

Smith, William B. & Mae W. 

Smith, William J. L Barbara J. 

Smyth, Robert Ralston & Adella C. 

Smulowicz, Bronislaw & Sawera 

Snelling, Charles A. 

Snelling, Dorothy R. 

Snelling, Howard & Elizabeth J. 

Snider, Joseph L. L Greta W. 

Sorenson, Hans, Heirs of 

Sorenson, J. Oscar 

Southack, Theodore L. , Jr. & Mari 

Spence, Robert A. t, Helen M. 

Spencer, Henry W. & Marguerite G. 

Spooner, Frederick C. & Sarah W. 

Spooner, Kenneth 0. & Vera H. 

Spooner, Lily T. 

Stahleker, Carl & Edith H. 

Sterner, John 

Stevens, Frank R. & Katherine L. 

Stevens, Kimball C. & Eleanor G. 

Stockellburg, Arthur A. 

Stratford Realty Co., Inc. 

Street, Earle B. & Janet H. 

Striker, William W. & Marjorie B. 

Sturgis, Alanson H. , Jr. & Anne H 

Sturm, Henry A. 

Sturm, Henry A., Jr. & Harriet W 

Sullivan, Francis J. & Gladys S. 

Sullivan, Winifred P. 

Swan, Edmund & Eleanor G. 

Swanson, Alfred 

Swanson, Arthur A. & Joan C. 

Swanson, Arthur W. &, Helen K. 

Swanson, John, Realty Corp. 

Swanson Pontiac, Inc. 

Swanson Realty Corp. 

Swartz, Eli & Jeanette W. 

Sweeney, Joseph E. & Jeanne M. 

Swift, Orlando B. &. Janice B. 

Swift, William Nye 

Swift, William N. & Phyllis C. 

Swinconeck, John J. 

Taillacq, Elsie 

Tarbell, George G. , et al, Trs. 

Tarbell, George G. , Jr. 

Tarky, William J., Jr. 

Tasker, Eliza J. 

Taylor, Edward S. 

Taylor, Frederick B. & Lex H. 

Teabo, Eugene R. &. Alice M. 



169 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Telling, Irving &, Jane C. 
Tennessee Gas Transmission Co. 
Tetreault, Arthur H. & Anne G. 
Tetreault, Arthur H. & Claire F. 
Tew, John B. 

Thiessen, Arthur E. & Laura 
Thomas, Melvin H. L Phyllis I. 
Thompson, Cameron S. , Jr. & 
Nancy L. 
Thompson, G. Brooks, Jr. & Arlene 
Thorpe, Margaret M. 
Thorson, Robert H. L Kathryn F. 
Tirrell, Horace P. &. Ethelyn S. 
Tobey, Aubrey C. & Cynthia W. 
Todd, Mabel H. 
Todd, Pauline E. , Adm. 
Toler, Louise C. 
Tonseth, Didrick &, Phebe 
Torode. Herbert 1^. & Lorraine S. 
Tracey, Elizabeth C. 

Tracey, Joseph R. $1,700 

Tracey, Joseph R. & Elizabeth M. 
Tracy, John W. &, Gertrude G. 
Troisi, Ferdinand L. &. Mary G. 
Trueworthy, Thurston C. &. Helen F. 
Tucker, Gardner 

Tunnell, Raymond W. & Suzanne D. 
Turner, Charles F. &. Winifred A. 
Tyler, Ethel A., Admx. 
Tyler, Watson, Heirs of 

Umbrello, Carmel V. & Francesca 
Umbrello, Francis &. Virginia 

Vance, Jane K. 

Vandell, Robert F. & Margaret E. 

Van Leer, Hans L. 

Van Leer, Hans L. & Mary K. 

Van Rennes, Albert B. &. Mabel C. 

Van Wart, Walter L. & Mary A. 

Vedoe, Russell A. &. Mary E. 

Vercollone, Edmund S. & Julia 

Vitale, Joseph A. &. M. Frances 

Wadsworth, Charles Y. &. Virginia D. 

Waible, Wendell J. &. Florence E. 

Walen, Roger S. & Constance M. 

Wales, Andrew M. &. Betty R. 

Wales, Isabel G. 

Wales, R. Langdon &. Ruth W. 

Wang, An L Lorraine C. 

Ward, Henry DeC. &. Janet Clarke 



5, 


500 


$ 374.00 


49 


350 


3,355.80 


5 


000 


340.00 


6 


000 


408.00 


15 


,400 


1,047.20 


13 


,600 


924.80 


2 


,600 


176.80 


5 


,200 


353.60 


8 


,300 


564.40 


7 


,000 


476.00 


7 


,100 


482.80 


5 


,500 


374.00 


1 


,000 


68.00 


16 


,700 


1, 135.60 


27 


,900 


1,897.20 


5 


,000 


340.00 


1 


,850 


125.80 


2 


,750 


187.00 


8 


,300 


564.40 
115.60 


4 


,150 


282.20 


3 


,000 


204.00 


1 


,900 


129.20 




500 


34.00 


1 


,500 


102.00 


6 


500 


442.00 


4 


,400 


299.20 


2 


,700 


183.60 


2 


,700 


183.60 


6 


,000 


408.00 


7 


,950 


540.60 


18 


700 


1,271.60 


7 


,500 


510.00 




900 


61.20 


11. 


000 


748.00 


1 


000 


68.00 


1 


600 


108.80 


6 


500 


442.00 


6, 


,100 


414.80 


7 


,100 


482.80 


18 


200 


1,237.60 


5 


200 


353.60 


4, 


000 


272.00 


11. 


500 


782.00 


14, 


800 


1,006.40 


1, 


000 


68.00 


15, 


500 


1,054.00 


11. 


700 


795.60 



170 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


$ 5,000 


$ 340.00 


4,750 


323.00 


6,500 


442.00 


13,200 


897.60 


10,500 


714.00 


4,400 


299.20 


100 


6.80 


5,500 


374.00 


5,000 


340.00 


10,500 


714.00 


8,300 


564.40 


3,500 


238.00 


6,500 


442.00 


4,500 


306.00 


$2,100 


142.80 


3,500 


238.00 


17,150 


1, 166.20 


13,200 


897.60 


4,800 


326.40 


5,100 


346.80 


6,900 


469.20 


7,6 50 


520.20 


5,400 


367.20 


2,400 


163.20 


600 


40.80 


5,100 


346.80 


8,000 


544.00 


4,750 


323.00 


4,900 


333.20 


1,300 


88.40 


6,100 


414.80 


9,100 


618.80 


5,250 


357.00 


6,500 


442.00 


7,000 


476.00 


9,200 


625.60 


5,000 


340.00 


100 


6.80 


27,650 


1,880.20 


3,200 


217.60 


3,200 


217.60 


5,800 


394.40 


8, 200 


557.60 


5,000 


340.00 


4,500 


306.00 


4,500 


306.00 


4,950 


336.60 


5,000 


340.00 


8,100 


550.80 


420 


28.56 



Ward, Walter B. b Sophie E. 
Ward, Walter B. , Jr. b Marie L. 
Ware, H. Spanton b Vivian V. 
Warner, Henrietta S. 
Warner, John Burton & Barbara K. 
Washburn, Mabel L. b Rachel W. 
Washburn, Rachel W. 
Webb, Rosella 

Welch, Vernon F. & Leatrice June 
Weld, Anne S. b Frederick C. 
Wells, George b Katherine W. 
Westcott, Charles W. C. b Mary 
Westcott, Vernon C. b Mary Alice 
Weston, Georgianna H. 
Western Union Tel. b Tel. 
Whalen, William B. b Mary E. 
Wheeler, Elizabeth F. , Ann H. , 

Mary L. b Ruth A. Gale 
White, Katharine S. b John W. 
White, Robert E. & Marion J. 
Whitney, Harold A. &. Consuelo V. 
Wilbor, John S. b Anne F. 
Wiley, G. Arnold &, Helen 
Wilfert, Fred J. b Eleanor M. 
Wilfert, Walter A. b Eleanor A. 
Wilfert, Walter A. b Eleanor A., 

Fred J. &. Eleanor M. 
Wilkie, Earl L. b Virginia A. 
Willard, Henry L. b Helen S. 
Willard, Leslie M. b Bernice L. 
Williams, Edwin L. , Jr. b Ruth D. 
Williamson, Elizabeth R. 
Wilson, Elizabeth 
Wilson, John Otis 
Wilson, Melvin S. b Eleanor F. 
Wilson, Montgomery S. & Mary Ann 
Wilson, Robert D. b Kathryn M. 
Wilson, William A. b Eleanor L. 
Winchell, Gordon D. b Enid M. 
Winchell, Guilbert 
Winchell, Guilbert b Evelyn 
Winchell, Guilbert'S. b Amy Jane 
Witham, Arthur R. b Margaret F. 
Witherton, John R. 
Wood, Frank H. b Jeanne R. 
Wood, George A., Jr. b Nancy S. 
Wood, James b Lizzie 
Wood, James D. b Ruth E. 
Wood, 0. Chester b Hilve V. 
Wood, Robert C. b Margaret B. 
Woodington, W. Gordon b Mary L. 
Woodland Trust 



171 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1957 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 6,500 


$ 442.00 


s. 


3,500 


238.00 




5,500 


374.00 




6,000 


408.00 




600 


40.80 




3,150 


214.20 




2,350 


159.80 




1,100 


74.80 




4,530 


308.04 




5,100 


346.80 




6,700 


455.60 




9,500 


646.00 



Woods, Henry A. & Barbara R. 
Woodworth, Robert W. &. Catherine S 
Worsham, Jack L. & Charlotte A, 
Worthington, Thomas K. & 

Elizabeth C. 

Yagjian, Jacob & Inez 
Young, David B. b Cora S. 
Young, Edward L. 

Zarella, Joseph S. & Lillian M, 
Zdanowski, John J. & Mary A. 
Ziegler, Elmer H. & Hilda M. 
Zinck, Floyd A. & Elma W. 
Zollo, Carmen 



172 



TRUST FUNDS 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



During the year 1957 Massachusetts Savings Banks for 
the most part paid interest at the rate of 3 to 3 1/4% 
while U. S. A. Series G Bonds and Series F Bonds held to 
maturity gave a return of 2 1/2% and 2.53% respectively. 

However, in 1957, certain corporate bonds legal for 
savings banks in Massachusetts became available at 
yields ranging from 4% to 4.95%, more or less. 

Accordingly, as savings bank interest dates occurred 
and as U. S. A. Bonds matured, or as cash otherwise 
became available, in most cases the Commission invested 
in corporate bonds with a resulting increase in income. 
In all, $21,000 par value of bonds were bought in this 
manner in 1957. 

In view of the difficulty of predicting the trend of 
interest rates, it has been the policy of the Trust Fund 
Commissioners, when practicable, to shift from U. S. A. 
Bonds and from savings bank deposits to corporate bonds 
in a number of steps, thereby insuring a fair average 
return. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Richard F. Schroeder 
William T. King 
Clement C. Sawtell 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 



173 



TRUST FUNDS 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1957 $ 2,800.53 

Income received in 1957: 

Savings bank and bond interest $ 825.63 
Less accrued Interest paid on 

bonds purchased 7.53 

$ 818.10 
Annuity u/w John H. Pierce 3,000.00 

Rent of Pierce House - 1956 (one-half) 300.00 

- 1957 600.00 

Well-child Clinic fees 14.50 

Dental Clinic fees 1,532.18 

Salvation Army, for Dental Clinic 395.24 

Miscellaneous . 54 6,660.56 

Refund of benefits paid in prior year 1,542.25 

Withdrawn from savings bank 2,000.00 

Interest income applied to amortize 

bond purchase premiums 5.80 



Payments made per order of Selectmen; 

Hospital and nursing-home care $2,043.46 
Medicines 31.60 

Doctors' bills 39.00 

Nursing care 180.00 

Well-child Clinic 430.27 

Dental Clinic 2,074.85 

Repairs to Pierce House 1,904.31 

Care of grounds 175 . 00 

$6,878.49 
Safe deposit box rent 1.84 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 

119.84 
Deposited in savings bank 1,500.00 

3,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% bond 
due 1985, purchased 



$13,009.14 



Cash balance at December 31, 1957 $^1^509^58^ 

Cash and Securities at December 31. 1957 

Cash on deposit $ 1,509.58 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 542.77 

Provident Institution for Savings 2,948.12 

8,500 USA Series "F M due April 1, 1958, at cost 6,290.00 

2,000 USA Series "F" due March 1, 1960, at cost 1,480.00 

2,700 USA Series »»F M due Dec. 1, 1960, at cost 1,998.00 

3,500 USA Series "F M due July 1, 1962, at cost 2,590.00 

2,500 USA Series M G" 2 1/2% due Nov. 1, 1959 2,500.00 

3,000 American Tel. L Tel. 4 3/8% 1985 2,999.39 

2,000 Baltimore L Ohio RR Equip. Tr. "CC" 3% 1961 1,995.72 

3,000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 1972 2,984.25 

174 



TRUST FUNDS 



2,000 Great Northern Rwy Equip. Tr. 2 7/8% 1960 $ 1,990.62 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power 3 5/8% 1986 2,913.75 

3,000 Pacific Tel. &, Tel. 4 3/8% 1988 3,134.25 

3,000 Southern California Edison 3% 1965 2,905.00 
1,000 Virginia Electric L Power 4 1/8% 1986 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 
Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1957 $ .35 

1956 income not previously reported 10.00 

1957 interest income $174.18 
Less accrued interest paid on 

bonds purchased 17.13 157.05 

Withdrawn from savings bank accounts 2,052.00 
Interest applied to amortize bond 

purchase premiums 15. 15 



$2,234.55 



Payments per order Trust Fund Commissioners: 

Waverly Post No. 1272 V.F.W. Band $192.00 
Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 26.20 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 

due 1983 1,003.75 

1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 
due 1985 1.010.00 

Cash balance at December 31, 1957 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1957 

Cash on deposit $ 2.60 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 273.91 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 55.54 

1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 1985 1,000.00 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip. Trust "CC M 3% 1961 997.86 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 1983 1,000.00 

1,000 Southern California Edison 3% 1965 1,000.00 

1,000 Virginia Electric fc Power 4 1/8% 1986 1.037.35 

$ 5.367.26 

Accumulated income $ 172.51 

Principal 5.194.75 



175 



TRUST FUNDS 



DeCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1957 

Interest income received in 1957 $737.18 

Less accrued interest paid on 

bonds purchased 22 . 34 

Withdrawn from savings banks 
Income applied to amortize bond 
purchase premiums 



10.85 



714.84 
3,000.00 

8.29 

$3,733.98 



Safe deposit box rent $ 3.00 

Paid to Town of Lincoln, 1957 net income 711.84 
Bonds purchased: 

1,000 Idaho Power 4 1/2% 1987 1,000.00 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 

4% 1983 1,003.75 

1,000 Pacific Gas &, Electric 
5% 1989 

Cash balance at December 31, 1957 



3.726.57 
$ 7.41 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1957 

Cash on deposit 

Cambridge Savings Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

10,000 USA Series "G" 2 1/2% due April 1, 1958 

1,000 USA Series "G" 2 1/2% due Nov. 1, 1959 

1,000 US Treasury 2 1/2% due March 15, 1970-65 

2,000 US Treasury 2 3/4% due April 1, 1980-75 

1,000 Alabama Power 3 1/2% 1972 

1,000 American Tel. L Tel. 2 3/4% 1975 

1,000 Baltimore L Ohio RR Equip. Trust "CC" 3% 1961 

1,000 Idaho Power 4 1/2% 1987 

1,000 Northern Pacific RR Equip. Trust 2 3/4% 1966 

1,000 Pacific Gas L Electric 5% 1989 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 1983 

1,000 Southern California Edison 3% 1965 

1,000 Western Maryland RR 4% 1969 



$ 7.41 

1,791.52 

247.48 

10,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,009.55 

2,024.05 

989.80 

948.30 

997.86 

1,000.00 

989.95 

1,007.78 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

1.019.77 

$25.033.47 



176 



TRUST FUNDS 

ABB IE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1957 

Interest income received In 1957 $ 103.62 

Less accrued interest paid on 

bonds purchased 11.78 

Interest income applied to amortize 
bond purchase premiums 
Withdrawn from Middlesex Institution for Savings 



Safe deposit box rent $ 3.00 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 67.37 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% bond 
due 1983, purchased 1.003 .75 

Cash balance at December 31, 1957 

Cash and Securities .at December 31. 1957 

Cash on deposit 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 
1,000 Southern Bell Tel. 4% 1983 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



7.82 



91.84 



3.75 
1.000.00 

$1,103.41 



29.29 



$ 29.29 

1,300.80 

905.87 

1.000.00 

$3.235.96 

$2,010.91 
1.225.05 

$3.235.96 



177 



TRUST FUNDS 

LINCOLN LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 
Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1957 $ 45.04 

Income received in 1957: 

Julia A. Bemis Fund $ 23.57 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr Fund 2.55 

Codman Fund 15.65 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 13.72 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 4.94 

John H. Pierce Fund 39.63 

Philip W. Place Fund 1.95 

George Russell Fund 14.80 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 65.52 

Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund 35.50 

George G. Tarbell Fund $113.58 

Less accrued interest paid on 

bonds purchased 17. 13 96.45 

Constance Taylor Fund 2.53 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 42.64 359.45 

Withdrawn from savings banks: 

George G. Tarbell Fund 2,000.00 

Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund 164.96 

Interest income applied to amortize bond 

purchase premiums 5. 00 



$2,574.45 



Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate $ 239.63 
Safe deposit box rent 3.00 

Edith B. Farrar, Librarian, income from 

John H. Pierce Fund 39.63 

Purchase of Encyclopedia Brittanica, from 

Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund 204.00 

Bonds purchased, George G. Tarbell Fund: 

1,000 Southern Bell Tel. 4% 1983 1,003.75 

1,000 Western Mass. Electric 4 3/8% 1987 

Cash balance at December 31, 1957 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1957 

Accumulated 
Income 
on Deposit Principal Total 
Julia A. Bemis Fund 
Middlesex Institution for Savings $88.37 $684.05 $772.42 

Elizabeth fc Leland Burr Fund 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 13.89 70.00 83.89 

Codman Fund 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 38.11 474.59 512.70 



178 



TRUST FUNDS 



Accumulated 
Income 
on Deposit Principal Total 
Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 
Warren Institution for Savings $52.74 $397.00 $449.74 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 
Middlesex Institution for Savings - 158.89 158.89 

John H. Pierce Fund 

Cambridge Savings Bank - 500.00 500.00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings - 614.57 614. 57 

1,114.57 1,114.57 

Philip W. Place Fund 
Warren Institution for Savings 3.79 61.00 64.79 

George Russell Fund 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 69.31 415.74 485.05 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 150.06 930.00 1,080.06 

Provident Institution for Savings 83.61 1.000.00 1.083.61 

1,930.00 2,163.67 

Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund 
Middlesex Institution for Savings - 1,136.07 1,136.07 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 84.15 138.38 222.53 

Provident Institution for Savings 67,92 - 67.92 

Warren Institution for Savings 83.98 1,000.00 1,083.98 

1,000 Southern Bell Tel. 4% 1983 - 1,000.00 1,000.00 
1,000 Western Mass. Elec. 4 3/8% 

1987 - 1.000.00 1.000.00 

3,138.38 3,374.43 

Constance Taylor Fund 
Warren Institution for Savings 10.34 73.00 83.34 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 161.67 1,235.46 1,397.13 



$907.94 $10,888.75 $11,796.69 
Accumulated income on deposit 83. 19 _ 83. 19 

$991.13 $10.888.75 $11.879.88 



179 



1 


,257 
250 


,60 
.00 




69 


.69 
r 20 


1 


,940 


.82 



TRUST FUNDS 

LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1957 $ 363.33 

Donations to Fund in 1957: 
To General fund: 

Lincoln School Association $100.00 

4-II Club 125.00 

School operetta proceeds 225.00 

Class 8 C, Smith School 26.40 

General appeal 781. 20 

To Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 

Interest income $ 79.13 

Less accrued interest paid on 

bonds purchased 9 .44 

Bond interest applied to amortize 
bond purchase premium 



Payments per order Fund Trustees: 

Printing appeal letter and postage $ 46.35 
Scholarship grants: 

Phyllis R. Campobasso, Colby College 200.00 
Valerie V. Chodsky, Harvard University 125.00 
Stephen E. Murphy, Rutgers University 75.00 

1,000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5% bond 

due 1989 purchased 1,007.98 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 15.47 1.469.80 

Cash balance at December 31, 1957 ^m^mm^mimL 

Cash and Securities at December 31. 1957 

Cash on deposit $ 471.02 

Provident Institution for Savings 515.47 

1,000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 1972 994.75 

1,000 Pacific Gas S, Electric 5% 1989 1.007.78 

$2.989.02 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund $ 500.00 

General fund 



$2.989.02 



180 



TRUST FUNDS 

DEMIS LECTURE FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1957 $ 658.01 

Interest income received in 1957 $1,109.78 

Less accrued interest on 

bonds purchased 20.91 1,088.87 

Withdrawn from savings banks 3,012.62 

$7,800 USA Series "G" bonds matured 7,800.00 

Interest income applied to amortize 
bond purchase premiums 6 . 46 



$12,565.96 



Payments per order Fund trustees: 

January 18 - Roger T. Peterson $ 200.00 

February 25 - Nicolas Slonimsky 100.00 

October 24 - Mildred Capron 150.00 

November 18 - Cleveland P. Grant 150.00 

Janitor services at lectures 20.00 

Projector services at lectures 13.00 

Rent of piano 85.00 

Printing and postage 150.65 

Safe deposit box rent 3 .00 

$ 871.65 

Bonds purchased: 

2,000 Idaho Power 4% 1987 2,000.00 

1,000 Idaho Power 4 3/4% 1987 1,016.08 
3,000 American Tel. L Tel. 4 3/8% 1985 3,036.42 

3,000 Western Mass. Electric 4 3/8% 1987 3,000.00 

Deposited in savings banks 1,798.08 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 24.38 



Cash balance at December 31, 1957 $ 819.35 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1957 

Cash on deposit $ 819.35 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 1,015.42 

Provident Institution for Savings 1,867.97 

1,000 USA Series "G" 2 1/2% due Nov. 1, 1959 1,000.00 

3,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 1985 3,035.77 

3,000 Atchison Topeka k Santa Fe Gen'l 4% 1995 3,000.00 

3,000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 1972 2,984.25 

2,000 Idaho Power 4 1/2% 1987 2,000.00 

1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4 3/4% 1987 1,016.08 

3,000 New England Power 3 1/4% 1961 3,000.00 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power 3 5/8% 1986 2,913.75 

3,000 Pacific Tel. L Tel. 4 3/8% 1988 3,134.34 

3,000 Southern California Edison 3% 1965 2,905.00 

1,000 Virginia Electric & Power 4 1/8% 1986 1,037.35 

3,000 Western Mass. Electric 4 3/8% 1987 3.000.00 

$32.729.28 

181 



TRUST FUNDS 



Accumulated income $ 889.24 

Principal 31.840.04 



$32.729. 28 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 
Cash Account 
1957 savings bank interest paid to Town of Lincoln $ 42.85 

Savings Dank Deposits at Dec. 31. 1957 

Middlesex Institution for Savings $ 722.00 

Cambridge Savings Bank 495. 52 



182 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Recommended Budgets for General Purposes 
and Water Department 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town adopt for its 
1958 budget the several appropriations listed and numbered in the 
attached Schedule aggregating $759,940.09 for General Purposes and 
$44,702.50 for the Water Department. 

These aggregates compare with the appropriations last year for 
the same purposes as follows: 

1957 Budget 1957 Expended Recommended Increase 

General Purposes $673,737.67 $645,062.80 $759,940.09 $86,202.42 
Water Department 41,999.75 28,226.24 44,702.50 $ 2,702.75 

Approximately three-quarters of the recommended increase for 
general purposes is directly related to the operation (including 
property insurance) of our Elementary schools and the bond ser- 
vice on the debt for the new construction now in progress, as 
follows : 

Increase in operating budget as reported 
by School Committee after subtracting 
two years' credit under U. S. Public 
Law 874 of $13,262.00 $20,238.00 

School Property Insurance increase 

(estimated) 3,280.00 

Bond service on new bonds for schools, issued 
in 1957 (less interest reduction due to 
retirement of 1957 maturities of previous 
issues) 41.540.00 

Total -- Elementary Schools $65,058.00 

. Other major budget increases: 

Bond service on Fire and Police building 

bonds $ 8,600.00 

Fire Department - Operation 7,250.00 

Fire and Police building - Maintenance . 4,845.00 

Highway (General) 6,984.00 

Unexpended departmental appropriations, other than Water, 
totalled $28,674.87 at the year end and were credited as a wel- 
come addition to the Surplus Account on which we drew so heavily 
last year. The Water Department added $13,773.51 to its working 
balance . 

The Commonwealth has certified the "free cash" of the Town as 
of January 1, 1958, at $90,324.56. This compares with the figure 
of $106,041.00 a year ago. Were it not for the unspent appro- 
priations above referred to and an unexpected distribution of Cor- 

183 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

poration taxes late in the year, we would not have regained as 
much of our "free cash" position. 

Our Committee made the following transfers during the year for 
unforeseen requirements which were charged to the $10,000.00 which 
was appropriated for that purpose from Overlay Surplus: 

Town Hall - Supplies and Miscellaneous .. $ 300.00 

Communications - Equipment and Supplies .. 2,700.34 

Labor at Fires 637.65 

Board of Health - Salaries 250.00 

Supplies & Miscellaneous 324.00 

Highways - Maintenance 500.00 

Street Lighting 1.39 

Schools - Auxiliary Services ..,. 500.00 

Insurance 315.67 

Temporary Loans - Interest 579 . 00 

Total Transferred .... $ 6,108.05 

Balance returned to Overlay Surplus ...... $ 3,891.95 

With the drop in building permits issued by the Town in 1957, 
it would seem improbable that the increase in valuation on account 
of new construction will be as large as the approximately $631,000 
increase that was effective for 1957. We suggest that for our 
thinking at Town Meeting this year we assume that each $7,500.00 
of appropriations will have an effect of $1.00 in the computation 
of the tax rate by the Assessors. 

This year, for the first time, the Budget for General Purposes 
exceeds the three-quarter million dollar mark. The school con- 
struction program, both in the Elementary and Regional schools, 
is far from completed, and these prospective expenditures, plus 
others which the Capital Expenditure Committee Report calls to 
our attention, indicate that we shall continue to be responsible 
for a per capita debt which we believe is among the highest of 
the cities and towns in the Commonwealth. 

Our present expenditures for education, whether on a per capita 
or per pupil basis, we believe are the highest of any comparable 
Massachusetts towns and present trends give no indication of any 
change in this condition. Since our educational costs are such 
a large proportion of the budget, and since the tatal dollars to 
be spent for education in 1958 cannot readily be found from the 
Town Report, we are presenting below a computation of these costs 
for the calendar year 1958, so that the Town may know what they 
are : 



Our Share 
Elementary Regional 

Schools High Combined 

General Control $ 16,010.00 $ 5,885.00 $ 21,895.00 

Out of State Travel 600.00 277.00 877.00 

Instruction 196,322.00 66,004.00 262,326.00 



184 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Our Share 
Elementary Regional 

Schools High Combined 

Operation $ 31,152.00* $13,463.00 $ 44,615.00 

Maintenance L Repairs 10,274.00 3,470.00 13,744.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 29,208.00 18,744.00 47,952.00 

Bond Interest L Principal . 80,802.00 41,323.00 122,125.00 

Insurance 8,500.00 1,859.00 10,359.00 

Outlay 2,803.00 1,957.00** 4,760.00 

Other 3.138.00 3. 138.00 

TOTAL COST $375,671.00 $156,120.00 $531,791.00 

* Including $13,262.00 from Public Law 874 
** Including $1,292.00 from Public Law 874 



Elementary 



High 



Combined 



Pupils - Average for 
Calendar Year 1958 



725 



151 



876 



Total cost per pupil $ 518.00 $1,033.00 



607.00 



The above total cost has to be met from the following estimated 
sources : 



Unspent appropriations 

of previous years $ 5,553.00 $17,651.00 

From U. S. Taxes - P.L. 874 13,262.00 1,292.00 

Massachusetts Individual 

Tax on Income 94,178.00 21,437.00 

Miscellaneous receipts .... 1,993.00 

Lincoln property taxes on 
Real Estate, tangible 
Personal Property, in- 
cluding automobiles ..... 260,685.00 115,740.00 



$23,204.00 
14,554.00 

111,615.00 
1,993.00 



380,425.00 



TOTAL COST $375,671.00 $156,120.00 $531,791.00 

Total cost of Schools (1958) - 68.6% of budget, after adjusting 
the Budget figure by adding to it the receipts from Public Law 
874 which do not require appropriation. 

These per pupil figures obviously cannot be used as any basis 
for comparison of the operations of the Elementary School and the 
Regional High School, which are affected by such different factors 

In spite of the increased expense of running our Town in 1958, 
your Finance Committee recommends that the Town make a beginning 
on the Stabilization Fund which we called to the attention of the 
Town in our 1957 report. There does not appear to be any more 



185 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



favorable time to do so and we believe we should start with 
$7,500.00 under the Article for that purpose in the Warrant. 

The recommendations submitted call for the use of $18,000.00 
from the available "free cash" which will reduce it below 
$75,000.00, which is less than 10% of the budget. A 20% or 25% 
ratio would be a much healthier one for a Town with our commit- 
ments and prospective programs. 

Respectfully submitted: 

F. Winchester Denio, Chairman 
Leonard Larrabee 
Paul F. Norton 
William N. Page 
John B. Tew 



186 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

SCHEDULE OF APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES OF 1957 
AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 195 8 

Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1957 1957 1958 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
Executive 



Moderator 














Sele 


ctmen 














2. 


Salaries , 
















Chairman 


$ 


200.00 


$ 


200.00 


$ 


200.00 




2nd member 




200.00 




200.00 




200.00 




3rd member 




200.00 




200.00 




200.00 


3. 


Expenses 




125.00 




105.68 




150.00 


4. 


Out of State 
















Travel 




500.00 




5.22 




250.00 






$ 


1,225.00 


$ 


710.90 


$ 


1,000.00 


Finance Committee 














10. 


Expenses 


$ 


15.00 


$ 


15.00 


$ 


15.00 


Auditor 














11. 


Salary 


$ 


50.00 


$ 


50.00 







Town Office 

15. Clerks, Salaries $ 3,850.00 $ 3,341.64 $ 3,967.00* 

16. Expenses 1.218.00 1. 160.52 1.600.00 

$ 5,068.00 $ 4,502.16 $ 5,567.00 

* $1,000.00 additional 

from Water Works Treasury 

Finance 

Accounting Officer and 
Executive Secretary 

20. Salary $ 2,704.11 $ 2,704.11 $ 3,379.00 

21. Expenses 157.00 152.75 200.00 

$ 2,861.11 $ 2,856.86 $ 3,579.00 

Treasurer 

30. Salary $ 200.00 $ 200.00 $ 200.00 
Asst. Treas. 

Salary 200.00 200.00 200.00 

31. Expense 250.00 249.48 550.00 

$ 650.00 $ 649.48 $ 950.00 

Collector 

40. Salary $ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 

41. Expense 400.00 392.88 500.00 

$ 2,400.00 $ 2,392.88 $ 2,500.00 



187 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1957 1957 1958 

Assessors 

50. Salaries, 

Chairman $ 200.00 $ 200.00 $ 200.00 

2nd member 175.00 175.00 175.00 

3rd member 175.00 175.00 175.00 

51. Clerk, Salary 1,000.00 960.46 1,000.00 

52. Expense 800.00 711.33 800.00 

$ 2,350.00 $ 2,221.79 $ 2,350.00 

Law 
55. Legal $ 500.00 $ 498.49 $ 1,250.00 

Recording and Reporting 

Town Clerk 

60. Salary 

61. Expense 



Election I Registration 

70. Registrars, 

Salaries $ 200.00 $ 200.00 $ 200.00 

71. Tellers &. 

Checkers 100.00 48.00 300.00 

72. Expense 575.00 480.89 700.00 

$ 875.00 $ 728.89 $ 1,200.00 

Planning and Zoning 

Planning Board 

80. Clerical, salary $ 

81. Expenses 



$ 


450.00 


$ 


450.00 


$ 


450.00 




50.00 




48.71 




50.00 


$ 


500.00 


$ 


498.71 


$ 


500.00 



i 50.00 


$ 


49.27 


$ 


50.00 


350.00 




76.10 




750.00 


400.00 


$ 


125.37 


$ 


800.00 



Town Hall 

90. Custodian, 

salary $ 2,957.50 $ 2,900.00 $ 2,100.00 

91. Expense 700.00 925.96* 300.00 

92. Repairs L 

Maintenance 2 .900.00 2 .655 .89 3.450.00 

$ 6,557.50 $ 6,481.85 $ 5,850.00 

* Includes Transfer from 
Reserve Account 

Other General Departments 

95. Consulting & 

Engineering $ 3,000.00 $ 2,041.29 $ 2,000.00 



TOTALS FOR GENERAL $26,451.61 $23,773.67 $ 27,561.00 

GOVERNMENT 

188 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1957 1957 1958 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS 
AND PROPERTY 

Police Department 

100. Salaries $ 20,300.00 $ 20,196.75 $ 22,313.00 

101. Expense 2,869.25 2,850.00 1,680.00 

102. Equipment, 

Maintenance 2 . 000.00 1.984 . 85 2 . 000.00 

$ 25,169.25 $25,031.60 $25,993.00 

Fire Department 

110. Engineers, 

salaries 

111. Firemen 

112. Instruction &. 

Training 

113. Expense 

114. Apparatus 

maintenance 

115. Hydrant Service 



500.00 


$ 500.00 


$ 500.00 


3,500.00 


4,137.65* 


9,000.00 


500.00 


151.00 


500.00 


2,400.00 


2,357.18 


3,500.00 


600.00 


600.00 


1,250.00 


3.495.00 


3.495.00 


3.495.00 



$ 10,995.00 $11,240.83 $ 18,245.00 



* Includes Transfer from 
Reserve Account 

Fire and Police 
Building 

120. Custodian and 

Watch., salary $ 3,795.00 

121. Headquarters, 

Repairs & Maint. 1,800.00 

122. Outside rentals $ 1.500.00 $ 1.500.00 750.00 

$ 1,500.00 $ 1,500.00 $ 6,345.00 

Communications 

125. Wages $ 8,000.00 $ 7,809.84 $ 8,000.00 

126. Equipment 

purchase 3,100.00* 2,940.50 500.00 

127. Equipment rental 

L maint. 3,700.00 6,400.34** 2,300.00 

128. Expense 500.00 308 .40 



$ 15,300.00 $17,459.08 $10,800.00 



* Includes $2,500 additional 
at Special Town Meeting 
** Includes transfer from 
Reserve Account 

Tree Warden 

130. Salary $ 200.00 $ 200.00 $ 200.00 

131. Pruning and 

removal 2.000.00 1.534.55 3.000.00 

$ 2,200,00 $ 1,734.55 $ 3,200.00 



189 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1957 1957 1958 

Moth Department 

140. Insect Control $ 3,000.00 $ 384.69 $ 1,500.00 

141. Dutch Elm Disease 

Control L Tree 

Removal 4.000.00 3 . 891.48 3.000.00 

$ 7,000.00 $ 4,276.17 $ 4,500.00 

Civil Defense 
150. Equipment 



purchase $ 
151. Expense 

$ 


550.00 
550.00 


$ 
$ 


268.91 
268.91 


Inspectors of Buildings 








170. Salaries & 

Transportation $ 2 

171. Expense 


,400.00 
100.00 


$ 


1,234.20 
67.25 



$ 200.00 

200.00 

$ 400.00 



$ 1,750.00 
100.00 
$ 2,500.00 $ 1,301.45 $ 1,850.00 

Doard of Appeals 

181. Expense $ 350.00 $ 174.90 $ 350.00 

TOTALS FOR PROTECTION $65,564.25 $62,987.49 $71,683.00 
OF PERSONS &. PROPERTY 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 
Board of Health 

200. Salaries of Public 

Health Nurses $ 2,440.00 $ 2,690.00* $ 2,590.00** 

201. Expense 925.00 1,052.97* 925.00 

202. Inspection 

services 1.500.00 1. 169.23 1. 250.00 

$ 4,865.00 $ 4,912.20 $ 4,765.00 

* Includes Transfer from 
Reserve Account 

** $860.00 additional to 

be paid by School Dept. 

Sanitation 

210. Garbage collection $ 4.250.00 $ 3.953.75 $ 4.500.00 * 

* To be taken from Free 
Cash and returned 
thereto from Garbage 
Collection Receipts 



190 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1957 1057 1058 



Pest Control 

220. Mosquito 

Control 

Inspector of 
Animals 

230. Salary 

TOTALS FOR HEALTH 
AND SANITATION 



$ 6.500.00 $ 6.500.00 



$ 100.00 $ 100.00 



$15,715.00* $15,465.95 



* Includes $6,500 under 
Special Article for 
Mosquito Control in 
1957 



HIGHWAYS 



General Highways 
300. Salaries 
Expense 
Highway 

Maintenance 
Equipment 

Maintenance 
Snow & Ice 

Removal and 
Control 
305. Street Lights 



301 
302 



303 



304 



$19,200.00 
300.00 

15,000.00 

8,500.00 

6,500.00 

6.442.02 

$55,942.02 



* Includes Transfer from 
Reserve Account 

Highway Building 



3 10. Maintenance &. 

Repairs 
311. Expense 



Chapter 90 

32 0. Maintenance 
321. Construction 



$ 1,200.00 

300.00 

$ 1,500.00 



$ 4,500.00 

13.000.00 

$17,500.00 



$17,338.72 
185.00 

15,009.63* 
5,291.37 



4,225.03 
6.443.41 * 
$48,493.16 



$ 1,187.80 

250.00 

$ 1,437.80 



$ 4,493.95 

16. 144.14 * 
$20,638.09 



* Includes $3,144.14 balance from 1956 

** State and County Share of $3,000 for 

Item 320 and $10,500 for Item 321 to 

be taken from Free Cash and returned 

to Free Cash when received. 



$ 6.000.00 



$ 100.00 



$15,365.00 



$23,576.12 
300.00 

20,000.00 

6,000.00 

6,500.00 

6.550.00 

$62,926.12 



$ 1,200.00 

300.00 

$ 1,500.00 



$ 4,500.00** 
14.000.00 ** 
$18,500.00 



191 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1957 1957 1958 

Poison Ivy Control 

330. Expense $ 1.350.00 $ 794.63 $ 1.000.00 

TOTALS FOR HIGHWAYS $76,292.02* $71,363.68 $83,926.12 



507. New Equipment 



* Includes $1,350.00 under Special 
Article for Poison Ivy Control 
in 1957. 

CHARITIES 

400. Aid to Citizens $18,000.00 $18,000.00 $19,500.00 

401. Administration, 

salary 600.00 592.00 600.00 

402. Expenses 100.00 93.06 100.00 

403. Veterans' 

services 500.00 100.00 

$19,200.00 $18,685.06 $20,300.00 

TOTALS FOR CHARITIES $19,200.00 $18,685.06 $20,300.00 



EDUCATION 

Elementary School 

500. General Control $ 14,685.00 $ 14,367.93 $ 16,010.00 

501. Out of State 

Travel 300.00 268.62 600.00 

502. Instruction 172,555.00 169,597.43 196,322.00 

503. Operation 27,556.00 25,802.94 17,890.00* 

504. Maintenance 7,988.00 7,930.40 10,274.00 

505. Auxiliary 

Agencies 26,065.00 26,349.01** 29,208.00 

506. Outlay 1,920.00 1,709.88 2,803.00**1 



$252,869.00 $247,816.09 $273,107.00 



* To be supplemented by 

receipts under U.S. Public 
Law 874 
** Includes Transfer from 
Reserve Account 
*** $711.84 to be taken from 

deCordova School Equipment 
Fund and $42.85 from the 
Grammar School Fund Income. 

Regional High School 

510. Lincoln-Sudbury $ 121.235 .80 $ 121.235 .80 $ 115.739.77 
Regional Sch . Dist. 



192 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1957 1957 1958 

Library 

520. Salaries $ 5,311.00 $ 4,919.50 $ 7,350.00* 

521. Books 1,450.00 1,396.60 1,650.00 

522. Expense 272.00 237.09 450.00 

$ 7,033.00 $ 6,553.19 $ 9,450.00 

* $1,001.99 to be taken from 
County dog tax receipts 

Library Building 

530. Expense $ 103.00 $ 90.49 $ 103.00 

531. Repairs &. 

maintenance 1 . 270.00 1 . 049 . 15 910.00 

$ 1,373.00 $ 1,139.64 $ 1,013.00 

TOTALS FOR EDUCATION $382,510.80 $376,744.72 $399,309.77 



RECREATION 

Playground 

600. Salaries $ 1,925.00 $ 1,735.50 $ 1,925.00 

601. Expense 1.295.00 752.88 1. 170.00 

$ 3,220.00 $ 2,488.38 $ 3,095.00 

Parks 

610. Mowing $ 1,100.00 $ 1,100.00 $ 1,100.00 

611. Labor 300.00 154.15 300.00 

$ 1,400.00 $ 1,254.15 $ 1,400.00 

TOTALS FOR 

RECREATION $ 4,620.00 $ 3,742.53 $ 4,495.00 



CEMETERIES 

700. Salaries $ 150.00 $ 150.00 $ 150.00 

701. Clerical 75.00 

702. Interments 500.00 191.66 500.00 

703. Labor and 

Maintenance 2,825.00 1,441.56 2,750.00 

704. Expense 120.00 45.00 120.00 

$ 3,595.00 $ 1,828.22 $ 3,595.00 

TOTALS FOR CEMETERIES $ 3,5 95.00 $ 1,82 8.22 $ 3,595.00 



TOWN DEBT SERVICE 

800. School Bldg. 

Bonds $ 32,000.00 $ 32,000.00 $ 57,000.00 

801. Int. on School 

Bonds 7,262.50 7,262.50 23,802.50 

802. Hwy. Bldg. Bonds 4,000.00 4,000.00 4,000.00 

803. Int. on Hwy. Bldg. 

Bonds 140.00 140.00 70.00 

193 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1957 1957 1958 

804. Fire L Police 

Bldg. Bonds $ 5,000.00 

805. Int. on Fire L 

Police Bonds 3,600.00 

806. Int. on Tax Notes $ 1,500.00 $ 2,079.00* 1,500.00 

807. Water Works 

Bonds 5,500.00 5,500.00 5,000.00** 

808. Int. on Water 

Works Bonds 1.388.75 1.388.75 1.237.50 ** 
$51,791.25 $52,370.25 $101,210.00 

* Includes Transfer from 
Reserve Account 
** To be taken from Water 
Works Treasury 

TOTALS FOR DEBT SERVICE $51,791.25 $52,370.25 $101,210.00 



UNCLASSIFIED 

900. Middlesex County 

Pension Fund $ 3,115.99 $ 3,115.99 $ 3,345.20 

901. Employee Insurance 

&. Hosp. Fund 3,700.00 3,505.66 3,700.00 

902. Property Insurance 8,176.89 8,492.56* 11,450.00 

903. Dump - Rent & 

Maint. 1,750.00 1,732.16 2,700.00 

904. Town Reports 1.254.86 1.254.86 1. 300.00 

$17,997.74 $18,101.23 $ 22,495.20 

* Includes Transfer from 
Reserve Account 

TOTALS FOR 

UNCLASSIFIED $17,997.74 $18,101.23 $ 22,495.20 



905. Reserve Fund $10,000.00 * $ 10,000.00 



* Transfer from 1957 Reserve 
Fund of $6,108.05 are listed 
in expenditures listed above. 

TOTAL 1957 APPROPRIATIONS 

L EXPENDITURES $ 673,737.67 $ 645.062.80 

TOTAL RECOMMENDED 

FOR 1958 $759,940.09 



191 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1957 1957 1958 

WATER 

950. Salaries, 

Commissioners $ 225.00 $ 225.00 $ 225.00 

951. Wages 10,030.00 10,036.00 10,490.00 

952. Expenses 21. 350.00 7. 898.64 23.800.00 

$31,611.00 $18,159.64 $34,515.00 

Pumping Station 

953. Expenses $ 150.00 $ 119.81 $ 150.00 

954. Repairs & 

Maintenance 3.350.00 3.058.04 3.800.00 

$ 3,500.00 $ 3,177.85 $ 3,950.00 

Bond Service 

955. Bonds $ 5,500.00 $ 5,500.00 $ 5,000.00 

956. Interest 1.388.75 1.388.75 1.237.50 

$ 6,888.75 $ 6,888.75 $ 6,237.50 

TOTAL FOR WATER WORKS $41,999.75 $28,226.24 $44,702.50 



195 



WARRANT 

1958 

NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, 

MIDDLESEX, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said 
County : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify the legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified 
to vote in Town Meeting for the transaction of Town Affairs 
to meet in the Charles S. Smith School in said Lincoln, on 
Monday the seventeenth day of March next at 7:30 o'clock 
P. M. , then and there to act on the following articles 
except Article 1, and also to meet at the Charles S. Smith 
School on Saturday, the 22nd day of March next, at 12 
©•clock noon, then and there to act on the following 
Article 1, by posting a copy of this Warrant by you attested, 
in each of the Post Offices, and in some other public place 
in said Town seven days at least before the seventeenth 
day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Saturday, 
March twenty-second will be open at 12 o'clock noon and 
may be closed at 7 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in their votes for one member for 
each of the following offices: 

Town Clerk for one year. 

Selectman for three years. 

Assessor for three years. 

Treasurer for one year. 

Auditor for one year. 

School Committee for three years. 

Regional District School Committee for 

three years. 
Regional District School Committee for 

two years. 
Regional District School Committee for 

one year. 
Water Commissioner for three years. 
Board of Health for three years. 
Board of Health for two years. 
Tree Warden for one year. 

196 



WARRANT FOR 19 58 



Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 
Planning Board for five years. 
Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years. 
Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years. 
Director of DeCordova and Dana Museum for 

four years. 
Director of DeCordova and Dana Museum for 

one year. 

ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees, and other officers, required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 

ART ICLE 4 . To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be 
authorized to employ for additional compensation any of its 
members and to fix additional compensation of such members. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the 
necessary and expedient purposes of the Town or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipa- 
tion of the revenue of the financial year beginning January 
1, 1959, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable 
within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To determine whether the Town will vote to ' 
amend the Agreement and Declaration of Trust of the Town 
of Lincoln, dated April 2, 1956, which establishes the 
Lincoln Permanent Scholarship Fund, in accordance with the 



197 



WARRANT FOR 19 58 



terms of an instrument of amendment to the Trust, a copy 
of which has been deposited with the Town Clerk and made 
available for inspection by inhabitants of the Town, (said 
amendment providing for a change in the tenure of Members 
of the Scholarship Fund Committee) or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, a 
certain parcel of land now or formerly of Sumner Smith, 
located at the Northwest corner of Lincoln and Ballfield 
Roads, containing one and one-half acres more or less, 
raise and appropriate a sum of money therefor, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sel ec tmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 9. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
conduct services on Memorial Day the thirtieth of May, 
appoint a committee, raise and appropriate the sum of 
$200.00, or any other sum, or take any action relative 
thereto . 

Selec tmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 10. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
celebrate Independence Day, the fourth of July, appoint a 
committee, raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, or 
any other sum, or take any action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
(Finance Committee approves of a July 4th appropriation 
but believe expenditure for fire works should be reduced 
or el iminated . ) 

ARTICLE 1 1 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $750.00, or any other sum, for the 
purpose of transporting children to Lake Walden for Red 
Cross swimming classes, or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Recreation Committee 
(Finance Committee approves on same policy as in 1957) 



198 



WARRANT FOR 19 58 



ARTICLE 12. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,750.00, or any other 
sum, for the purchase of a Police Cruiser to replace ex- 
isting equipment, or take any action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 13 . To determine whether the Town will appropriate 
the sum of $12,500.00 for the construction of two addition- 
al tennis courts at the Ballfield, appoint a committee with 
full authorization to carry out said construction, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Recreation Committee 
(Finance Committee approves if funds are raised from 
taxation. ) 

ARTICLE 14. To determine whether the Town will approve 
the proposed action by the Library Trustees seeking to 
change the provisions under which the Town accepted as a 
gift in 1884 the parcel of land and building now used as 
a library so that the Town may have broader representation 
on the Board of Library Trustees and also so that the 
Chairman of the Selectmen and the Chairman of the School 
Committee will not be required to serve as Library Trustees, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Library Trustees 

ARTICLE 15. To determine whether the Town will accept as 
a public way the private road known as Acorn Lane, as 
shown on plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass., 
Rowland A. Barnes &, Company, Civil Engineers, dated October, 
1955'* and filed with Scnith Middlesex District Registry of 
Deeds as plan #2463 of 1955, recorded in Registry of Deeds 
Book #8644, Page 70, and approved by the Planning Board of 
the Town of Lincoln December 30, 1955, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

By Petition 

ARTICLE 16. To determine whether the Town will accept as 
a public way the private road known as Woodcock Lane, as 
shown on plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Lincoln, 
Massachusetts, owned by Olga Pertzoff", dated July 12, 1955, 
Everett M. Brooks Co., Civil Engineers, recorded with 
Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, Book #8692, End; 



199 



WARRANT FOR 19 58 



approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln, 
October 11, 1956, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

By Petition 

ARTICLE 17. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000.00 to be used by 
a Committee to be appointed by the Moderator to study 
further the building needs of the Lincoln Schools. 

School Committee 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 18. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
acquire by eminent domain, purchase or any other way, a 
certain additional parcel of land, now or formerly of 
Dorothy S. F. M. Codman, Roger B. Tyler, and Benjamin J. 
Fawcett, as they are Trustees under the will of Ogden 
Codman, contiguous to land located on the Westerly corner 
of the intersection of Lincoln and Codman Roads taken by 
the Town for fire and police station purposes pursuant to 
an order of taking dated January 14, 1957, and recorded 
with Middlesex South District Deeds Book #8890, Page 70, 
said additional parcel containing twenty-one thousand and 
ninety-seven (21,097) square feet, more or less; and raise 
and appropriate a sum of money therefor and for any addi- 
tional sum required to settle the petition of said Trustee! 
for damages allegedly resulting from the said taking dated 
January 14, 1957, or take any action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 19. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
establish a Stabilization Fund as provided under Chapter 
404 of the Acts of 1957, raise and appropriate a sum of 
money therefor, or take any action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 20. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
rescind the authority to issue the balance of fifty thous- 
and dollars ($50,000.00) in "bonds which remain unissued 
out of the loan of one hundred twenty-five thousand dol- 
lars ($125,000.00) authorized to be issued under Chapter 
44 of the Massachusetts General Laws, by action taken 



200 



WARRANT FOR 19 58 



under Article 2 of the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting 
held on May 6, 1957, or take any action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 21. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
accept the provisions of Chapter 489 of the Acts of 1956 
entitled "An Act Authorizing Pay-Roll Deductions on Account 
of Contributions to Community Chests or United Funds in 
the case of certain Town Employees", or take any action 
relative thereto. 

By Petition 

ARTICLE 22. To determine whether the Town will vote to 
accept Chapter 223 of the Acts of 1957 of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts (Section 8 of Chapter 40 of the General 
Laws) establishing a Conservation Commission, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 23. To determine whether the Town will appropriate 
$70,000.00, or some other sum, to construct an addition to 
the Public Library, authorize the borrowing of part or all 
of the amount so appropriated, and authorize the appoint- 
ment of a building committee, or take any other action in 
relation thereto. 

Library Building Committee 
(Finance Committee approves but it is expected a statement 
will be made at Town Meeting concerning the relationship 
of this expenditure to the debt limit of the Town.) 

ARTICLE 24. To determine whether the Town will authorize 
the Water Commissioners to purchase a new service truck 
for the Water Department, appropriate money therefor, or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 25. To determine whether the Town will authorize 
the Water Commissioners to purchase a new portable air 
compressor with complete equipment, appropriate money there 
for, or take any action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 
(Finance Committee approves) 



201 



WARRANT FOR 19 58 



ARTICLE 26. To determine whether the Town will authorize 
the Water Commissioners to replace with new 8" pipe cer- 
tain old sub-standard water mains in Concord Road near the 
Wayland line, Old Sudbury Road, and South Great Road, from 
the intersection of Codman Road to the Weston line, appro- 
priate money therefor, or take any action relative thereto 

Water Commissioners 
(Finance Committee approves) 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the 
time for the meeting aforesaid. Given under our hands 
this 17th day of February in the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and fifty-eight. 



Charles K. Fitts 
William T. King 
Elliott V. Grabill 

Selectmen of Lincoln 



202 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Report of the 



LONG-TERM CAPITAL 
REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 



1957 















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fa -H Z 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



LONG-TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 



Summary of Conclusions and Recommendations 

1. The Committee recommends a program of capital 
expenditures for the various departments of the town 
for 1957 totalling $242,100 and $11,000 for water. 
For the next five years, including 1957, the Committee 
recommends a program of approximately $1,175,000 
for general departmental capital expenditures, and 
$155,000 for water. Beyond five years no program 
has been outlined, but certain major expenditures 
have been noted (Table 1, opposite). 

2. This program of capital expenditures may involve a tax 
rate rise from $58.00 in 1956 to $71.00 in 1959 (Table 
6, page 10). 

3. The Committee is gratified by the increase in long range 
planning in the Town over the past year, but suggests 
that still more effort be devoted to this purpose. 



Introduction 

The Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee presents herewith its 
recommendations and forecast of capital expenditures for the coming year and 
a period beyond. As last year, the Committee has met with appropriate offi- 
cers, boards, and committees of the Town. The Committee is grateful to mem- 
bers of these bodies, and to officers of the Town, and to interested citizens who 
have supplied information and opinions. Responsibility for the recommendations 
however, belongs to the Committee alone. 

As in the previous report, the committee has made recommendations 
which, in its view, denote the minimum unavoidable level of expenditures the 
Town can anticipate. 

Emphasis has been put on the next five years, with a rough forecast of the 
major capital expenditures that can be expected in the ten year period following 
Expenditures beyond a five year period are difficult to predict with any reason- 
able degree of certainty. Indeed, it is difficult enough to predict the immediate 
five years. This is shown in Table 2, where actual expenditures for 1956 are 
compared with forecast expenditures as listed in the 1956 report of this com- 
mittee. The purpose of including the ten year period after 1961 is therefore to 
place before the Town the fact that it will be faced in the future with certain 
large, necessary and unavoidable capital expenses. While the figures are ap- 
proximate at best, they serve to point up certain areas of Town activities where 
appreciable capital outlay will be required. 

The estimates of future capital requirements in this report are based on 
the present value of the dollar. If inflation should continue in the future as it 
has in the past (construction costs rising roughly at the rate of 5% per year) 
these estimates will have to be revised upward. 

Capital Expenditures for 1956 

Table 2 sets forth the actual capital expenditures of the Town for 1956, 
along with the proposed expenditures as listed in the 1956 report of this Com- 
mittee. It will be noted that there are several discrepancies between what was 
expected and what was actually spent. 

The most notable difference is in the case of the Water Department. The 
large expenditure was required for replacement of the 4 inch main on Brooks 
Road, Old Cambridge Turnpike, and Route 2. The old pipe no longer furnished 
water to the houses at the end of Route 2. The necessity for replacement had 
come sooner than had been foreseen, and proved more expensive than had been 
envisaged on account of blasting through ledge. 

Other notable differences had been in 1) Highway expenditure, where the 
expenditure was $10,200 below expectation because of the inability to secure 
labor to carry out intended work, and Chapter 90 difficulties discussed below; 

2) Road machinery, where expenditure was $6,600 below expectation; and 

3) School addition no. 2 for payment of past obligations. The foregoing shows 



Table 2 



Town of Lincoln 



Actual and Proposed Capital Expenditures for 1956 



Actual 



Proposed 



General Government 

Protection of Persons & Property 
Police 
Fire 
Other 

Highways 

Chapter 90 Construction 
Machinery 

Elementary School 
Addition No. 2 
Elem. School Building Needs Comm. 

Library Committee 

Water Department 



$2,200 





1,100 


$1,500 
5,000 




1,500 






21,800 


32,000 




3,200 


9,800 




5,500 





lm. 


900 







200 


3,000 




46,700 


14,000 


TOTAL 


$83,100 


$65,300 



the difficulties of planning capital expenditures, in which the Town Officals and 
the Committee are gaining experience. 

Table 3 sets forth expenses for 1956, divided into current and capital out- 
lays, and receipts, relating capital expenditure to the general picture of the 
Town 1 s finances for 1956. 

Table 4 gives the Town' s debt position for 1956, along with assessed valu- 
ations and tax rate. 

Table 5 sets forth the annual cost of capital improvements for 1956 in 
terms of the cost of borrowed funds. 



In reading Tables 4 and 5 it should be observed that the Town will be aided 
in the repayment of its school debt by assistance from the Commonwealth 
amounting to approximately 30 per cent. This assistance is applied to the capital 
outlay of borrowing, not interest, generally in equal installments over 20 years. 
Because of the length of time over which it is received, and the necessity mean- 
while to pay interest, it is not appropriate to deduct it from the Town' s indebted- 
ness. 



Table 3 

Town of Lincoln - 1956 

Expenditures Divided Between Current and Capital Accounts, 
and Receipts (in thousands of dollars). 



Expenditures 

1. Selectmen' s orders $619.1 

2. Water Department 

current 31.3 

capital 46.7 

3. Total (1 + 2) 697.1 

4. Capital Expense 83.1 

5. Current Expense (3-4) 614.0 

Current Receipts 

6. Collector of Taxes 437.2 

7. from Commonwealth 

other than (9 +10) 144.4 

8. Other 31.4 

9. Chapter 90 Construction 13.5 

10. State Assistance for 

School Construction 17.9 

11. Extraordinary Capital Receipts 

12. Total (6 to 11) 644.4 

13. Water Department Receipts 43.1 

14. Total. Receipts (12 + 13) $687.5 



Table 4 



Town 


of Lincoln - 1956 


Debt, As 


sessments, Tax Rate 


(in thousands of dollars) 


Borrowings 


50.0 (by the Water Dept.) 


* Re payments 


40.0 


^Outstanding Debt 


473.5 


Assessment, Real and 




Personal Property 


6,817.3 


Tax Rate per $1000 


58.0 



Excluding repayment and debt of Regional School District, 
of which Lincoln 1 s "share" is approximately one-third. 



Table 5 

Town of Lincoln - Debt Service, 1956 

Debt Repayment $40,000 

Interest 9,162 

Total $49,162 



Detailed Recommendations 

The Committee recommends the general scope and character of capital 
expenditures set forth in Table 1. The committee presents the following de- 
tailed set of justifications for those items which are different from recommend- 
ations of last year. For justification of detailed items which are unchanged 
from last year, see the Committee Report for 1956. 

General Government 



There is no change for the recommended outlay of $10,000 for remodeling 
the Town offices, to be financed from current taxes. 

Protection of Persons and Property 

1. Police - In the previous report, replacement of police cars was con- 
sidered a capital outlay. It is believed, however, that annual replacement costs 
are more realistically an operating expense. Consequently, the item has been 
dropped from the report, except for future additions to the number of cars. 

2. Fire Station - In last year' s report, it was recommended that $5000 
be expended in 1956 and $95,000 in 1957 for a new fire station to be built on the 
Tracey site on Route 2. Because of the proposed relocation of Route 2, and the 
strong possibility of involving this general area, it was considered unwise to take 



any action at the Tracey site. An ad hoc committee has examined the question 
of necessity for a new station, and the possible location thereof. The present 
quarters for the fire apparatus at Doherty' s garage are cramped. Being ad- 
jacent to a paint and body shop, they lack the degree of safety requisite to the 
garaging of fire equipment. The Committee therefore supports the plan for 
immediate construction of a station at the corner of Codman and Lincoln Roads, 
on the site recently voted to be purchased by the Town. It further recommends 
that a sum of $100,000 be allocated in 1957 for the purpose. The expense is 
unavoidable. It must be financed through borrowing. For the future, the Town 
must plan on another $50,000 for a small fire station in North Lincoln, to be 
built after Route 2 has been relocated. Tentatively, the amount has been placed 
in the period 1962-72. 

3. Fire Equipment - Performance of the Town' s present fire apparatus 
indicates that a new pumper is needed immediately. In the past, the Town has 
purchased fire trucks primarily designed for forest fire work. The present 
residential valuation and future growth of the Town, with concomitant apparatus 
rating requirements, makes it desirable that the Town purchase a 750 G.P.M. 
pumper, with suitable modification for the Town' s special requirements (larger 
tank, high pressure pump) which will cost $17,500 in 1957. Several surround- 
ing towns have like pieces of equipment, so that the new engine will have the 
advantage of interchangeability. In 1958, $2000 will be needed for refurbishing 
one of the forest fire wagons bought in 1948, and in 1959 another $2000 will be 
needed for refurbishing the second such vehicle. These expenditures will 
broaden the flexibility of these two pieces of apparatus. Doing the work in suc- 
cessive years will enable the Fire Department to see how the modifications 
work out before the second vehicle is modified. With the foregoing, the depart- 
ment should be reasonably well equipped for a period beyond 1962. The expendi- 
tures here outlined are recommended by the Committee as being unavoidable. 

4. Civil Defense - The Committee has scheduled $4000, arbitrarily al- 
located to 1958, for such contingencies as may arise in the field of civil defense. 
In the absence of clarification of the need for any further civil defense expense, 
it is hard to pursue a rational policy of expenditure in this area. Capital expense 
for this purpose must be kept under constant review in the light of the developing 
situation. 

Health & Sanitation, Recreation 

1. Land Acquisition - The Committee on Parks and Playgrounds has no 
firm plans at present for the acquisition of sites or areas for the town. Our 
Committee believes., however, that the purchase of park, playground, watersheds 
or forest sites is desirable in the long-term interest of the Town, and therefore, 
has allocated the arbitrary figure of $30,000 in 1959, pending decision by the 
Town and formulation of specific plans. 

2. Tennis Courts - As noted in the 1956 report, the growth of the Town 
increased the desirability of an additional two tennis courts, now estimated to 
cost about $12,000. Because of the present uncertainty concerning final plans 
for the new Elementary School, it is not possible to pick a suitable site. At 



present. The Committee therefore recommends that the courts be considered 
for 1958, and that in the meantime the Planning Board review the over-all 
recreational situation of the Town. Pending such review the Committee makes 
no change in the opinions expressed in its report of 1956. 

Highways 

1. Road Improvement - In last year' s report the Committee made rather 
sizable allocations for road improvements, averaging about $40,000 per year. 

It appears the Town will be unable to employ Chapter 90 funds beyond 1957 be- 
cause of lack of projects and lack of labor. There has been consistent local 
opposition, on esthetic grounds and for reasons of safety, to the widening and 
straightening of scenic roads in the Town. For this reason, the Committee be- 
lieves that a more realistic level of expenditure is represented by the figure 
of $15,000 per year. This is an unavoidable expenditure, and probably repre- 
sents a minimum for prevention of deterioration of the road network. If the 
town is unwilling to accept Chapter 90 standards, it must seriously consider 
spending this amount of money from its own funds. 

2. Sidewalks, Parking - As noted in last year' s report, the Committee 
believes that a sidewalk between the Center and Smith Schools is desirable. The 
new school between these two locations lends urgency to this project. It also 
believes it is prudent for the Town to acquire additional parking area in South 
Lincoln. This was noted in the previous report. A sum of $10,000 has been al- 
located in 1959 for these purposes. 

3. Road Machinery - A complete breakdown of one of the heavy duty tracks 
purchased in 1946 has made it necessary to recommend the immediate purchase 
of a heavy duty truck at a net cost of $6,500. It is also necessary to replace the 
front end loader at a cost of $11,000, and considered advisable to trade the super- 
intendent' s pick up truck at a cost of $2,600. As a result of these changes, be- 
ginning in 1958, the average age of the equipment will be considerably reduced. 
The Committee believes the Town at that time should plan on a regular expendi- 
ture for replacement of machinery, and should raise and either spend or set 
aside for this purpose the sum of $10,000 per year. These figures are not es- 
sentially different in the long run from the figures in last year' s report. 
Neglecting to replace equipment regularly will result only in a greater cost in 

the long run, as noted in the appendix of the Committee' s 1956 report. The 
Committee recommends the foregoing expenditures as unavoidable. 

Schools 



1. Elementary School - The expanding school population, increasing at a 
rate well beyond the most generous forecasts, has necessitated a complete re- 
vision of the school building program. In last year' s report, it was recom- 
mended that the sum of $230,000 be allocated in 1958 to build seven classrooms. 
It was then expected that five more rooms, including two kindergarten rooms 
would be needed by the Fall of 1961, and would cost $165,000. Given the in- 
creased and more immediate need, the School Building Needs Committee 



finds that it would be more economical to build all twelve rooms at once. It is 
expected that the cost will be $475,000 above the $29,500 already appropriated 
for the site, to be financed from borrowing in 1957, rather than the $395,000 
anticipated for both steps last year. The School Building Needs Committee be- 
lieves this will satisfy the needs of the Town to the fall of 1962. The School 
Building Needs Committee has investigated the question of Federal aid to educ- 
cation, and finds that it would be of no advantage to the town to delay construc- 
tion. The Committee recommends these expenditures as unavoidable. 

2. Regional High School - It is estimated that one addition to the high 
school will be needed in each five year period, as noted in the 1956 report. The 
sum of $250,000 - $300,000 has been allocated to 1961, as the Regional High 
School Committee expects to be in the process of making plans or soliciting bids 
at that time. The additional sum of $220,000 has been allocated for the period 
of 1962-72. Both expenditures would be financed by borrowing. The foregoing 
are not essentially different from the figures presented in 1956. 

Library 

1. Addition - The needs of the library were set forth in detail in the 1956 
report of the Committee. The situation has not changed. The Library Additions 
Committee is working steadily, and expects to ask for funds in 1958. For this 
reason the expenditures previously allocated for 1957 have been shifted to 1958. 
Financing would be by borrowing. If a public spirited citizen were interested in 
making a contribution to the Town, either by gift or bequest, the needs of the 
library seem to merit particular attention. 

2. Clock - The Tower clock, which is mechanical, is maintained in good 
working order by the generous efforts of a citizen. It will be desirable eventu- 
ally to electrify the clock. 

Water Department 

1. Main Replacement - As noted in the beginning of this report, failure 
of an operating water main necessitated an immediate and large capital outlay 
for main replacement in 1956. This was financed by borrowing. While the Wate 
Department is not in a position to give the Committee a schedule of prospective 
main replacements, the Committee believes this task is important, and that the 
Water Department revenue is available for the purpose. We have therefore put 
capital outlays for the next five years for main replacement at $11,000, $13,000 
$15,000, $17,000, $19,000, or a total of $75,000 in the five year period, to be 
financed by current income. The Committee believes these expenditures are un 
avoidable, and should not be deferred. 

2. 16 in. Main and New Water Supply - The 16 inch main to the reservoir 
is operating satisfactorily for the present. Eventually it must be replaced, at ar 
estimated cost of $80,000. As noted in 1956, the Town must consider the possi 
bility of acquiring a new water supply in 10 to 15 years, at a possible cost of 
$500,000. Both of these items would, of necessity, be financed through borrowin 



Finance 

It is difficult to estimate the level of taxes implied in these capital ex- 
penditures. The Committee is not in position to make careful estimates of 
current expenditures, and can do little but extrapolate the past record - with 
most uncertain results. Much less can it estimate the Town' s share of 
Commonwealth tax receipts which is currently more than usually uncertain 
because of the proposed sales tax, the proceeds of which would be used to re- 
lieve the fiscal position of the cities and towns. An additional possibility is 
Federal aid for school construction, but the effect of this cannot be assessed. 

Despite these uncertainties, the Committee is disposed to repeat the 
exercise at forecast undertaken in its first report to afford the Town a very 
rough idea of the possible level of taxes implied by these rates of capital ex- 
penditure. The figures are alarming - in the vicinity of $70.00, - and reflect 
the effect of the necessity to push forward a number of projects in time, and 
particularly to anticipate the second step in elementary school building simul- 
taneously with the first step. 

In the light of these possible levels of taxation, the Committee can only 
urge that the Town weigh carefully the amount and timing of expenditures. 



Table 6 

TENTATIVE FORECAST OF LINCOLN TAX RATE, 
(in thousands of dollars) 



1958-1961 



Expenditures 


1956 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


Current Expense (incl. water) 
(ex debt service) 


564.8 


630.0 


670.0 


710.0 


750.0 


Service existing debt 


49.2 


51.5 


46.0 


45.5 


45.5 


Total 


614.0 


681.5 


716.0 


755.5 


795.5 


Capital expense (Table 1) 


83.1 


530.0 


67.0 


29.0 


300.0* 


Service Additional debt 





52.0 


51.0 


53.0 


74.0* 


TOTAL 


697.1 


1,263.5 


834.0 


837.5 


1,169.5 


Receipts 












Q 

Commonwealth, etc. 


127.6 


135.0 


140.0 


145.0 


150.0 


Other 


31.6 


38.0 


40.0 


42.0 


44.0 


Chapter 90 Construction 


13.5 


n.e. 


n.e. 


n.e. 


n.e. 


School Construction Assistance 


17.8 


17.3 


24.2 


16.7 


22. 7 ( 


Water Receipts 


43.1 


47.0 


49.0 


51.0 


53.0 


Borrowing (current) 


50.0 


62.0 


30.0 


-- 


275.0 


Borrowing (1957) 


-- 


425.0 


__ 


-- 


-- 


Total of above 


282.6 


724.3 


283.2 


254.7 


544.7 


Amount to be Raised by- 
Taxation 


437. 2 f 


539.2 


550.8 


582.8 


625.0 


Valuation 


6,817.3 


7,600 


8,000 


8,400 


8,800 



All the foregoing figures are subject to great uncertainty, except for the 
1956 actual data. Particularly uncertain are the magnitudes of current expendi- 
ture and of the Town' s share of Commonwealth receipts, now the subject of 
change due to the possible enactment of a sales tax. A Federal bill before the 
Congress also contemplates Federal aid to local school construction. If the 
present estimates, which extrapolate past trends, be taken as an indication of 
future orders of magnitude, with no allowance for changes possible through 
legislation, and if the real and personal valuations rise in some degree compar- 
able to that suggested, the level of capital expenditures contemplated in this 
report, together with other expenditures, implies tax rates as follows: 



Tax rate (in dollars per $1,000) 58.00 

a. Excluding service for Regional School 
Included in current expense 

b. Excluding state aid for Regional School 

c. Making no allowance for change in 
Commonwealth or Federal legislation 



70.00 



69.00 



69.00 



71.00 



d. Including Lincoln share of Re- 
gional School addition 

e. Including state aid to Regional 
School addition 

f. Amount actually raised. 



n.e. Not estimated. 



10 



Recommendations 

As before, the Committee believes that more attention should be given to 
long-term planning in the Town, both physical and financial. It notes with grati- 
fication that the amount and quality of long-term planning has improved consider- 
ably over the last year, but yet further improvement is needed. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee 




% 




William M. Rand, Chairman 



sLL*-4L 



/ 



William T. King 
for the Selectmen 






C. P. Kindleberger V William N. Page * 



Page 
for the Finance Committee 




d/^OUc&Z 



tA^U^t^L. 



M. E. Shank, Clerk 



Alan McClennen 

for the Planning Board 



11 



f! 



« ; 



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Hi 

wmmm 







mm 

mm.* 

mm 

iiifii; 



Mi 



■•PIPiiilll 










THE COVER 

The Town appreciates the 
excellent designing by the 
DeCordova Museum of the 
cover for this report. 



CONTENTS 

TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen .......... . 1 

Officers and Committees 9 

Town Clerk 19 

Licenses 38 

FINANCE 

Auditors 39 

Treasurer ■ 43 

Accounting Officer 47 

Collector of Taxes 69 

Board of Assessors 70 

PROTECTION OF LIVES 
AND PROPERTY 

Police Department 72 

Fire Department . . 74 

Tree Warden 75 

Civil Defense Agency 76 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 77 

Nursing Committee 79 

Board of Public Welfare 81 

Mosquito Control 82 

Inspector of Animals 83 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 84 

Board of Appeals . 99 

Building Code Board of Appeals * 100 

Highway Department 101 

Inspectors 102 

Water Commissioners 103 

Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee 104 

Cemetery Commissioners 105 

Hartwell School Building Committee 106 

School Needs Committee 107 

Land Conservation Trust 108 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

Library Trustees 109 

Library Addition Building Committee 116 

Recreation Committee 117 

Bemis Free Lectures 118 

DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park 119 

Lincoln Scholarship Fund 127 

Elementary Schools 128 

Regional School 144 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 157 

Valuation List 162 

Trust Funds 186 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 195 

WARRANT FOR 1959 206 



CALENDAR 

SELECTMEN — Every Monday of each month, 7:30 P. M. at the Town Hall, 
CLearwater 9-8850 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE — First Monday of each month, 8:00 P. M. at the 
Charles Sumner Smith School, CLearwater 9-9400 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS — First Wednesday of each month, 8:00 P M. at 
the Town Hall, CLearwater 9-8850 

WATER COMMISSIONERS — Meetings by appointment 

BOARD OF HEALTH -- Meetings by appointment; call Dr. Gordon 
Donaldson, CLearwater 9-8192 

BOARD OF APPEALS ~ Meetings by appointment; call Town Hall, 
CLearwater 9-8850 

PLANNING BOARD — Second Wednesday of each month, 8:00 P. M. at the 
Town Hall, CLearwater 9-8850 

Population — Estimated 3,500 in 1959 

Town Area — 8,572 acres 

1958 Tax Rate — $75.00 per $1,000 valuation 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -- First Monday in March after the fifteenth - 

March 16, 1959 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF TOWN OFFICERS — Saturday following Town Meeting, 

March 21, 1959 

Qualifications for Registration — Twelve months continuous 

residence in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
prior to March 16, 1959, and six months 
continuous residence in the Town of Lincoln 
prior to March 16, 1959 

Town Office -- Open Monday through Friday 8:30 A. M. to 

5:00 P. M. Closed on Saturdays 



Jveport 



of the Officers and Committees 



of the 



Csown of lolncoln 



FOR THE YEAR 1958 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Warren F. Flint 
Elliott V. Grabill 
Charles K. Fitts, Chairman 

Administration 

The organizational meeting of this Board was held on Monday, 
March 24th, at which time We welcomed our new member, Warren Flint, 
and elected Charles K. Fitts, Chairman. It is the duty of the select- 
men to appoint other officers and committees appearing in the front of 
the book, and in most instances these appointments were made at this 
meeting. 

In view of the fact that this Board has met every Monday, with 
few exceptions, we are changing the listing of regular scheduled 
meetings from the second and fourth Mondays to every Monday at 7:30 
P. M. 

Last year we reported the appointment of a committee to evaluate 
our present by-law and recommend changes in order to strengthen our 
form of Town Government. This committee has met with us many times 
and, as a result, a revised by-law will be presented to the Town Meet- 
ing in March. Prior to this presentation, meetings will be held 
with the officers and committees of the Town and a public hearing will 
be scheduled before March 16, 1959. 

Two conferences have been held with the postal authorities who 
are recommending the use of the South Lincoln postal facility as the 
only Post Office for Lincoln. Thus far their investigation indicates 
the availability of sufficient space at that location to accommodate 
present box holders using the center Post Office. If this was to 
materialize, Lincoln would have one Post Master, Mr. Davis, and two 
additional RFD routes would be established to serve North Lincoln and 
the center, thus eliminating existing Concord and Lexington RFD 
deliveries. There is little doubt that our service would be improved 
by this step. The Selectmen have agreed in principle, but have 
opposed the South Lincoln location due to inadequate parking areas 
adjacent to this building. Further conferences will be held on this 
subject. 

The selectmen are encouraged by the interchange of ideas related 
to all Town affairs. It has been gratifying to confer with the 

1 



SELECTMEN 

Planning Board, School Committee and many other officers during this 
past year. Although today's Town Government involves many complex 
problems, we are still of the opinion that the Town can best be served 
through the active participation of elected officers. We are there- 
fore not recommending changes in the present method of administration. 

We are indebted to Mrs. Elizabeth Causer, our Executive Secretary 
whose knowledgeable, untiring assistance is of immeasurable value to 
us. 

Town Hall 

Maintenance of the Town Hall included puttying and painting ex- 
terior sash and trim. In order to comply with the safety code, two 
new doors with panic release bars were installed at the rear exit 
serving the upper town hall. Other physical changes involved the 
re-location of Mr. Davis' office and occupancy of his former office 
by the Planning Board and the Board of Assessors. 

A large reference map has been painted on one of the walls in 
the hearing room* 

Interior painting of the lobby, entrance hall, and former se- 
lectmen's room is included in the maintenance schedule for 1959. It 
is our hope that a start can be made in modernizing the main electric 
panel board located in back of the stage in the upper town hall. 

We would like to see more town groups and organizations use the 
building for meetings and recreational purposes. 

Public Safety - Police 

Complete training of our department personnel was accomplished 
this year by the attendance of Officer McHugh at the State Police 
Academy in Framingham. Chief Algeo is taking advanced training in 
criminal law and Sergeant Maclnnis completed courses on juvenile re- 
habilitation at the Judge Baker School. 

Our policy regarding adequate night patrol requires that two 
men be assigned to cruiser duty. This patrol is essential to the 
routine checking of property and persons traveling the ways after dark 
The use of additional special police, working with a regular officer, 
is anticipated for 1959 in order to effect better investigation and 
the assignment of regular officers to traffic patrol and enforcement 
during peak daytime hours. Conditions in certain areas such as the 
shopping district and Lincoln Road are extremely hazardous at times 
and will require more police supervision. 

The selectmen have filed suggested speed zones with the Depart- 
ment of Public Works covering all through roads in the Town and we 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



hope to receive approval early in 1959. Zoning itself without en- 
forcement is meaningless and enforcement requires time in the appre- 
hension and prosecution. It is therefore hoped that with a shift of 
personnel more can be accomplished in this respect. 

Traffic during school opening and closing hours has come under 
the close watch of our two special police women and we strongly en- 
dorse the continuance of this type of patrol. 

Letters on file with us strongly indicate the sentiment of the 
Town as being opposed to major road widening and improvement; but 
needless to say, certain spots breeding eventual disaster must be 
altered for the safety of our children and the motorist. 

A five year pattern of traffic accidents within the Town has 
been filed with the Selectmen. From this report we are listing a 
few areas which show a high accident rate. 



Route 2, west of Bedford Road 
Route 2, east of Bedford Road 
Route 2, junction of Bedford Road 

Route 2A, west of Bedford Road 
Route 2A, east of Bedford Road 

Route 117, east of Codman Road 
Route 117, west of Codman Road 

Route 126, north of Route 117 
Route 126, south of Route 117 

Lincoln Road 

Trapelo Road 

Trapelo Road, junction of Old 
County Road 

Under Chief Algeo's direct supervision we have an alert, com- 
petent police force and our appreciation for the service they render 
is extended to them. 

Public Safety - Fire 

The Fire Department responded to 147 calls during the year. 
Although it is impossible to forecast the time demands of the Depart- 
ment, we feel the night coverage has added immeasurably to the prompt 
response of equipment and men during these normally hazardous hours. 



Accidents 


Injuries 


65 


69 


48 


71 


59 


70 


33 


40 


28 


25 


31 


42 


28 


24 


26 


13 


8 


4 


32 


28 


16 


8 


9 


12 



SELECTMEN 

On January 9. 1959, Chief Dougherty reaches the mandatory re- 
tirement age of seventy. Mr. Dougherty has served the fire-fighting 
forces of the Town for fifty years and has experienced the transition 
from the man-pulled hose reels of 1908 to the modern fire-fighting 
equipment of 1958. Although Chief Dougherty's retirement officially 
brings to an end this fifty years of service, his continued advice 
and counsel will be most welcome. 

The Selectmen have met with the officers and men of the Depart- 
ment in an effort to determine the position the Town should take in 
maintaining an adequate force. We feel that in re-organizing the 
officership of the Department we should consider present needs and 
future growth. In view of this, the Selectmen will abolish the 
Board of Engineers and appoint a Chief, Deputy Chief and two Captains 
who will have complete authority in all matters related to the Fire 
Department. Twenty-six call men will be appointed by the Selectmen 
upon the recommendation of the Chief. 

A spirit of helping one's neighbor is exemplified by the officers 
and men of this Department. Our appreciation for this service is 
extended to all of them. 

Fire and Police Buildings 

The occupancy of our new headquarters has brought greater co- 
ordination of our public safety facilities. Dormitory space provides 
for future permanent coverage as needed, and, in the meantime, is 
being used by the Fire Department night watch at the station from 
8:00 P. M. until 7:00 A. M. The separation of police and fire ser- 
vices enhances the individual requirements of both departments. 

The building has been viewed by many Towns facing similar needs. 
Their enthusiasm in this project is a credit to Mr. Robert Booth and 
other members of his building committee. We would like to express 
our appreciation for a job well done. 

Apparatus housed here included Engine # 1 (750) gallon pumper 
delivered in October, 1957, Engine #3 (500) gallon pumper delivered 
in the spring of 1947 and Engine #4 transferred to the Civilian De- 
fense this year. 

The selectmen are recommending renovation of the rented property 
at the junction of Route 2 and Bedford Road. Changes suggested would 
make it possible to maintain adequate coverage, when needed, replace 
present condemned heating system, and enlarge apparatus space sufficient- 
ly to handle equipment suitable for the protection of this area. 
Estimated costs indicate an expenditure of $3,850. would be necessary 
and we are negotiating a five-year lease based on retirement of this 
outlay during the term of the lease. The uncertainty of Route '2 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

makes it inadvisable to consider our property for this purpose and the 
need for adequate fire protection service at this location makes this 
move mandatory, in our opinion. 

Parks and Public Trees 

Following the pattern suggested in the 1957 report, a concen- 
trated effort has been made in area removal of diseased elms. This 
work has been accomplished in cooperation with the Tree Warden, High- 
way Department and the Department of Conservation, at the lowest per 
tree cost to date. 

We are legally required to appropriate the amounts appearing 
in items 140 and 141 of the Finance Committee's report, but in view 
of our cost experience and the need for more attention to our public 
trees, in general, we are recommending the sum of $4,000. be allocated 
for pruning, removal and planting. In conjunction with the Planning 
Board, we are recommending that a committee be appointed for the pur- 
pose of acting on a tree planting program and that $500. of the total 
be used for this purpose. 

With the addition of the Hartwell School and the increased needs 
for mowing and maintenance of Town properties, the Selectmen are 
studying the economical merits of owning equipment and the labor re- 
quirements involved in town operated maintenance of its parks. Plans 
for 1959 are based on contracting this work, as we have in the past. 

Highway Department 

Great emphasis was directed this year to re-surfacing many of 
the Town roads and the control of brush along our ways with the ob- 
jectivity of eliminating areas of poor visibility. The work in- 
cluded the following: 

Roads Re-Surf aced (Seal Coat) 

Giles Road Acorn Lane Pine Ridge Road 

Macintosh Lane Willarch Road Hillside Road 
Pierce Hill Road Tower Road 

(one strip) 

Roads Re-Surfaced (Mixed in Place) 

Sandy Pond Road (from Baker Bridge Road to Lincoln Center) 

Lexington Road (from Route 2 to Lexington line) 

Mill Street (from Lexington Road to north side of bridge) 



SELECTMEN 



Hot-Topped Areas 

Four corners at Lincoln and Codman Roads 

Parking area near railroad station 

Library Lane 

Old Lexington Road (extending 500 feet from Bedford Road) 

Area in front of Town Hall 

A hearing was held on a layout that would eliminate the tight 
corner on Bedford Road abutting the properties of Mrs. Monks and Miss 
Wheeler. This construction would alter the radius of this corner 
and include improvements in surface and drainage. The unused assign- 
ment of Chapter 718 funds, amounting to $14,029., has been requested 
for this project. 

The standards of the Commonwealth to which it is necessary to 
adhere if Chapter 90 construction allotments are to be granted to the 
Town are so different from the standards which appear to be acceptable 
to the Town, that there seems to be currently little likelihood of 
compromise. The approach of the Commonwealth requires that all such 
lay outs provide for wider surfacing, wider shoulders and greater 
drainage and slope easements to accommodate fairly heavy traffic. 
The feeling of the Town indicates that the construction of such roads 
is somewhat abhorrent to the desires of the townspeople who prefer 
the maintenance of our present roads and layouts insofar as it is 
possible and reasonably consistent with public safety. It has, 
accordingly, not been possible to obtain Chapter 90 grants for much of 
the needed road improvements. The grants that have been obtained 
have been confined to specific roads which have already been defined 
as Chapter 90 roads. 

Under these circumstances, the policy of the Selectmen is to 
deal with the most dangerous spot areas and gradually make improvements 

Special articles involving the replacement of the one and a half 
ton 1951 Ford truck and the acquisition of a small roller will be in- 
cluded in the 1959 warrant for the Town's consideration. 

We thank Mr. Maher and his men for an excellent job done this 
year. 

Hanscom Field on Base Housing 

Following the pattern of original negotiations with the Air 
Force dating back to December, 1955, the Selectmen, through Repre- 
sentative James DeNormandie, requested a bill be filed with the legis- 
lature granting ceding of the base housing properties to the Federal 
Government. With the assistance of Lt. Colonel Robert Wells, Judge 
Advocate of the Base, this bill was presented and signed into law 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

August 11th. Action in this matter was taken as soon as the final 
description of lands was clarified by the Air Force. 

As a result of a committee study and subsequent recommendation 
by the Attorney General of the United States, a presidential order was 
issued in April, 1957, altering policies that allowed the granting of 
federal jurisdiction over properties purchased or taken by government 
agencies. 

In order to effectively present the Town's position in this mat- 
ter, Representative DeNormandie, Mr. Grabill and Mr. Fitts twice con- 
ferred in Washington with appropriate agencies having jurisdiction in 
this case. We sincerely believe favorable action, in behalf of the 
Town, will be taken at this level. 

Since the close of the year, the Selectmen have been notified that 
the Federal Government is upholding the Town's position and has written 
to the Governor of the Commonwealth for the purpose of assenting to the 
Act passed by the General Court. The action of the Government was 
taken on the ground that understandings had been reached between the 
Town and the Government prior to the change in Federal policy in 1957. 

Since the beginning of the year 1959, following the Resolution 
passed by the Town at the Annual Town Meeting in 1957, the School Com- 
mittee and the Selectmen have been negotiating with the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare and with the personnel at the Bedford 
Airport to try to work out an arrangement which would be satisfactory 
to the Town and provide for the supervision by the School Committee of 
the elementary school to be located on the Airport. 

Among those who have contributed largely to the government of the 
Town, and, through their participation, have helped constitute the 
Town as it now is, are six distinguished citizens who are now re- 
tiring. 

SUMNER SMITH, who many might consider the first citizen of Lin- 
coln, is retiring from the Water Board after innumerable terms as 
Chairman. In addition to his service as a Water Commissioner, he has 
served the Town in many other ways, including many terms as a member 
of the Board of Selectmen. 

WILLIAM T. KING, now serving the Town as a commissioner of trust 
funds, was a member of the Planning Board from 1948 - 1953 and the 
Board of Selectmen from 1955 - 1958. His continuing interest in 
Town matters is appreciated by all of us who have had the pleasure of 
working with him. 

JOHN W. CARMAN, Chairman of the School Committee for nearly six 
years, has retired because of the necessity for him to follow his 



SELECTMEN 

business interests elsewhere. Service on the School Committee, 
particularly of recent years, frequently involves a certain amount of 
vigorous exploration of differing ideas. His wise counsel and 
balanced approach have been of great value to this Committee. 

ERNEST P. NEUMANN served two full terms or six years as a member 
of the School Committee. His service carried over two changes in 
the Superintendency and his counsel and initiative were of great value 
to the Town during a time of development in the educational system. 

ALAN McCLENNEN is retiring from the Planning Board after serving 
two full five year terms. The imprint of his professional approach 
and the impact of his ideas will remain with the Town a long while. 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY is retiring from the Fire Department as Chief 
after fifty years of service to the Town in many capacities. While 
he will always be known for his selfless service on the Fire Depart- 
ment, many associated with him will remember that he has been an 
active member and participant on five School Building Committees during 
the last twelve years. 

It is the strong feeling of the Selectmen that the Town can be 
preserved as a small local entity, maintaining the standard of amen- 
ities so desired by most of its inhabitants, only so long as interested 
and dedicated citizens devote uncounted hours of their time to working 
out the affairs of the Town together. 

From October to the Annual Town Meeting we are all conscious of 
this example in the application of endless hours applied by the Finance 
Committee in their meetings with the various boards, committees and 
officers of the Town, to the end that an intelligent, understandable 
budget can be presented at the Town Meeting. 

The heritage of our Town and the guardianship required to pre- 
serve it is vested in all voters of the Town. Final direction by 
your officers, to a large measure, is a result of this overall inter- 
est in Town matters. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 

Term Expires 
MODERATOR 
Donald P. Donaldson 1960 

TOWN CLERK 
William H. Davis 1959 

SELECTMEN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Charles K. Fitts, Chairman 1959 

Elliott V. Grabill 1960 

Warren F. Flint 1961 

ASSESSORS 

Frederick H. Greene, Jr., Chairman 1961 

William H. Rand, Jr 1960 

Elmer H. Ziegler 1959 

TREASURER 
Frederick B. Taylor 1959 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
William H. Davis 1959 

AUDITOR 
Louis C. Farley, Jr. 1959 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Perry J. Culver, Chairman 1961 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 1960 

John W. Carman (Resigned) 1959 

C. DeWitt Smith (Appointed) 1959 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Sumner Smith, Chairman 1959 

Edward S. Taylor 1960 

Russell P. Mahan 1961 

TREE WARDEN 
Albert S. Brooks 1959 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Gordon A. Donaldson, Chairman .... 1961 

Lucy E. Bygrave 1960 

Walter L. Hill (Resigned) 1959 

William Halsey (Appointed) 1959 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

Term Expires 
REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Kenneth Bergen 1959 

Ellen DeN. Cannon 1960 

Victor A. Lutnicki 1961 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

H. Arnold MacLean, Chairman 1961 

Warren F. Flint 1960 

James DeNormandie 1959 

PLANNING BOARD 

Katharine S. White, Chairman 1960 

Walter F. Bogner, Clerk „ .. 1961 

Alan McClennen 1959 

George H. Kidder 1962 

Paul Brooks . 1963 

MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK 

Albert S. Brooks 1959 

C. Lee Todd 1959 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

William T. King, Chairman 1960 

Richard F. Schroeder . . 1959 

Clement C. Sawtell 1961 

TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND FOR FREE PUBLIC LECTURES 

Christopher W. Hurd, Chairman 1961 

Paul Brooks 1960 

Mabel H. Todd 1959 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 
Life Trustees 

Edwin M. Cole, Chairman 

Alice G. Meriam 

Roland C. Mackenzie 

A. Bradlee Emmons (appointed by the Selectmen) .... 1960 
Morley M. John (appointed by joint School Committees) . 1961 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
A Directors 

John Quincy Adams I960 

Paul W. Cook, Jr 1959 

A. Bradlee Emmons 1961 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 1962 



10 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
B Directors 

Stanley Heck (appointed by Library Trustees) 

George Wells (appointed by Selectmen) 

William N. Swift (appointed by School Committee) . . . 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ACCOUNTING OFFICER AND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
M. Elizabeth Causer 

PUBLIC WELFARE AGENT 
M. Elizabeth Causer 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 
Raymond Maher 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Leo J. Algeo 

POLICE OFFICERS 

Lawrence P. Hal let t 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 

Frank W. Gordon, Jr 

Michael McHugh 

CONSTABLES 

Leo J. Algeo 

Lawrence P. Hallett 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 

DOG OFFICERS 

Leo J. Algeo 

Lawrence P. Hallett 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Andrew J. Dougherty 

MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 
Albert Brooks 

PETROLEUM INSPECTOR 
Andrew J. Dougherty 



Term Expires 



1961 
1960 
1959 



1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 



1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 



1959 
1959 
1959 



1959 
1959 
1959 



1959 
1959 
1959 



11 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



SPECIAL POLICE 



John T. Algeo 
Robert H. Booth 
Jeanette Bradley 
Floriy Campobasso 
Joseph Campobasso 
John Ciraso 
John Cook 
Joseph Cotoni 
Elaine Courtney 
Alan Crockett 
William Dean 
James DeNormandie 
William Doherty 
Andrew J. Dougherty 
Henry Draper 
Charles K. Fitts 
Warren F. Flint 
Francis T. Gilbert 
John T. Gilbert 



Term Expires 

Elliott V. Grabill 
Ernest L. Johnson 
Frank Gordon, Sr. 
William T. King 
Harry B. Knowles, Jr. 
Harry B. Knowles, 3rd 
Karl F. Lahnstein 
Edward D. Rooney 
D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 
Carl Smith 
Francis J. Smith 
Sumner Smith 
David Spooner 
Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr. 
Henry Warner 
William Whalen 
Orrin C. Wood 



FIRE ENGINEERS 

Andrew J. Dougherty 1959 

Frank W. Gordon 1959 

William M. Dean 1959 

FOREST WARDEN 
Andrew J. Dougherty 1959 

DEPUTY FOREST WARDEN AND TRAINING OFFICER 
William M. Dean . . 1959 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Eveleth R. Todd 1959 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
William M. Dean 1959 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
William M. Dean 1959 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
Daniel J. Murphy 1959 

WIRING INSPECTOR 
William M. Dean 1959 



12 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

CONSERVATION COMMITTEE 

Charles P. Kindleberger 

John B. French 

Quincy Wales 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

John W. White (Resigned) . 

Charles Y. Wadsworth (Appointed) 

William N. Swift 

Warren F. Flint (Resigned) 

Hans Van Leer 

Thomas B. Adams 

Henry B. Hoover 

Betty L. Lang, Associate Member 

James Jagger 

BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 

Lawrence B. Anderson, Chairman 

Stephen Herthel 

William A. Halsey 

Associate Members 

Robert Bygrave .... 

Walter Belanger 

Donald Loveys 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Man ley B. Boyce 

Henry J. Davis (Deceased) 

Andrew J. Dougherty 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk, ex officio 

MEMBER OF DISTRICT NURSING COMMITTEE 
Louise H. McClennen 

FENCE VIEWERS 

George G. Tarbell 

Guilbert Winchell 

FIELD DRIVERS 

Richard Bailey 

Richard Paige 

SURVEYOR OF CORD WOOD 
Albert Brooks , . . . 



Term Expires 

1959 
1959 
1959 



1962 
1962 
1961 
1961 
1960 
1959 
1963 

1959 
1960 



1960 
1959 
1961 



1959 
1959 
1959 



1961 
1960 
1959 
1959 



1959 



1959 
1959 



1959 
1959 



1959 



13 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Albert Avery, III, Chairman 

John M. Barnaby 

Mary Belanger , 

Ruth Burk " 

John B. Garrison 

Ernest L. Johnson 

Joseph B. Kessell 

Elin Lennon 

James W. Mar 

Earle B. Street 

VETERANS' AGENT 
Joseph Campobasso 

ROADSIDE BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 

Alice Smith 

Anne Black 

Mabel H. Todd 

Louise H. McClennen 

Freda Osborne 



Term Expires 

1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 



1959 



1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 
1959 



BUILDING CODE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Walter L. Hill (Resigned) 
Stanley D. Porter (Appointed) 



Frederick B. Taylor 



BY-LAW COMMITTEE 



Charles Y. Wadsworth 



Ernest L. Johnson 
George H. Kidder 

Kenneth Bergen 



EXECUTIVE BOARD OF THE COMMUNITY COUNCIL 
AT BEDFORD AIR BASE 



Sumner Smith 
Anthony Faunce 



F. Marsena Butts 
George G. Tarbell 
William M. Rand 
Robert H. Booth 



INSURANCE COMMITTEE 



William M. Rand 



Ernest Fuller 



George G. Tarbell, Jr. 
SELECTMEN'S CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 



Sumner Smith 
Malcolm Donaldson 
James DeNormandie 
Arthur E. Thiessen 



LEGAL ADVISOR 



John W. White 



14 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



TOWN HISTORIAN 



Edith B. Farrar (Resigned) 
Richard Bailey (Appointed) 



Name 
Stuart B. Avery 
Edith Bogner 
George A. Browning, Jr. 
Warren Carstensen 
Robert T. Church 
Robert P. Condi t 
Dorothy B. Crawford 
Elinor S. DeFord 
Elizabeth H. Doherty 
Eliot DuBois 
Harold W. Foley 
Norman W. Fradd 
Mary H. Grades ki 
Frederick W. Greer 
Russell Haden, Jr. 
Maurice K. Herlihy 
Stephen W. Herthel 
Harrison Hoyt 
Lucretia B. Hoover 
Eliot Hubbard, 3rd 
Irma Kistiakowsky 
Emily K. Kubik 
James V. Lennon 
Harold S. Liddick 
Galen D. Light, Jr. 
John F. Loud 
Donald C. Loveys 
Valentine Maroni 
Varnum R. Mead 
F. Spencer Martin, Jr. 
John Meyer 
Ann Monks 
Lawrence Moore 
Ethan A. Murphy 
David D. Ogden 
Eleanor A. Pallotta 
Catherine A. Rowe 
Clement C. Sawtell 
Mary C. Van Leer 
Leslie M. Willard 



JURY LIST, 1958 

Residence 
Lincoln Road 
Woods End Road 
Conant Road 
Old Concord Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Concord Road 
Weston Road 
Weston Road 
Tower Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Mill Street 
Grasshopper Lane 
Sandy Pond Road 
Huckleberry Hill 
Weston Road 
South Great Road 
Concord Road 
Huntley Lane 
Trapelo Road 
Winter Street 
South Great Road 
Lincoln Road 
Lincoln Road 
Juniper Ridge 
Giles Road 
Woods End Road 
Hillside Road 
Trapelo Road 
Tower Road 
Lincoln Road 
Juniper Ridge 
Bedford Road 
Trapelo Road 
Pierce Hill Road 
Trapelo Road 
Winter Street 
Winter Street 
Tower Road 
Old Sudbury Road 
Giles Road 



Occupation 
Civil Engineer 
Housewife 
Farmer 
Retail Fuel 
Port Engineer 
Manufacturer 
Housewife 
Housewife 
Housewife 
Engineer 
Investments 
Physical Director 
Housewife 
Manufacturer 
Production Engineer 
As st. Manager 
General Manager 
As st. Manager 
Housewife 
Buyer 
Housewife 
Housewife 
Accountant 
Chemist 

As st. Off. Mgr. 
Investment Counsel 
Construction 
Housewife 
Salesman 

Business Research 
Engineer 
Housewife 
Executive 
Instructor 
Investments 
Housewife 
Real Estate 
Banking 
Housewife 
State House 



Appointed June 16, 1958 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



15 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

Term Expires 
APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 
Ann E. Paddock 1959 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

COMMUNITY NURSE 
Marian N. Ober 1959 

BURIAL AGENT 
William H. Davis . 1959 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Andrew J. Dougherty 1959 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

F. Winchester Denio, Chairman 1960 

John B. Tew 1959 

Paul L. Norton 1959 

Leonard C. Larrabee 1960 

William N. Page 1961 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

Harold L. Cunningham 1959 

Corinne MacLean 1959 

Geraldine Todd 1959 

William B. Whalen 1959 

Rev. Charles M. Styron 1959 

FOURTH OF JULY COMMITTEE 

Thelma W. Cibel 1959 

Gertrude W. Fitts ; 1959 

William L. Grinnell 1959 

E. Donlan Rooney 1959 

George A. Wood, Jr 1959 

LIBRARY ADDITION COMMITTEE 
Morley M. John Secor Browne 

Charles A. Bliss Kenneth W. Bergen 

A. Bradlee Emmons, Chairman (Resigned) 



16 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



VETERANS' MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 



Leo J. Algeo 
Clifford W. Bradley 
Edward J. Chisholm 



Andrew J. Dougherty 
E. Don Ian Rooney 
William Whalen 



LONG-TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 
Maurice Shank William M. Rand (Resigned) 

Charles P. Kindleberger, Chairman Ernest Leathern 



FIRE STATION PLANS COMMITTEE 



Leo J. Algeo 
Robert H. Booth 



Andrew J. Dougherty 
William N. Swift 



Ernest Johnson 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 



(Hartwell School) 



Andrew J. Dougherty 
Ernest P. Neumann 



Gerard C. Henderson, Jr. 
Elizabeth J. Snelling 



George H. Kidder 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL NEEDS COMMITTEE 



Andrew J. Dougherty 
Helen Gilfoy 



Eugene Mellish 

Gerard C. Henderson, Jr. 



William N. Swift 



APPOINTED BY EAST MIDDLESEX MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMISSION 
MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMISSIONER 



David L. Garrison 



APPOINTED BY THE CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 



MEMBERS OF AUXILIARY POLICE FORCE 



Walter Belanger 
Walter Bonia 
Sheldon A. Briggs 
Secor Browne 
Stanley Cibel 
Robert C. Day 
Allen Dougherty 
Richard J. Eaton 
Warren F. Flint 
Donald A. Gilfoy 
Lowell Hollingsworth 
Eliot Hubbard, 3rd 
Medford E. Huntley 
David Kirkpatrick 



John W. McLellan 
Thomas ft. Morse 
W. Newton Nelson 
Foster Nystrom 
William Powers 
Roland W. Robbins 
Allston Riley 
Charles A. Snelling 
Howard Snelling 
Henry Sturm 
Didrick Tonseth 
Robert Thorson 
John B. Warner 
G. Arnold Wiley 



17 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Harold Lawson Edwin L. Williams 

Charles MacFarland Arthur Witham 

H. Arnold MacLean Henry Woods 

James W. Mar Thomas K. Worthington 

Gerald Fahringer 



18 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



TOWN CLERK 

William H. Davis 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. His duties include 
recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections, and notify- 
ing the Selectmen and other officers concerned of appropriations which 
have been voted. 

The record of Registered Voters of Lincoln is kept at the Clerk's 
office. Persons wishing to become voters in the Town should com- 
municate with the Clerk. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 17, 1958 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. Donald P. Donaldson, at 7:30 o'clock P.M. 
The return of the Warrant was read, and Reverend Morris R. Robinson 
opened the meeting with prayer. The Moderator then called attention 
to Article 1 (Election of Officers), and the following business was 
transacted: 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, com- 
missioners, trustees, and other officers required by law to be elected 
by ballot, or otherwise. 

Voted : That Albert Brooks and C. Lee Todd be elected 
Measurers of Wood and Bark for the ensuing year. 

Mr. Fitts then called attention to the long and faithful service 
of Mrs. Farrar as Librarian (27 years) and as recognition presented 
her with a purse and a television set. There was loud and pro- 
longed applause. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Voted: That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 
and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, be accepted; and the 
reports of the following Committees be accepted as interim reports, 
and that the Committees and their unexpended appropriations be con- 
tinued: Fire and Police Building Construction Committee, Elementary 
School Construction Committee, Capital Requirements Committee, Library 
Building Committee. 

Article 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 
officers of the Town, and to determine whether any Department, Board 
or Committee shall be authorized to employ for additional compensation 



19 



TOWN MEETINGS 

any of its members, and to fix additional compensation of such members. 

Voted: That the salaries of the elected officers of the 

Town for the current year be fixed at the following amounts respective- 
ly: 

Selectmen, each $200.00 

Treasurer 200.00 

Collector of Taxes 2,000.00 

Town Clerk 450.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 
Assessors, other 

members, each 175.00 
Water Commissioners, 

each 75.00 

Tree Warden 200.00 

Article 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary 
and expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: That under Article 5 of the Warrant for this Meet- 
ing the Town appropriate for the 1958 fiscal year each of the several 
separate sums as listed and numbered in the printed Schedule attached 
to the Report of the Finance Committee recommending the same, appear- 
ing on pages 187 to 195, inclusive, of the Town of Lincoln 1957 Report, 
except that the several following final amounts shall be appropriated 
in substitution for the recommended appropriations bearing the same 
numbers in said printed Report: 

Item No . Increase Final Amounts 

403 Veterans' Services $900.00 $1,000.00 

502 Elementary School 

Instruction 2,500.00 198,822.00 

904 Town Reports 42.58 1,342.58 

and further that all appropriations adopted by this vote be raised by 
taxation except as follows: 

(1) Appropriation #905, Reserve Fund, shall be taken from 
Overlay Surplus account, any balance at the year's end to be returned 
to that source. 

(2) All of appropriations #950 to #956, inclusive, to be 
taken from Water Works Treasury; and 

(3) As to the seven following appropriations, respecting 
which said Schedule contains notations as to the application of funds 
thereto from various sources, funds from such sources shall be applied 
against the respective appropriations in the manner and to the extent 
respectively indicated in said Schedule and only the balance, if any, 
shall be raised by taxation: 

Number Title 

210 Garbage Collection 

320 Chapter 90 Maintenance 

321 Chapter 90 Construction 
506 Elementary School Outlay 



20 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Number Title 

520 Library Salaries 

807 Water Works Bonds 

808 Interest on Water Works Bonds 

Article 6. To determine whether the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning January 1, 1959, and to issue a note or notes therefor, pay- 
able within one year and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 17, 
Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Voted: That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen be authorized to borrow money from time to time in anticipa- 
tion of the revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1959, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and 
to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than 
one year, in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 7. To determine whether the Town will vote to amend 
the Agreement and Declaration of Trust of the Town of Lincoln, dated 
April 2, 1956, which establishes the Lincoln Permanent Scholarship 
Fund, in accordance with the terms of an instrument of amendment to 
the Trust, a copy of which has been deposited with the Town Clerk and 
made available for inspection by inhabitants of the Town (said amend- 
ment providing for a change in the tenure of Members of the Scholar- 
ship Fund Committee), or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Agreement and Declaration of Trust, dated 
April 2, 1956, establishing the Lincoln Permanent Scholarship Fund, be 
amended, in accordance with the terms of an instrument of amendment, 
a copy of which is in possession of the Town Clerk (said amendment 
providing for a change in the tenure of Members of the Scholarship 
Fund Committee), and that the Selectmen be and they hereby are author- 
ized and directed to sign, acknowledge, and affix the Town Seal in the 
name and on behalf of the Town of Lincoln to said instrument of amend- 
ment. 

Article 8. To determine whether the Town will vote to acquire 
by eminent domain, purchase or any other way, a certain parcel of land 
now or formerly of Sumner Smith, located at the northwest corner of 
Lincoln and Ballfield Roads, containing one and one half acres more or 
less, raise and appropriate a sum of money therefor or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be and they hereby are authorized 
and empowered in the name and on behalf of the Town to acquire in fee 
by eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, for school or other 
authorized purposes, a certain parcel of land in Lincoln on the north- 
westerly corner of Lincoln and Ballfield Roads, containing one and 
fifty-six hundredths acres, more or less, as shown on a plan entitled 



21 



TOWN MEETINGS 

"Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. To Be Conveyed to the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Lincoln", dated March, 1958, Snelling, Hilton and Assoc- 
iates, to be recorded with said Middlesex South Registry of Deeds, 
bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a drill hole on the southwesterly corner of the 
premises; thence running by land of the Town of Lincoln by two 
courses N. 60° 30' 00", two hundred fifty one and thirty-six hund- 
redths feet (251.36) and N. 43° 19' 30" W. , one hundred five and fifty- 
two hundredths (105.52) feet to a brook; thence turning and running 
northeasterly along the course of said brook one hundred forty-three 
and five tenths feet (143.5), more or less, to land of the Estate of 
Harold S. Cousins; thence turning and running by said Estate land 
S. 68 44' 43" E., three hundred seventy-two and fifty hundredths 
feet (372.50) to Lincoln Road; thence S. 31° 14' 30" W. two hundred 
twenty and seventy-eight hundredths feet (220.78) to the drill hole 
at the point of beginning; and that there be and there is hereby 
appropriated from available funds in the Treasury for said purposes 
the sum of thirty-five hundred dollars ($3,500.00). 

Article 9. To determine whether the Town will vote to conduct 
services on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, appoint a committee, 
raise and appropriate the sum of $200.00, or any other sum, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Moderator be authorized to appoint a com- 
mittee of five to plan and carry out exercises on Memorial Day, the 
thirtieth of May next, and that the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $200.00 for the use of such Committee in connection with the 
exercises. 

Article 10. To determine whether the Town will vote to celebrate 
Independence Day, the fourth of July, appoint a committee, raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, or any other sum, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Moderator be authorized to appoint a com- 
mittee to plan and execute a celebration for Independence Day, the 
fourth of July, and that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,000.00 for the use of said Committee. 

Article 11. To determine whether the Town will vote to appro- 
priate the sum of $750.00 or any other sum for the purpose of trans- 
porting children to Lake Walden for Red Cross swimming classes, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $750.00 for 
the use of the Recreation Committee to provide transportation to the 
Red Cross Swimming Classes at Walden Pond, said sum of $750.00 to be 
taken from free cash and repaid to the Town, if and when collected 
from the children transported. 

Article 12. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $1,750.00, or any other sum, for the pur- 

22 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

chase of a Police Cruiser to replace existing equipment, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,400.00 for the purchase of a police car to replace existing equip- 
ment. 

Article 13. To determine whether the Town will appropriate the 
sum of $12,500.00 for the construction of two additional tennis 
courts at the Ballfield, appoint a committee with full authorization 
to carry out said construction, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: That the sum of $12,500.00 be raised and appro- 
priated for the construction of two additional tennis courts at the 
Ball Field, and that the Moderator appoint a committee of three which 
shall have full power and authority within the limits of said 
$12,500.00 to construct said tennis courts. Yes, 292; No, 230. 

Article 14. To determine whether the Town will approve the 
proposed action of the Library Trustees seeking to change the pro- 
visions under which the Town accepted as a gift in 1884 the parcel of 
land and building now used as a library, so that the Town may have 
broader representation on the Board of Library Trustees, and also so 
that the Chairman of the Selectmen and the Chairman of the School 
Committee will not be required to serve as Library Trustees, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Voted: (unanimously) That the Town approve the proposed action 
by the Library Trustees seeking to change the provisions under which 
the Town accepted as a gift in 1884 the parcel of land and building 
now used as a Library, so that the Town may have broader representa- 
tion on the Board of Library Trustees, and also that the Chairman of 
the Selectmen and the Chairman of the School Committee will not be 
required to serve as Library Trustees, and Resolved: That it is the 
sense of the meeting that there be added one or more Library Trustees 
elected by the Town. 

Article 15. To determine whether the Town will accept as a 
public way the private road known as Acorn Lane, as shown on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. Rowland A. Barnes & Company, 
Civil Engineers, dated October, 1955" and filed with South Middlesex 
District Registry of Deeds as plan #2463 of 1955, recorded in Registry 
of Deeds Book #8644, Page 70, and approved by the Planning Board of 
the Town of Lincoln, December 30, 1955, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Voted: That subject to the receipt of a deed under easement 
in form satisfactory to the Selectmen the Town accept as a public way 
the private road known as Acorn Lane, as shown on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass., Rowland A. Barnes & Company, Civil 
Engineers, dated October, 1955" and filed with South Middlesex Registry 
of Deeds as plan #2463 of 1955, recorded in Registry of Deeds Book 



23 



TOWN MEETINGS 

#8644, Page 70, and approved by the Planning Board of the Town of 
Lincoln December 30, 1955. 

Article 16. To determine whether the Town will accept as a pub- 
lic way the private road known as Woodcock Lane, as shown on a plan 
entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, owned 
by Olga Pertzoff", dated July 12, 1955, Everett M. Brooks Co., Civil 
Engineers, recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, 
Book 8692, End; approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln, 
October 11, 1956, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That subject to the receipt of a deed under ease- 
ment, in form satisfactory to the Selectmen, the Town accept as a 
public way the private road known as Woodcock Lane, as shown on a plan 
entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, owned 
by Olga Pertzoff", dated July 12, 1955, Everett M. Brooks Co., Civil 
Engineers, recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, 
Book #8692, End; approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln 
October 11, 1956. 

Article 17. To see whether the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000.00 to be used by a committee to be ap- 
pointed by the Moderator to study further the building needs of the 
Lincoln Schools. 

Voted: That the Moderator appoint a committee to study the 
building needs of the elementary schools, and make its recommendation 
to the Town, and that the sum of $5,000.00 be appropriated for the use 
of this committee for its study and in developing plans and cost esti- 
mates, if required, said sum to be taken from free cash. 

Article 18. To see whether the Town will vote to acquire by 
eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, a certain additional par- 
cel of land, now or formerly of Dorothy S.F.M. Codman, Roger B. Tyler, 
and Benjamin J. Fawcett, as they are Trustees under the will of Ogden 
Codman, contiguous to land located on the westerly corner of the 
intersection of Lincoln and Codman Roads, taken by the Town for fire 
and police station purposes pursuant to an order of taking dated 
January 14, 1957, and recorded with Middlesex South District Registry 
of Deeds, Book #8890, Page 70, said additional parcel containing 
twenty-one thousand and ninety-seven (21,097) square feet, more or 
less; and raise and appropriate a sum of money therefor and for any 
additional sum required to settle the petition of said Trustees for 
damages allegedly resulting from the said taking dated January 14, 
1957, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be and they hereby are authorized 
and empowered in the name and on behalf of the Town to acquire in fee, 
by eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, as a site for a com- 
bined police and fire station, a certain additional parcel of land in 
Lincoln, Massachusetts, contiguous to land located on the westerly 
corner of the intersection of Lincoln and Codman Roads, originally 



24 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

acquired by the Town for the same purpose by an order of taking dated 
January 14, 1957, and recorded with Middlesex South Registry of Deeds, 
Book #8890, Page 70, said original and additional parcels being shown 
on a plan entitled "Plan Showing Extra Land to be Acquired by the Town 
of Lincoln in Lincoln, Mass., Owned by Dorothy S.F.M. Codman, Roger B. 
Tyler, and Benjamin T. Fawcett, Trustees Under the Will of Ogden Cod- 
man", dated February, 1958, Snelling, Hilton and Associates, to be 
recorded with said Middlesex South Registry of Deeds, bounded and des- 
cribed as follows: 

Beginning at an iron pin on the northwesterly side of said Lin- 
coln Road, thence running along said Lincoln Road S. 56° 52' 00" W. 
two hundred one and ten hundredths (201.10) feet to a corner at re- 
maining land of said Dorothy S.F.M. Codman et als as Trustees; thence 
turning and running by said remaining land N. 33° 08' 00" W. three 
hundred eighteen and thirty hundredths (318.30) feet to a corner at 
said remaining land; thence turning and running by said remaining land 
N. 54° 13' 10" E. two hundred fifty-seven and forty-three hundredths 
(257.43) feet to said Codman Road; thence turning and running along 
said Codman Road by two courses S. 35° 46' 50" E. two hundred twenty- 
three and fourteen hundredths (223.14) feet and S. 35° 53' 25" E. 
thirty-seven and thirty-six hundredths (37.36) feet to a point for- 
merly marked by a bound; thence turning and running along a curve with 
a radius of sixty-eight and nineteen hundredths (68.19) feet southerly 
and southwesterly one hundred eight and ninety hundredths (108.90) 
to the iron pin at the point of beginning; containing a total of 
84,803 square feet more or less, as just described, less the said 
original parcel containing 58,903 square feet, more or less, so that 
said additional parcel hereunder acquired will contain 25,900 square 
feet more or less; and that there be and there is hereby appropriated 
from available funds in the Treasury the sum of Two Thousand Five 
Hundred and Fifty Dollars ($2,550) for the acquisition of said addi- 
tional parcel and also to settle the petition of said Trustees for 
damages allegedly resulting from the taking of said original parcel 
on January 14, 1957. 

Article 19. To determine whether the Town will vote to establish 
a Stabilization Fund as provided under Chapter 404 of the Acts of 
1957, raise and appropriate a sum of money therefor, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Under this article a motion that the Town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $7,500.00 for the purpose of establishing a Stabilization 
Fund, under Chapter 404 of the Acts of 1957, was lost. 

Article 20. To determine whether the Town will vote to rescind 
the authority to issue the balance of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) 
in bonds which remain unissued out of the loan of one hundred twenty- 
five thousand dollars ($125,000), authorized to be issued under 
Chapter 44 of the Massachusetts General Laws, by action taken under 
Article 2 of the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting held on May 6, 



25 



TOWN MEETINGS 

1957, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town rescind the authority to issue the 
unissued balance of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000.00) in bonds out 
of the loan of one hundred twenty-five thousand dollars ($125,000.00) 
authorized pursuant to Chapter 44 of the Massachusetts General Laws by 
action taken under Article 2 of the Warrant for the Special Town Meet- 
ing held May 6, 1957. 

Article 21. To determine whether the Town will vote to accept 
the provisions of Chapter 489 of the Acts of 1956 "An Act Authorizing 
Pay-Roll Deductions on Account of Contributions to Community Chests 
or United Funds in the case of certain Town Employees" or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) That the Town accept the provisions of 
Chapter 489 of the Acts of 1956 "An Act Authorizing Pay-Roll Deductions 
on Account of Contributions to Community Chests or United Funds in the 
case of certain Town Employees". 

Article 22. To determine whether the Town will vote to accept 
Chapter 223 of the Acts of 1957 of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
(Section 8 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws) establishing a Conserva- 
tion Commission, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town accept the provisions of Chapter 223 
of the Acts of 1957 of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (Section 8 of 
Chapter 40 of the General Laws) establishing a Conservation Commission. 

Article 23. To determine whether the Town will appropriate 
$70,000.00 or some other sum to construct an addition to the Public 
Library, authorize the borrowing of part or all of the amount so ap- 
propriated, and authorize the appointment of a building committee, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: Yes, 256; No, 121. That the sum of $70,000.00 be 
raised and appropriated for the purpose of constructing, equipping 
and furnishing an addition to the public library and of rewiring and 
relocating stacks in the existing public library; that to meet said 
appropriation for the purpose of rewiring and relocating stacks in the 
existing public library $5,000.00 be taken from free cash; that to 
meet said appropriation for the purpose of constructing, equipping and 
furnishing said addition $5,000.00 be taken from free cash, and 
$60,000.00 be raised by borrowing; that the Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow said 
sum of $60,000.00 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor 
under the authority of and in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws; that the Building Committee appointed 
by the Moderator pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 14 
at the Annual Meeting on March 19, 1956, be and hereby is continued 
and be and hereby is authorized and empowered to enter into contracts 
and to do or cause to be done all things necessary or desirable to 
construct, equip, and furnish said addition, and to rewire and relo- 



26 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

cate stacks in the existing public library, and that the Moderator be 
and hereby is authorized to fill any vacancy which may occur on said 
Committee. 

Article 24. To determine whether the Town will authorize the 
Water Commissioners to purchase a new service truck for the Water De- 
partment, appropriate money therefor, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: That the Town authorize the Water Commissioners to 
purchase a new service truck for the water department to replace one 
of the present trucks which will be turned in, and that the sum of 
$2,800.00 be appropriated therefor, said sum to be taken from the 
Water Works Treasury. 

Article 25. To determine whether the Town will authorize the 
Water Commissioners to purchase a new portable air compressor with 
complete equipment, appropriate money therefor, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town authorize the Water Commissioners to 
purchase for the water department a new portable air compressor with 
complete equipment, and that the sum of $2,650.00 be appropriated 
therefor, said sum to be taken from the Water Works Treasury. 

Article 26. To determine whether the Town will authorize the 
Water Commissioners to replace with new 8" pipe certain old sub- 
standard water mains in Concord Road, near the Wayland line, Old 
Sudbury Road, and South Great Road, from the intersection of Codman 
Road to the Weston line, appropriate money therefor, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town authorize the Water Commissioners to 
replace with new 8" pipe the old sub-standard water mains in the 
following roads: In Concord Road (Route 126) beginning at the end of 
the present 8" main south of Farrar Road to the Wayland Town line; 
in Old Sudbury Road beginning at the intersection of Lincoln Road and 
continuing easterly to the Boston & Maine R.R. tracks, then turning 
northerly to join South Great Road; in South Great Road from the 
intersection of Codman Road southeasterly under the Boston & Maine 
R.R. tracks to the Weston Town line; and that the sum of $75,000.00 
be appropriated therefor, and that of the amount appropriated the sum 
of $20,000.00 be taken from the Water Works Treasury, and that for 
the balance of the appropriation necessary to complete the project 
the Treasurer be and he hereby is authorized to borrow, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, a sum not to exceed $55,000.00. 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 23, 1958 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting, the polls were declared open by the Moderator at 12 o'clock 



27 



ELECTIONS 



Noon. Previously the ballot box had been inspected and the follow- 
ing Ballot Clerks duly sworn: Sadie J. Sherman, Margaret M. Algeo, 
Catherine M. Coan, Manley B. Boyce, William 0. Causer and D. Everett 
Sherman, Jr. The polls were declared closed at 7 o'clock P. M. 
with the following results. Total number of votes cast was 1008. 

Town Clerk (1 year) 
Selectman (3 years) 

Assessor (3 years) 

Treasurer (1 year) 
Auditor (1 year) 



School Committee 
(3 years) 



Regional District 
School Committee 
(3 years) 

Regional District 
School Committee 
(2 years) 

Regional District 
School Committee 
(1 year) 

Water Commissioners 
(3 years) 



Board of Health 
(3 years) 



William H. Davis 
Blanks 


954 
54 


Warren F. Flint 
George G. Tarbell, Jr. 
Blanks 


703 

293 

12 


Frederick H. Greene, Jr. 

Scattering 

Blanks 


901 

1 

106 


Frederick B. Taylor 
Blanks 


911 
97 


Louis C. Farley, Jr. 
Blanks 


898 

110 


Ernest P. Neumann 
Perry J. Culver 
Blanks 


440 

548 

20 


Victor A. Lutnicki 

Scattering 

Blanks 


888 

1 

119 


Ellen DeN. Cannon 
Blanks 


894 
114 


Kenneth W. Bergen 
Blanks 


902 
106 


Henry Warner 
Russell P. Mahan 
Scattering 
Blanks 


470 

520 

2 

16 


Gordon A. Donaldson 

Scattering 

Blanks 


911 

1 

96 



28 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Board of Health 
(2 years) 


Lucy E. By grave 
Blanks 


892 
106 


Tree Warden (1 year) 


Albert S. Brooks 

Scattering 

Blanks 


926 

1 

81 


Cemetery Commissioners 
(3 years) 


H. Arnold MacLean 
Blanks 


906 

102 


Planning Board (5 years) 


Paul Brooks 
Robert E. White 
Blanks 


605 

356 

47 


Commissioners of 
Trust Funds (3 years) 


Clement C. Sawtell 
Blanks 


887 
121 


Trustee of Bemis Fund 
(3 years) 


Christopher W. Hurd 

Scattering 

Blanks 


883 

1 
124 


Director, DeCordova 
Museum (4 years) 


Elizabeth J. Snelling 
Blanks 


925 
83 


Director, DeCordova 
Museum (1 year) 


Paul W. Cook, Jr. 

Scattering 

Blanks 


903 

1 

104 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
April 10, 1958 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator at 7:30 P. M. The return of the Warrant was 
read and an invocation to the Deity was given by Reverend Francis J. 
McLaughlin. The following business was transacted: 

Mr. Fitts asked permission of the meeting to present a matter of 
interest and spoke as follows: "We would indeed be ungrateful if 
we did not take cognizance of the following, who have just retired 
from faithful service to the Town: William T. King, Selectman, 3 
years; Ernest P. Neumann, School Committee, 6 years; Everett A. Black 
Planning Board, 5 years; Henry Warner, Water Commissioner, 8 years." 
Loud and prolonged applause greeted the announcement. 

Article 1. To see if the Town will rescind the vote passed 
under Article 23 at the Annual Town Meeting held March 17, 1958, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 



29 



TOWN MEETINGS 

After a great deal of discussion a motion duly seconded "That the 
Town rescind the vote passed under Article 23 at the Annual Town Meet- 
ing held March 17, 1958" was lost. Yes, 172; No, 349. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will provide for a committee to 
study the need for and to make recommendations with respect to 
library facilities and library personnel in the Town, both in relation 
to the schools and otherwise, raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000, 
or any other sum, therefor, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to request the 
Trustees under the will of Julian de Cordova to pay over to the 
De Cordova and Dana Museum and Park corporation 100% of the B Trust 
net income for the year 1958, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town request the Trustees under the will 
of Julian de Cordova to pay over to the De Cordova and Dana Museum 
and Park corporation 100% of the B Trust net income for the year 1958. 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:50 P. M. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
May 26, 1958 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was called to order 
by the Moderator at 7:30 P. M. The return of the Warrant was read 
and the following business was transacted: 

In the absence of the Town Clerk, William H. Davis, Mrs. M. 
Elizabeth Causer was elected temporary Clerk. 

Article 1. To determine whether the Town will vote to authorize 
the School Committee and the Board of Selectmen to make the facilities 
of the South School and one room at the Center School available to the 
Town of Sudbury for school purposes during the school year 1958-1959. 

Voted: That the Town authorize the School Committee and 
the Board of Selectmen to make the facilities of the South School and 
one room at the Center School available to the Town of Sudbury for 
school purposes for the school year 1958-1959. 

Article 2. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate $6,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of making 
external repairs to the roof and walls of the Center School or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$6,900.00 for the purpose of making external repairs to the roof and 
walls of the Center School. 



30 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Article 3. To determine whether the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate $5,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of grading, 
paving and landscaping the grounds of the Fire and Police Building, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000.00) 
be raised and appropriated to grade, pave and landscape the grounds of 
the Lincoln Fire and Police Station and that the Fire and Police 
Station Building Committee, heretofore appointed, be authorized and 
empowered to enter into contracts and do or cause to be done all 
things necessary or desirable to grade, pave, and landscape said 
grounds. 

STATE PRIMARY 
September 9, 1958 

In accordance with a Warrant duly served the polls were declared 
open at 12 o'clock Noon by Mr. Warren F. Flint. Previously the bal- 
lot box had been inspected, and the following Ballot Clerks duly 
sworn: Margaret M. Algeo, Katherine M. Coan, Elizabeth J. Snelling, 
Sadie J. Sherman, Manley B. Boyce and William 0. Causer. At 3 
o'clock P. M. Mr. Charles K. Fitts assumed the duties of Warden, and 
at 5 o'clock P. M. Mr. Elliott V. Grabill took over the duties of 
Warden and declared the polls closed at 7 o'clock P. M. The total 
number of votes cast was 424; Republicans 367, Democratic 57. 

REPUBLICAN 



Senator to Congress 
Governor 

Lieutenant Governor 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Auditor 

Attorney General 



Vincent J. Celeste 


295 


Blanks 


72 


Charles S. Gibbons 


321 


John A. Volpe 


3 


Blanks 


43 


Elmer C. Nelson 


338 


Blanks 


29 


Marion Curran Boch 


334 


Blanks 


33 


John E. Yerxa 


336 


Blanks 


31 


Thomas H. Adams 


337 


Blanks 


30 


Christian A. Herter, Jr. 


349 


Blanks 


18 



31 



Congressman, 5th District 



Councillor. 3rd District 



Senator, 5th Middlesex 



Representative in General 
Court, 10th Middlesex 

District Attorney, 
Northern District 



Clerk of Courts, 
Middlesex County 

Register of Deeds, 
Middlesex Southern District 



County Commissioner, 
Middlesex County 



Register of Probate, 
Middlesex County 
(Vacancy) 



Senator in Congress 
Governor 

Lieutenant Governor 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



ELECTIONS 




Edith Nourse Rogers 
Blanks 


308 
18 


Rudolph F. King 
Harris A. Reynolds 
Blanks 


127 

225 

15 


William E. Hays 
Blanks 


337 
15 


James DeNormandie 
Blanks 


340 

27 


William G. Andrew 
James F. Mahan 
Blanks 


173 

168 

26 


Charles T. Hughes 
Blanks 


328 
39 


William B. Bailey 
George L. Leavitt, Jr. 
Blanks 


282 
35 
50 


John F. Cahill 
Frederick Lowe 
Jesse A. Rogers 
Blanks 


172 
46 
71 
78 


Winston W. Ball 
Warren J. Fitzgerald 
Blanks 


100 

211 

56 


DEMOCRATIC 




John F. Kennedy 
Blanks 


47 
10 


Foster Furcolo 
Blanks 


45 
12 


Robert F. Murphy 
Blanks 


39 
18 


Edward J. Cronin 
Blanks 


39 
18 


William G. Shaughnessy 
John F. Kennedy 
Blanks 


34 
10 
13 



32 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Auditor 



Attorney General 



Congressman, 5th District 



Councillor, 3rd District 



Senator, 5th District 



Representative in General 
Court, 10th Middlesex 

District Attorney, 
Northern District 



Clerk of Courts, 
Middlesex County 



Register of Deeds, 
Middlesex Southern District 



Thomas J. Buckley 
Blanks 


39 
18 


Edward J. McCormack, Jr. 
Endicott Peabody 
Blanks 


10 

45 

2 


William H. Sullivan 
Blanks 


33 
24 


Joseph G. Bradley 
Kenneth J. Brophy 
Edward J. Cronin 
Frederick M. Donovan 
Blanks 


9 
3 

10 
5 

30 


Charles F. Harrington 
Blanks 


33 
24 


Richard A. White 
Blanks 


30 
27 


James L. O'Dea, Jr. 
Andrew T. Trodden 
Blanks 


47 
7 
3 


Thomas F. August 
Edward T. Brady 
T. Edward Corbett 
William T. Desmond 
Philip P. Dever 
John J. Fitzpatrick 
Angus M. MacNeill 
Harold W. McKelvey 
Edward J. Sullivan 
Blanks 


1 
3 
4 
5 
3 
3 
1 
2 
8 
27 


Edmund C. Buckley 
Henry F. Buckley 


9 
2 



Thomas F. Burns 
Joseph J. Corcoran 
James A. Cullen 
Joseph G. Dever 
Francis J. Driscoll 
John F. Ferrick 
Paul M. Haley 
Joseph T. Kelleher 
Timothy V. O'Connor 
Charles M. Sullivan 
Bernard J. Travers 
Blanks 

33 



12 





1 
20 



ELECTIONS 



County Commissioner 
Middlesex County 



Register of Probate, 
Middlesex County 
(Vacancy) 



Thomas J. Brennan 


19 


John D. Buckley 


3 


Lawrence I. Buckley 


2 


John Joseph Burke 


1 


Edmund R. Campbell 





Gilbert E. Cardoso 





Raymond E. Ennis 





Arthur G. Gendreau 





Lawrence P. Masterson 


5 


John Sarcia 


1 


John L. Sullivan 


1 


Armand R. Valentino 


2 


David I. Walsh 


4 


Blanks 


19 


John V. Harvey 


26 


Lawrence H. Avery 





George H. Bailey 





Vincent J. Bowen 





C. Michael Bradley 





Patrick J. Brennan 


2 


John Fred Buckley 


3 


John B. Carr 


1 


Timothy J. Cosgrove 


2 


Edward J. Crane 


1 


Timothy F. O'Connor 





Francis J. O'Dea 





John L. Sullivan 


4 


Blanks 


18 



STATE ELECTION 
November 4, 1958 

In accordance with a Warrant duly served the polls were declared 
open at 7 o'clock A. M. by Mr. Elliott V. Grabill. The duties of 
Warden were taken as follows: Mr. Elliott V. Grabill served from 
7 A. M. until 11 A. M. , Mr. Warren F. Flint from 11 A. M. until 3 P.M. 
and Mr. Charles K. Fitts from 3 P. M. until 7 P. M. , at which time 
Mr. Elliott V. Grabill took up the duties and declared the polls 
closed at 7:30 P. M. The following ballot clerks were duly sworn: 
Margaret M. Algeo, Elizabeth J. Snelling, William 0. Causer, Catherine 
M. Coan, D. Everett Sherman, Jr., Manley B. Boyce, Elin E. Lennon, 
Sadie Sherman, Rosina DuP. Anderson and Winifred J. Conlin. The 
ballot box had been previously inspected. Total number of votes 
cast was 1640, with the following results: 



34 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Senator in Congress 

John F. Kennedy, Democratic 868 

Vincent J. Celeste, Republican 714 

Lawrence Gilfedder, Socialist-Labor 6 

Mark R. Shaw, Prohibition 3 

Blanks 49 

Governor 

Foster Furcolo, Democratic 330 

Charles Gibbons, Republican 1268 

Henning A. Blomen, Socialist-Labor 8 

Gus S. Williams, Prohibition 2 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 31 

Lieutenant Governor 

Robert F e Murphy, Democratic 386 

Elmer C. Nelson, Republican 1210 

Francis A. Votano, Socialist-Labor 3 

Harold E. Bassett, Prohibition 4 

Blanks 37 

Secretary 

Edward J. Cronin, Democratic 425 

Marion Curran Boch, Republican 1163 

Fred M. Ingersoll, Socialist-Labor 6 

Julia B. Kohler, Prohibition 4 

Blanks 42 

Treasurer 

John F. Kennedy, Democratic 345 

John E. Yerxa, Republican 1243 

Warren C. Carsberg, Prohibition 4 

John Erlandson, Socialist-Labor 5 

Blanks 43 

Auditor 

Thomas J. Buckley, Democratic 425 

Thomas H. Adams, Republican 1176 

John B. Lauder, Prohibition 1 

Arne A. Sortell, Socialist-Labor 3 

Blanks 35 



35 



ELECTIONS 



Attorney General 

Christian A. Herter, Jr., Republican 1330 

Edward J. McCormack, Jr., Democratic 282 

Charles A. Couper, Socialist-Labor 3 

Gustave B. Nissen, Prohibition 5 

Blanks 20 

Congressman, 5th District 

Edith Nourse Rogers, Republican 1234 

William H. Sullivan, Democratic 339 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 66 

Councillor. 3rd District 

Edward J. Cronin, Democratic 352 

Rudolph F. King, Republican 1230 

Blanks 58 

Senator. 5th Middlesex 

William E. Hays, Republican 1323 

Charles F. Harrington, Democratic 262 

Blanks 55 

Representative in General Court. 10th Middlesex District 

James DeNormandie, Republican 1389 

Richard A. White, Democratic 220 

Blanks 31 

District Attorney. Northern District 

James L. O'Dea, Jr., Democratic 396 

William G. Andrew, Republican 1189 

Blanks 55 

Clerk of Courts, Middlesex County 

Charles T. Hughes, Republican 1312 

Edward J. Sullivan, Democratic 262 

Blanks 66 

Register of Deeds. Middlesex Southern Distric t 

William B. Bailey, Republican 1297 

Edmund C. Buckley, Democratic 274 

Blanks 69 

36 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



County Commissioner. Middlesex County 

Thomas J. Brennan, Democratic 345 

John F. Cahill, Republican 1227 

Blanks 68 

Register of Probate. Middlesex County (To fill vacancy) 

Warren J. Fitzgerald, Republican 1249 

•John V. Harvey, Democratic 310 

Blanks 81 

Question No. 1 

Retirement Pensions for Disability 

Yes 1160 

No 283 

Blanks 197 

Question No. 2 
Alcoholic Beverages, etc. 



Yes 260 

No 1253 

Blanks 127 



Yes 267 

No 1186 

Blanks 187 



Yes 387 

No 1107 

Blanks 146 

Question No. 3 

A. Pari-mutuel horses 

Yes 369 

No 1158 

Blanks 163 

B. Pari-mutuel dogs 

Yes 307 

No 1174 

Blanks 159 

Question No. 4 

Sweepstakes Drawing 

Yes 561 

No 949 

Blanks 3 _ 130 



LICENSES 



LICENSES 



Total number of dog licenses issued during the year 1958, 576, 
namely: 310 males, 86 females, 178 spayed females and 2 kennels, 
for which the sum of $1,288.50 has been paid to the Treasurer. 

Sporting, etc., issued during the year 1958: Fishing, 90; 
Hunting, 43; Sporting, 26; Minor Fishing, 11; Female Fishing, 13; 
Non-resident Special, 1; Duplicate 2; and Alien Fishing, 2; for which 
the sum of $582.50 has been paid to the Division of Fisheries & Game. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



38 



Finance 



STATE AND TOWN AUDITORS 

Louis C. Farley, Jr., Town Auditor 

The work of the State Auditor in 1958 consisted, as usual, of a 
thorough check of the Town's financial records for the preceding year, 
1957, and the preparation of a statement of the Town's financial con- 
dition at the beginning of the year 1958. 

The statutes provide that the "substance" of the State Auditor's 
report be published. In the Town Auditor's opinion, this substance 
is contained in the balance sheet of the Town prepared by the State 
Auditor, showing the condition of the Town as of December 31, 1957. 
A summarization of this Balance Sheet is published below. 

The full Auditor's report is on file with the Town Clerk, and 
is available for the examination of any interested citizens of the 
Town. 



39 



FINANCE 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1957 

GENERAL ACCOUNTS 

ASSETS 

Cash: 

General $563,592.34 

Water 42.204.21 







$605,796.55 


Accounts Receivable: 






Taxes: 






Levy of 1956: 






Personal Property 


163.00 




Real Estate 


1,015.50 




Levy of 1957: 






Poll 


2.00 




Personal Property 


122.40 




Real Estate 


7.461.60 


8,764.50 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise: 






Levy of 1956 


523.66 




Levy of 1957 


9.210.35 


9,734.01 


Farm Animal Excise: 






Levy of 1957 




23.75 


Water: 






Rates, 1956 


49.60 




Rates, 1957 


1,928.36 




Miscellaneous Charges 


173.91 


2,151.87 


Aid to Highways: 






State 


1,500.00 




County 


4.750.00 


6,250.00 


Loans Authorized: 






School Construction 




50,000.00 


Underestimates 1957: 






State Recreation Areas 


54.12 




County Tax 


1.400.87 





1,454.99 



$684,175.67 



40 



AUDITOR 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

ceeds of Dog Licenses, Due County 

Tailings - Unclaimed Checks 

Trust Fund Income: 

John H. Pierce Hospital and Park Fund $ 
Julian DeCordova School Equipment Fund 
Grammar School Fund 



181.00 

711.84 

42.85 



Loans Authorized and Unissued 

Overestimate 1957: 

County Hospital Assessment 

Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 



$ 31.75 
440.20 







935.69 


Premium on Loans: 






Police and Fire Station Loan 


366.13 




School Loan 


77.08 


443.21 


Accrued Interest on Loans: 






Police and Fire Station Loan 


285.00 




School Loan 


60.00 


345.00 


Old Age Assistance Recoveries 




3,724.84 


Federal Grants: 






Disability Assistance: 






Administration 


40.12 




Assistance 


236.92 




Aid to Dependent Children: 






Administration 


46.99 




Aid 


384.88 




Old Age Assistance: 






Administration 


145.80 




Assistance 


1,779.49 




School (Public Law 874) 


6.662.04 


9,296.24 


School Milk Fund 




535.07 


Appropriation Balances: 






Revenue: 






General 


11,894.40 




Non-Revenue (Loan Balances): 






Police and Fire Station Construction 


52,978.93 




School Construction 


374,266.06 




Water Mains 


1.401.92 





440,541.31 
50,000.00 

906.73 
15,733.44 



41 



FINANCE 



Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 

Levy of 1956 $ 1,178.50 

Lew of 1Q57 2,012.71 



Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 9,734.01 

Farm Animal Excise 23.75 

Water 2,151.87 

Aid to Highway 6,250.00 



Surplus Revenue: 

General 99,089.06 

Water 40,802.29 



3,191.21 



18,159.63 

139.891.35 
$684,175.67 



42 



TREASURER 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1958 



General Water Total 

Cash on hand and deposit 

January 1, 1958 $ 563,592.34 $ 42,204.21 $ 605,796.55 
Receipts 1958 

(See Accounting Officer's 

report for detail) 1.025.764.29 92.157.09 1,117,921.38 

$1,589,356.63 $134,361.30 $1,723,717.93 

Payments per warrants 1958 $1,406,655.75 $103,673.19 $1,510,328.94 

Cash balance Dec. 31, 1958 182,700.88 30,688.11 213,388.99 

$1,589,356.63 $134,361.30 $1,723,717.93 



Cash on hand December 31,1958: 

Harvard Trust Co., Concord $ 38,646.04 $ 30,688.11 $ 69,334.15 

First National Bank, Boston 708.82 - 708.82 
Merchants National Bank, 

Boston 39,377.65 - 39,377.65 

Belmont Savings Bank 4,993.52 - 4,993.52 

Beverly Savings Bank 5,322.82 - 5,322.82 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bk. 4,945.53 - 4,945.53 

Brockton Savings Bank 5,470.04 . - 5,470.04 

Brookline Savings Bank 2,748.80 - 2,748.80 

Cambridge Savings Bank 5,910.65 - 5,910.65 

Charlestown Savings Bank 6,130.87 - 6,130.87 

Home Savings Bank 5,579.82 - 5,579.82 

Inst, for Savings, Roxbury 5,497.34 - 5,497.34 

Lowell Inst, for Savings 2,648.49 - 2,648.49 

Lynn Five Cents Savings Bank 5,520.01 - 5,520.01 

Maiden Savings Bank 2,730.32 - 2,730.32 

Natick Five Cents Savings Bk. 3,686.53 - 3,686.53 

Newton Savings Bank 5,566.24 - 5,566.24 

North Avenue Savings Bank 2,858.35 - 2,858.35 

Provident Inst, for Savings 5,596.43 - 5,596.43 

Suffolk-Franklin Savings Bank 5,642.93 - 5,642.93 

Waltham Savings Bank 3,362.64 - 3,362.64 

Warren Inst, for Savings 8,042.77 - 8,042.77 

Whitman Savings Bank 5,714.27 - 5,714.27 

Concord Co-operative Bank 6 , 000 . 00 - 6,000.0 

$ 182,700.88 $ 30,688.11 $ 213,388.99 



Frederick B. Taylor 
Town Treasurer 



43 



FINANCE 

CEMETERY INVESTMENT FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1958 
Proceeds of sale of cemetery lots 
Savings bank interest 



Deposited in savings bank 
Savings bank interest allowed to 
accumulate 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 



$389.99 
392.20 



$ 1.99 
388.00 
392.20 

$ 782.19 



782.19 



$12.833.87 



Frederick B. Taylor, Town Treasurer 



44 





TREASURER 








CEMETERY PERPETUAL 


CARE FUNDS 










Income 










Accumu- 










lated 




December 


Funds deposited in Middlesex 




before 


1958 


31, 1958 


Institution for Savings 


Principal 
$ 300.00 


1958 


Income 
$ 11.64 


Balance 


Samuel Hartwell 


$ 55.42 


$ 367.06 


Orila J. Flint 


300.00 


45.94 


11.31 


357.25 


Annie A. Ray 


300.00 


126.07 


13.94 


440.01 


Maria L. Thompson 


500.00 


176.05 


22.15 


698.20 


John H. Pierce 


500.00 


68.40 


18.61 


587.01 


George F. Harrington 


100.00 


21.63 


3.97 


125.60 


Francis Flint 


250.00 


124.24 


12.26 


386.50 


Wm. W. Benjamin 


500.00 


232.10 


23.99 


756.09 


Abijah Jones 


300.00 


39.57 


11.12 


350.69 


Ellen F. Whitney 


100.00 


19.97 


3.90 


123.87 


E. H. Rogers 


250.00 


36.15 


9.36 


295.51 


Ellen T. Trask 


200.00 


97.04 


9.72 


306.76 


Thos. Huddleston 


200.00 


28.48 


7.48 


235.96 


Joa Pacewicz 


400.00 


39.02 


14.38 


453.40 


Mary Susan Rice 


87.27 


28.41 


3.77 


119.45 


Julia A. Bemis 


300.00 


25.36 


10.64 


336.00 


Donald Gordon 


300.00 


172.76 


15.47 


488.23 


Elizabeth G. Chapin 


300.00 


110.66 


13.44 


424.10 


Sarah J. Browning 


200.00 


15.23 


7.03 


222.26 


Agnes L. Brown 


300.00 


60.07 


11.78 


371.85 


Lewis W. Woodworth 


150.00 


26.80 


5.77 


182.57 


Robert B. Chapin 


300.00 


46.82 


11.34 


358.16 


Gardner Moore 


300.00 


42.95 


11.22 


354.17 


Mary James Scripture 


500.00 


77.52 


18.90 


596.42 


Chas. P. Farnsworth 


350.00 


26.23 


12.32 


388.55 


Helen 0. Storrow 


2,000.00 


388.34 


78.25 


2,466.59 


Elizabeth S. Wheeler 


200.00 


38.00 


7.79 


245.79 


L. B. & A. E. Thiessen 


500.00 


109.75 


19.96 


629.71 


Paul Dorian 


150.00 


30.25 


5.90 


186.15 


Raymond E. Hagerty 


150.00 


30.25 


5.90 


186.15 


Charles 0. Preble 


100.00 


18.16 


3.87 


122.03 


George G. Tarbell 


400.00 


34.34 


14.22 


448.56 


Eugene Sherman 


200.00 


17.57 


7.12 


224.69 


Mildred E. Bowles 


200.00 


14.23 


7.01 


221.24 


Mabel H. Todd 


200.00 


11.99 


6.92 


218.91 


John J. Kelliher 


200.00 


10.44 


6.87 


217.31 


Lena M. Newell 


325.00 


- 


8.85 


333.85 


Mary H. Cushing 


100.00 


- 


- 


100.00 


William H. Costello 


100.00 


- 


- 


100.00 


Marie H. Bisbee 


200.00 


- 


- 


200.00 


Funds deposited in Suffolk 










Savings Bank 










J. Waldo Smith 


300.00 


50.20 


11.46 


361.66 


Charles S. Smith 


300.00 


53.46 


11.57 


365.03 


Edward R. Farrar 


300.00 


35.11 


10.97 


346.08 


Anne D. Pollard 


300.00 


35.30 


10.97 


346.27 




$13,512.27 


$2,620.28 


$5l3 f 14 


$16,645.69 




45 









FINANCE 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 



100,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $10,000 each December 1, 
1959 - 1968, issued under Chapter 208, Acts of 1948. 

40,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 each December 1, 
1959 - 1968, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws, as 
amended. 

159,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $13,000 each December 1, 
1959 - 1961, and $12,000 each December 1, 1962 - 1971, 
issued under Chapter 356, Acts of 1951. 

52,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 each December 1, 
1959 - 1971, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as 
amended. 

95,000 Fire and Police Station Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 each 

October 1, 1959 - 1977, issued under Chapter 44, General 
Laws as amended. 

380,000 School Project Loan, 3.60%, due $20,000 each October 1, 
1959 - 1977, issued under the Acts of 1948. 

70,000 School Construction Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 each October 
1, 1959 - 1972, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 
as amended. 

40,000 Water Main Loan, 2.70%, due $5,000 each October 1, 1959 - 
1966, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as amended. 

60,000 Library Addition Loan, 2 1/2%, due $5,000 each August 1, 
1959 - 1970, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as 
amended. 

50,000 Water Mains Loan, 2 1/2%, due $5,000 each August 1, 

1959 - 1968, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as 

amended. 



$1,046,000 

Authorized but unissued - $5,000 Water Mains Loan. 



Frederick B. Taylor, Town Treasurer 



46 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 

ACCOUNTING OFFICER 

M. Elizabeth Causer 

A report of receipts and expenditures for the year ending December 31 
1958, with a balance sheet showing the financial condition of the Town. 

BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 



January 1, 1959 



Real and Personal 

Valuation 1956 less abatements 
Valuation 1957 less abatements 
Valuation 1958 less abatements 

Motor Vehicle 

Valuation 1956 less abatements 
Valuation 1957 less abatements 
Valuation 1958 less abatements 



Average Valuation $8,289,072 

5% Legal Borrowing Capacity 414,453 



$6,533,560.00 
7,141,145.00 
7,603,339.00 

1,112,122.00 

1,233,401.00 

1.243.649.00 

$24,867,216.00 



FUNDED DEBT 



General, Inside Limit 

Outside Limit 
Enterprise, Water 

TOTAL FUNDED DEBT 1/1/59 

AVAILABLE BORROWING CAPACITY 1/1/59 

AUTHORIZED BUT UNISSUED (Water) 



$ 317,000.00 

639,000.00 

90.000.00 

$ 1,046,000.00 

$ 97,453.00 

$ 5,000.00 



47 



FINANCE 



GENERAL REVENUE 



Current Year 
Polls 
Personal 
Real Estate 


$ 1,928.00 

44,725.50 

515.441.76 


Prior Years 
Polls 
Personal 
Real Estate 


2.00 

113.10 

6.431.00 


From the State 
Income Tax 
Corporation Tax 
Meals Tax 
Reimbursement loss of Taxes 


60,163.20 

21,826.00 

515.46 

680.83 


Permits 
Building 
Plumbing 
Wiring 


1,009.00 
790.00 
459.00 



Fines 
Court 

Grants and Gifts 
School Construction 
Transportation 



From Federal Grants 
Old Age Assistance 
Administration 
Assistance 

School Aid (Public Law 874) 

From County 
Dog Licenses 
Care & Killing 



26,723.41 
17.320.90 



693.79 
11.608.05 



1,001.99 
294.00 



Privileges 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Levy of 1958 

Prior years 
Farm Excise 



COMMERCIAL REVENUE 



72,514.65 

15,577.25 

68.79 



$562,095.26 



6,546.10 



83,185.49 

2,258.00 
45.00 

44,044.31 



12,301.84 
17,189.15 



1,295.99 



88,160.70 



48 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



Legal settlement 

Selectmen 

Sale of By-Laws, maps, etc, 
Treasurer 

Unidentified receipts 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

$ 954.00 

84.99 
.51 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Board of Appeals 
Planning Board 
Police 

Pistol permits 
Fire Department 

Pumping cellars 

Insurance collection 



37.00 
85.00 
41.00 

54.00 

227.25 
230.50 



$ 1,039.50 



674.75 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Health 

Dog Innoculations 
Nurses' fees 
Garbage collections 
Licenses 



Ch. 90 Construction 

County Aid 
Ch. 90 Maintenance 

State Aid 

County Aid 



Snow Removal, State 
Cemetery, Supt. Salary 
Insurance collection 



Old Age Assistance 
State reimbursement 
Cities and towns 
Refunds 

Refunds A. D. C. 



HIGHWAYS 



89.50 

205.50 

5,317.75 

19.50 



3,250.00 

1,497.98 
1.497.98 



440.25 

150.00 

40.00 



PUBLIC WELFARE 



13,758.75 
497.10 
123.10 
364.00 



5,632.25 



6,245.96 



630.25 



14.742.95 



49 



FINANCE 



VETERANS 



Paraplegic Veterans, State $ 307.50 

Refund 66.14 



SCHOOL AND LIBRARY 

Tuition 282.80 

State Wards, State 419.57 

Vocational Education, State 798.62 

Sale of books & rent of gym 451.46 

Milk Fund 5,156.58 

Library fines 814.34 



UNCLASSIFIED 

DeCordova reimbursement for 

State Audit 150.00 

Insurance dividends 744.87 

Water Department, reimbursement 585.46 



RECREATION 

Swimming program 528.05 
Miscellaneous receipts 45.68 



CEMETERIES 

Interments 450.00 

Foundations 28.00 



INTEREST 

Interest on Taxes 270.70 

U. S. Government Bonds 2,505.04 

Interest on Savings Accounts 3.162.01 



AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

Agency 

Dog Licenses 1,402.75 

Grammar School Fund 39.72 

DeCordova School Equipment Fund 736.51 



REFUNDS 

General Departments 449.99 

Cash advances returned 65.00 



50 



$ 373.64 



7,923.37 



1,480.33 



573.73 



478.00 



5,937.75 



2,178.98 



514.99 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



LOANS 



Temporary Loans $100,000.00 

Premium on Loans 216.00 

Library Loan 60.000.00 



Bonds 50,000.00 

Bond Premium 180.00 



$160,216.00 



Total Cash Receipts $1,025,764.29 

Cash Balance January 1, 1958 563.592.34 

$1,589,356.63 



WATER REVENUE 

Water Rates $ 36,660.35 

Water Connections 1,753.50 

Hydrant Rentals 3,495.00 

Miscellaneous Receipts 68.24 



41.977.09 



50.180.00 



Total Water Department Receipts $ 92,157.09 

Cash Balance January 1, 1958 42.204.21 

$ 134,361.30 



EXPENDITURES 
PAYMENTS ON SELECTMEN'S WARRANTS 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen $ 1,149.99 

Finance Committee 15.00 

Town Office 5,245.24 

Accounting Officer & Ex. 3,562.93 

Treasurer 941.35 

Collector 2,497.50 

Assessors 2,301.73 

Legal 1,880.49 

Town Clerk 497.32 

Elections and Registration 1,038.80 

Planning and Zoning 2,786.47 

Town Hall 5,408.82 

Consulting and Engineering 1.945.57 

$ 29,271.21 



51 



FINANCE 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS. AND PROPERTY 

Police $ 27,592.96 

Police Cruiser 1,076.44 

Fire Department 16,109.80 

Fire and Police Building 6,414.24 

Land for Fire and Police Building 6,050.00 
Construction of Fire and Police 

Building 52,911.68 
Paving & Landscaping Fire and Police 

Building 4,390.06 

Communications 11,723.12 

Tree Warden 3,199.63 

Moth Department 4,484.43 

Civil Defense 566.71 

Inspectors of Buildings 1,057.50 

Printing Building Code 134.42 

Board of Appeals 227.89 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Board of Health 4,185.64 

Sanitation 4,100.97 

Pest Control 6,000.00 

Inspector of Animals 100.00 



HIGHWAYS 

Highways 57,591.30 

Highway Building 1,413.48 

Chapter 90 18,470.54 

Poison Ivy Control 796.09 



CHARITIES 

Aid to Citizens 28,651.16 

Administration 1,508.94 

Veterans' Aid 732.06 



EDUCATION 

Elementary School 293,215.00 

Regional High School 115,739.77 

Elementary School Construction 367,409.42 

Land Purchase 3,500.00 

Repairs to roof 6.335.00 



LIBRARY 

Library 9,375.09 

Library Building 969.29 

Library Building Committee 1,336.50 

Library Addition 44.720.10 

52 



$135,938.88 



14,386.61 



78,271.41 



30,892.16 



786.199.19 



56.400.98 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



RECREATION 



Playground $ 2,578.48 

Parks 1,209.25 

Tennis Courts 12,364.90 

Swimming Program 533.70 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Middlesex County Pension Fund 3,345.20 

Employee Insurance & Hospitalization 3,676.44 

Property Insurance 11,580.03 

Dump Rent & Maintenance 2,615.37 

Town Reports 1,317.58 

July 4th 967.90 

Memorial Day 175.00 

Capital Requirements Committee 196.05 



Bond Payment 66,000.00 

Interest on Bonds & Tax Notes 27.610.00 



$ 16,686.33 



23,873.57 



CEMETERIES 
Cemeteries 4,092.74 

TOWN DEBT SERVICE 



93.610.00 



REFUNDS 

Refunds on Taxes 5,495.80 

AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

Dog Licenses due County 1,414.50 

Milk Fund 5,289.45 

Repayment of Temporary Loan 100,000.00 

State Parks & Reservations 1,942.84 

Tax for State Audit 2,697.28 

County Tax 17,028.46 

County Hospital Assessment 2,859.45 

Premium on Library Loan 123.89 

John H. Pierce Hospital & Park 181.00 

131.536.87 

Total Expenditures $1,406,655.75 

Cash Balance December 31, 1958 182.700.88 

$1,589,356.63 



53 



FINANCE 



WATER 



Operating $ 27,458.49 

Mains, South Great Road 65,224.20 

Bonds and interest 6,237.50 

Service truck 2,190.30 

Air Compressor 2,401.00 

Refunds 58.44 

Bond premium 103.26 

$103,673.19 

Cash Balance December 31, 1958 30,688.11 

$134,361.30 



54 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



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64 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



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FINANCE 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 
Balance Sheet, December 31, 1958 
General Accounts 
ASSETS 



Cash 



General 
Water 



Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes 

Levy of 1957 

Personal 

Real 

Levy of 1958 

Poll 

Personal 

Real 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 
Levy of 1957 
Levy of 1958 

Farm Animal Excise 
Levy of 1957 
Levy of 1958 

Departmental Receipts, Assessors 

Water 

Rates of 1957 
Rates of 1958 
Miscellaneous 

Aid to Highways 
State 
County 

Loan Authorized, Water 

Underestimates 1958 
County Tax 

Overlay Deficit, Levy of 1958 



$182,700.88 
30.688.11 



$213,388.99 



119.00 
1,928.40 


2,047.40 


16.00 

232.50 

11,763.11 


12,011.61 


674.91 
4,820.98 


5,495.89 


23.75 
82.18 


105.93 




1,217.32 


142.26 

2,323.40 

111.46 


2,577.12 


8,500.00 
5,000.00 


13,500.00 




5,000.00 




35.07 




179.41 




$255,558.74 



66 



ACCOUNTING OFFICER 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



Proceeds of Dog Licenses, due County 

Tailings, unclaimed checks 

Trust Fund Income: 

Julian deCordova School Equipment 
Grammar School Fund 

Premium on Loans 
Library Loan 
Water Main Loan 
School and Police & Fire Station 

Accrued Interest on Loans 

Police and Fire Station Loan 

Old Age Assistance Recoveries 
A. D. C. Recovery 

Federal Grants: 

Disability Assistance 
Disability Administration 
A.D.C. Assistance 
A.D.C. Administration 
0. A. A. Assistance 
0. A. A. Administration 

School (Public Law 874) 

School Milk Fund 





$ 20.00 




440.20 


736.51 
39.72 


776.23 


92.11 

76.74 

443.21 


612.06 




345.00 


3,476.39 
364.00 


3,840.39 


236.92 
40.12 

374.88 

46.99 

3,212.15 

10.55 


277.04 

421.87 

3,222.70 




2,813.21 




402.20 



Appropriation Balances: 






Revenue 






General 


9,863.02 




Non-Revenue (Loan Balances) 






Police & Fire Sta. Construction 


67.25 




School Construction 


6,856.64 




Water Mains 


6,177.72 




Library Construction 


25,279.90 


48,244.53 


Loan Authorized and Unissued (Water) 




5,000.00 


Overestimate of 1958: 






State Parks 


22.05 




County Hospital 


116.40 


138.45 


Reserve Fund, Overlay Surplus 




8,792.07 



Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 
Levy of 1957 



1,259.95 



67 



FINANCE 



Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

Farm Animal Excise 

Water 

Aid to Highways 

Departmental revenue 



5,495.89 

105.93 

2,577.12 

13,500.00 

1,217.32 



$ 22,896.26 



Surplus Revenue 
General 
Water 



131,622.93 
24,433.65 



156,056.58 



Funded or Fixed Debt 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



$ 255,558.74 



Serial Loans 

Inside Debt Limit 
General: 
School 
Library 
Police and Fire Building 



$162,000.00 
60,000.00 
95,000.00 $317,000.00 



Outside Debt Limit 
General : 

School 
Water: 

Mains 



639,000.00 
90,000.00 



729,000.00 



$1,046,000.00 



68 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



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69 



FINANCE 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Elmer H. Ziegler 

William M. Rand, Jr. 

Frederick H. Greene, Jr., Chairman 

The Board of Assessors submits the following report for the year 1958: 

According to law, all real estate and personal property tax abatement 
requests must be filed with the Board on or before October 1 of the year in 
question. 

All automobile excise tax abatement requests must be filed with the 
Board within six months of the date of issuance of the notice of the assess- 
ment or of the date of sale or transfer of the vehicle, but in any event not 
later than January 31 of the succeeding year. However, if the bill or 
notice is first sent after January 1 of the succeeding year, the abatement 
request must be filed on or before the thirtieth day after the date on which 
the bill or notice is sent. No abatement may reduce the excise collected 
to less than $2.00. 

1958 Recapitulation 

Total appropriations to be raised from taxation $799,090.99 

Appropriations to be taken from available funds 83,244.18 

State Tax and Assessments: 

State Parks & Reservations $ 1,964.89 

Underestimate for 1957 54.12 

State Audit 2.697.28 4,716.29 

County Tax and Assessments: 

County Tax $16,993.39 

Underestimate of County Tax for 1957 1,400.87 
T. B. Hospital Assessment 2.975.85 21,370.11 

Overlay of current year 8.699.84 

Gross Amount to be raised $ 917.121.41 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 

Income Tax $52,126.24 

Corporation Taxes 16,095.60 

Reimbursement a/c public land 680.82 

Old Age Tax (Meals) 715.28 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 71,955.62 

Old Age Assistance 11,200.00 

Schools 19,431.00 

Water Department 44,702.50 

State Assistance for School Construction 17,294.00 

Interest on Taxes & Assessments 6,729.38 

All Others 11.007.94 

$251,938.38 

1957 Overestimate, T. B. Hospital 906.73 
Appropriations voted to be taken from 

available funds 83.244.18 $336,089.29 

70 



ASSESSORS 



Net amount to be raised by taxation on 

polls and property $581.032.12 

$917.121.41 



Number of polls 1056 at $2.00 $ 2,112.00 

Total Valuation: 

Personal Property $600,690 at $75.00 45,051.75 

Real Estate $7.118.245 at $75.00 533.868.37 

$7,718,935 $581,032.12 



Number of acres of land assessed: 8030.37 

Number of dwelling houses assessed: 992 

Tax Rate per $1,000.00 $ 75.00 



71 



Protection of 
Lives and Property 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Leo J. Algeo, Chief 

I hereby submit my report for the Police Department for the year 
ending December 31, 1958. 

Arrests by Lincoln Police 57 

Arrests by State Police 37 

Warning notices issued for violations 

of motor vehicle law 116 

Violations of motor vehicle law 

reported to Registry of Motor 

Vehicles 34 

Motor vehicle accident report: 

accidents reported 156 

occupants injured 108 

occupants killed 1 

pedestrians injured 3 

Ten of the above arrests made by Lincoln police involved juven- 
iles, most of them being non-residents. 

On March 28, the department moved to its new quarters at Lincoln 
and Codman Road. We are very pleased with these quarters and want 
to thank the people of the town for providing them for us. We shall 
endeavor to show our appreciation through our service to you. I 
wish to thank Bob Booth, who, as chairman of the Building Committee, 
sacrificed much of his time and did a tremendous job of directing the 
whole building program. 

We have, in the basement of the new station, one of the finest 
target ranges in this area due to the volunteer work of members of 
the Police Department, the Fire Department, and others. There are 
too many individuals involved to name all who contributed to this 
project, but I think I would be remiss if I did not mention Al 
Crockett and Bill Dean. This range has been built and equipped at 
practically no cost to the Town of Lincoln. Sgt. Maclnnis, with the 
assistance of Patrolman McHugh, now has two teen age groups firing on 
alternate Fridays. The Police Department has two teams firing in 
the New England Police Revolver League. A group of military men in 

72 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

the area are firing every Tuesday afternoon and the range is open 
every Tuesday night for any resident of Lincoln who would like to use 
it. All these activities are carried on under the supervision of 
this department. 

In September, Mrs. Jeanette Bradley and Mrs. Elaine Courtney 
were appointed school traffic supervisors. They have been very ef- 
fective in guarding our school children at the Lincoln Road crossings 
and assisting the school bus drivers at the Center School. They have 
relieved the department of the responsibility of trying to cover these 
posts, which were not always able to do, because of other duties and 
a lack of manpower. 

The department photography work has been assigned to Patrolman 
Gordon and, thanks to the guidance of George Heck, he is developing 
and printing our pictures at the De Cordova Museum dark room. 

I have been attending a State University Extension course on 
Criminal Law at Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Monday even- 
ings. 

Chet Wood, custodian and communications operator, and the night 
operators of our communications system, have done an excellent job, 
and I want to thank them for it. 



73 



PROTECTION 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Chief 
William M. Dean, Clerk 
Frank Gordon, Engineer 

The Board organized electing Andrew J. Dougherty Chief and 
William Dean Clerk. The Department answered 147 alarms during the 
year, as listed below: 

Grass and Woods Fires 37 

House and Accessories 26 

Cars and Accidents 18 

Miscellaneous 24 

Edison Wires in Trees 23 

Stand By 11 

Aid to Concord 2 

Aid to Wayland 2 

False Alarms 5 

The Fire Department has moved into its new quarters and is very 
much pleased with our surroundings. We are hoping to have the 
North Lincoln Fire Station rebuilt, so that it will have sleeping 
accomodations, so that we may have more protection in that area in 
case of need. If any one has any dishes or silver ware they 
would like to donate to the Fire Department, they would receive a 
good home. 



74 



TREE WARDEN 



TREE WARDEN 

Albert S. Brooks 

Much of the time of the Tree Department was spent during the 
winter months in removal of dead, dying and dangerous trees along the 
streets of the town, and also removal and disposal of as many as 
possible of the elm trees infected with Dutch Elm Disease. Eighty- 
one elm samples were sent to Shade Tree Laboratories at Amherst, and 
seventy-six of them were confirmed as having Dutch Elm Disease. 
Under this program, one hundred seventy-eight elm trees were con- 
demned and most of them have been removed and disposed of. 

The Edison Company, in conjunction with the New England Telephone 
Company, has contracted with Eastern Tree and Landscape Corporation 
to trim along every telephone and electric line in the town under the 
supervision of the tree warden. Your tree warden, being dissatisfied 
with so many of the small trees under the wires being topped and left 
standing, has been able to get the Edison and Telephone Companies to 
agree to remove most of these valueless and unsightly trees at their 
own expense. It is hoped by both the Edison Company and the tree 
department that this program will improve conditions along the wires, 
so that we will not have the trouble and interruption of service we 
have had in the past at almost every storm. 

In 1959 I hope to resume our program of trimming out the dead 
and dangerous limbs as we did in 1957 and early 1958. 



75 



PROTECTION 



CIVIL DEFENSE AGENCY 

Eveleth R. Todd, Director 

Two major projects have occupied the Lincoln Civil Defense 
Agency during the past year. Project number one, with the assist- 
ance of the Federal and State Agencies, has been the preparation of 
an'Operations Plan. This plan, which is required of all municipal- 
ities, not only forms a basis for Civil Defense planning, organization 
and training, but also spells out the action to be taken by the Civil 
Defense forces and the general public at the time of impending or 
actual enemy attack. Although many of the details included in the 
plan as it pertains to Lincoln must still be worked out, it serves as 
a valuable guide and should do much toward coordinating the efforts 
of all communities throughout the Commonwealth. 

Project number two has been the conversion of the old Chevrolet 
fire truck into a light rescue truck. Already a portable generator 
and chain saw have been acquired. Other equipment such as jacks, 
rope, shovels, wrecking bars, etc. will be added as funds permit. 
We believe this vehicle, when finally manned and equipped, will prove 
useful in assisting the other protective departments of the Town. 

The Lincoln Civil Defense Agency is handicapped in its develop- 
ment, like most Agencies throughout the State, because of the lack of 
man power. Major services are communications, engineering, medical, 
radiological, supply, rescue and welfare. Anybody whose interests 
or talents lie in any of the above categories will be warmly welcomed. 

This year we are distributing with the Town report, a booklet 
entitled "Home Protection Exercises". This booklet outlines in a 
general way the preparation and the action to be taken by individuals 
and families in the event of an emergency. More detailed informa- 
tion on many of the subjects covered is available on request through 
your agency. 



76 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. Gordon Donaldson, Chairman 
Lucy E. By grave 
William Halsey 

In March, 1958, the Board of Health was organized with Dr. 
Gordon Donaldson, Chairman; Mrs. Lucy Bygrave, Secretary; Mrs. 
Marian Ober, Agent; Mr. William Davis, Burial Agent; Mr. Anthony 
Dougherty, Inspector of Animals; and Dr. Alden Russell, Inspector 
of Slaughtering. Walter Hill resigned from the Board in early 
December, and Mr. William Halsey was appointed by the Selectmen to 
fill the vacancy. 

The following licenses were issued during 1958: Overnight 
cabins, 1; Slaughtering of poultry, 1; Piggeries, 2; Sale of alco- 
hol, 6; Garbage transportation, 2. In addition routine inspections 
were made of piggeries, restaurants, cider presses, stores, over- 
night cabins, and rest homes. As required by law, the following 
communicable diseases were reported: Measles, 85; German Measles, 
42; Chicken Pox, 59; Mumps, 6; Strep, sore throat, 33; Salmonellosis, 
11; Dog Bite, 14. 

One hundred seventy-nine dogs were innoculated against rabies 
at the annual Dog Clinic held in May in the Town Barn. This clinic 
provides the additional service of dog licensing, with the Town 
Clerk in charge. It is important that every dog in town be innocu- 
lated against rabies, as well as licensed; and later in the year 
dogs not so protected at our Clinic are checked by the police. If 
the Town is to be held responsible for furnishing anti-rabic treat- 
ment in case of dog bite, the law requires that each instance be 
reported in writing by the physician, and the dog must be impounded 
for two weeks by the Inspector of Animals. 

The Well Child Conference continues to be held on the third 
Thursday of every month, under the expert supervision of Dr. John 
Davies, Mrs. Ober, and a corps of able volunteers. This clinic is 
open to all infants and pre-school children; and examinations and 
various innoculations are given for a nominal fee. Appointments 
should be made through the Town Nurse. This year 21 babies, 69 
pre-school children, and 51 kindergarten children were examined. 

The Dental Clinic at the school continues to operate under the 
direction of Dr. James Oakes, with the assistance of the Town Nurse. 

77 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



The State-required routine survey of all school children is com- 
pleted each year, and the generosity of the Pierce Fund covers the 
expense of this diagnostic part of the clinic. If dental treat- 
ment is needed, a note is sent home to the parent or guardian to 
this effect, suggesting care either at the clinic or by a private 
dentist. The Pierce Fund makes treatment possible at the clinic at 
the rate of $4 per half hour. 

Although the major drive against poliomyelitis has been com- 
pleted, we continue to urge vaccination of all townspeople under 
40 years of age. Only when all cooperate in this program will the 
dangers of polio be eliminated. The vaccine is provided free of 
charge now only to children attendant at the Well Child Clinic. 

The garbage service continues under the aegis of the Board of 
Health. There are approximately 325 subscribers, and the charge 
is $7.50 semi-annually, payable to the Town. 

This year four land subdivisions have been reviewed with the 
Planning Board and two of these have met with approval. The sani- 
tation problems associated with water drainage and sewage disposal 
of building lots and of land subdivisions became so complex three 
years ago that expert engineering services were sought. The cost 
of this town sanitary agent is defrayed in part by the building 
permit fee. In June of this year the Board's building regulations 
were further clarified by legal notice. It is now required that 
detail plans, drawn by an approved licensed sanitary engineer, 
covering both drainage and sewage disposal systems of any proposed 
building site or increased use of existing building, be presented 
to the Board of Health. This preliminary survey and plan is pro- 
vided at the individual's expense. Prior to approval of the build- 
ing permit, the Board's sanitary inspector must run satisfactory 
percolation tests in the area of the planned sewage disposal system. 

The Fluorine Committee appointed by the Board, consisting of 
Mrs. J. Barnaby, Dr. H. Hardy, Dr. W. Calkins, Mr. R. Pearmain, and 
Mr. S. Avery, Chairman, have returned their report relative to add- 
ing fluorine to the town water supply as a means of reducing dental 
cavitation. Plans are underway to promote discussion of this 
issue among the townspeople; and at a later date, in conjunction 
with the Board of Water Commissioners, to present the matter for 
public vote. 



78 



NURSING COMMITTEE 



NURSING COMMITTEE 

Lucy E. Bygrave, Chairman 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 

Louise H. McClennen, Secretary 

The Nursing Committee held five meetings with Mrs. Ober during 
1958. Mrs. Robert Bygrave was appointed chairman to fill the 
vacancy caused by the resignation of Mrs. Bradford Cannon. The 
committee has assisted Mrs. Ober with the Well-Child Conference, the 
bookkeeping of the Dental Service, the eye and ear testing programs 
and the follow-up of the school physical examination program. 

The reduction of the Smith School Health Unit, by one room, for 
school purposes received considerable thought by this committee. 
After the change was completed, the committee and Mrs. Ober con- 
sidered moving the Well-Child Conference to the more spacious rooms 
at the Hartwell School. When the situation was viewed with Dr. 
Davies, he preferred to remain in the health unit at the Smith School 
At this time, a review of clinic procedures was made and suggestions 
for increased efficiency were adopted. 

The value of the required school physical exams has been 
questioned because of incomplete returns. Methods of raising the 
standards and the encouragement of using the family physician have 
been continually recommended. 

Accurate and complete reporting of contagious diseases has been 
such that this committee has recommended that the school and the 
town health requirements be, in some form, made known to all the 
citizens. 

In anticipation of Mrs. Ober's retirement in June the committee 
has attempted to familiarize itself more with her schedule of work. 
In this connection the committee members have visited the towns of 
Weston, Way land, Sudbury and Concord to learn more of nursing pro- 
grams and problems. As a result, recommendations were presented 
to the Board of Selectmen, the Board of Health and the School Com- 
mittee for consideration and possible adoption at such time as a 
new nurse assumes duties in the town. 

Mrs. Barbara Woods served as town nurse during Mrs. Ober's 
vacation in August. 

The Committee would like to express its gratitude to all volun- 
teers who have assisted and given generously of their time during 
the year. 



79 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



1958 Summary 




Medical 


369 


Surgical 


9 


Pre-Natal 


15 


Post-Natal 


6 


Child-Welfare 


452 


Social-Welfare 


31 


Well-Child Conference and 




Dental Service 


69 


Board of Health 


39 


Trips to hospital or to 




doctor's office 


69 



Total number of calls 1059 



Number of patients died 7 

Number of patients moved away 3 
Number of patients moved to 

hospital or nursing home 4 

Number of new patients 5 

Number of patients December 31 13 



Fees Collected 

Nursing $ 209.00 

Dental 1,636.15 

Well-Child Conference 32.50 

Dog Clinic 89.50 



80 



PUBLIC WELFARE 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

M. Elizabeth Causer, Agent 

The local Board of Public Welfare is responsible for the admin- 
istration of four categories of assistance, namely, Old Age Assistance, 
Aid to Dependent Children, Disability Assistance and General Relief. 

Aid was given to 28 recipients under the Old Age Assistance pro- 
gram in 1958. 

Payments: 

From Town Funds $17,806.85 

From Federal Funds 10.176.81 

$27,983.66 

Receipts: 

Balance from 1957 $ 1,779.49 

Refunds 123.10 

U. S. Government 11,608.05 

Commonwealth of Mass. 13,758.75 

Commonwealth of Mass. 

Meals Tax 515.46 

Other Cities and Towns 497.10 

$28,281.95 
Cost to Town of Lincoln 2.913.86 

$31,195.81 
Balance Reserved for O.A.A. 3.212.15 

$ 27.983.66 

Aid to Dependent Children: No aid given in 1958. 

Balance from 1957 $ 384.88 

Payment to Commonwealth of Mass. 10.00 

Balance Reserved for A. D. C. $ 374.88 

Disability Assistance: No aid given in 1958. 

Balance Reserved for Disability 

Assistance $ 236.92 

General Relief aid given $ 657.50 



81 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



MOSQUITO CONTROL IN LINCOLN 

David L. Garrison, Commissioner 
Robert L. Armstrong, Superintendent 

There was a lot of wet weather in 1958 and more spraying was re- 
quired. There was also more migration of mosquitoes into the terri- 
tory in the westerly part of the town. 

The greater part of the swamplands were dusted with DDT by hand 
or by helicopter during the winter. The remaining swamps, except 
the Sudbury River meadows, were sprayed after larvae hatched in the 
early spring. The results against the spring brood were good except 
in the Beaver Pond swamp areas. 

House mosquito sources were inspected and sprayed with oil from 
June through September. Catch basins were sprayed six times with 
oil. 

The frequent summer rains produced a lot of Culex salinarius in 
swamps during July and August. Limited helicopter spraying was done 
against the adult mosquitoes on June 12th and September 4th. This 
mosquito usually delays biting until well after dark. 

Ditches were reclaimed in late winter south of Rando off Winter 
Street and off Browning Lane. A little more ditching was done in 
the fall at the Edgell property off Conant Road and also north of the 
school area in the center of town. 

Financial Statement: 

Balance on hand December 31, 1957 $3,102.29 

1958 appropriation, received July 18th 6,000.00 

Expenditures: 

Labor $3,643.13 

Workmen's Compensation, claims 233.92 

County retirement 129.20 

Office operation, supervision 516.79 

Office rent 46.16 

Barn rent 138.60 

Vehicle replacement 313.30 

Insecticide 789.12 

Aircraft service 374.00 

Other services 15.00 
Field operation, equip., Supervision 637.88 

$6,837.10 
Balance on December 31, 1958 $2,265.19 

82 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



The East Middlesex Mosquito Control Commission has requested an 
appropriation of $6,000.00 for 1959. 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Andrew J. Dougherty 

The following animals have been inspected: 

Cows and heifers, 2 years and over 118 

Heifers, 1-2 years 44 

Heifers, under 1 year 24 

Number of bulls 4 

Number of steers 6 

Number of horses 48 

Number of goats 3 

Number of sheep 47 

Number of swine 625 

All animals are under the rules and regulations of the Division 
of Livestock Disease Control. 

The Division of Livestock has been given a list of the owners and 
the numbers and kind of the animals in the town. During the past 
year the animals have not been threatened with an epidemic. 

During the year fourteen dog bites were reported. 



83 



Planning and 
Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

Walter Bogner George Kidder 

Paul Brooks Alan McClennen 

Katharine S. White, Chairman 

The Planning Board, in accordance with custom, organized at its 
first meeting following the 1958 Annual Town Meeting, electing 
Katharine S. White, chairman, Walter Bogner, clerk, and appointing 
Alan McClennen to the Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee, Mrs. 
White to the Selectmen's Steering Committee and George Kidder as the 
Planning Board's representative to Board of Appeals hearings. Paul 
Brooks was welcomed as the Board's new member, and a resolution was 
sent to the Board's retiring member, Everett A. Black, expressing its 
appreciation of his five years of service. 

It has been a busy year. Always two, often three, meetings 
were held per month, with the exception of July and August when the 
Board met only on its regular meeting day, the second Wednesday of 
the month. Four public hearings were held on subdivisions, plus 
other conferences with the Selectmen, Board of Appeals, Massachusetts 
Department of Public Works and the Boston National Historic Sites 
Commission. 

For the first time, the Board has a paid secretary, Mrs. 
Elizabeth J. Snelling, and she has already become indispensable. With 
her help, work has begun on a filing system for maps and correspondence 
that should be complete in 1959. 

I. SUBDIVISION CONTROL 

Under the Subdivision Control Law, lots of adequate size and 
frontage on existing public ways may be built upon without Planning 
Board approval; however, plans of such lots may not be recorded at 
the Registry of Deeds without the endorsement, "Approval under Sub- 
Division Control Law Not Required", signed by a majority of the 
Board. Our records show that we executed eighteen such endorsements 
during the year. 

Four subdivisions are currently under preliminary discussion. 
Three subdivisions are conditionally approved: 

Harold B. Demone, off Old Cambridge Turnpike -- 
57 acres into 24 lots 



84 



PLANNING BOARD 

Elizabeth F. Howard, off Concord Road — 

10 acres into 5 lots 
Olga Pertzoff , off Tower Road — 

76 acres into 14 lots 

The Board wishes to emphasize that conditional or even final 
approval of a subdivision after all the requirements relative to con- 
struction of improvements have been met does not imply approval for 
acceptance by the Town of such improvements at a later date. The 
Board will not recommend to the Town acceptance of streets as public 
ways, unless street surfaces and water mains are currently in good 
repair and any drainage inadequacies are rectified to its satisfaction, 

To handle the processing of subdivisions more efficiently, the 
Board created a Subdivision Review Committee, with Alan McClennen as 
chairman and composed of one member each from the Water Board, Board 
of Health and Selectmen. This enables the Town Boards involved in 
subdivision processing to handle mutual problems together. 

The Board feels that its Rules and Regulations governing sub- 
divisions should be more detailed. Work has begun on this revision, 
and the Board hopes to complete it in 1959. 

II. COMMERCIAL AREAS 

The Planning Board's concern with commercial areas is legally 
limited to approving the parking area which must be three times the 
ground floor area of the building or buildings on the proposed lot. 
The Board feels that that part of the zoning by-law which deals with 
the commercial areas is inadequate and at present is working on an 
improved version. 

A. South Lincoln 

There has been a lot of activity in this area this year — an 
addition of 3000 square feet to Joseph Hurd's Community Store, the 
erection of a new and larger commercial building on approximately the 
same site as the old railroad station and various conferences with the 
Lincoln Post of the American Legion on its building in this area. 
Parking designs for both these buildings were approved. 

It is essential that there be an overall plan for the total 
South Lincoln Commercial Area so that the area will be developed in 
an attractive, efficient and economical manner. The Planning Board 
has such a plan, but it needs further work, and has found the three 
ownerships most recently involved cooperative. 

B. Area along Route 2A 

An addition to a building owned by David W. Mann. Inc., necessi- 

85 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

tated additional parking area; this was approved by the Planning 
Board. 

III. LONG-TERM PLANNING 

A. Traffic Count 



The Planning Board, with the help of some public-spirited citi- 
zens, had an Origin and Destination Traffic Count on April 9, 1958, 
between 7:00 and 9:00 A. M. on Lincoln Road near the Center School. 
326 cars passed from south to north in this period, an increase of 71 
cars over a similar count taken in 1955. Local traffic was down 
from 65% in 1955 to 62%; through traffic had risen from 35% to 38%. 
For the first time a north to south count was taken — 221 cars were 
counted, of which 71% were local. 

B. Route 2 Relocation 

The relocation and conversion of the present Route 2 into a 
limited access highway has been a constant concern of the Planning 
Board, as past Town Reports testify. It is one of the most important 
changes facing the Town. There has been no activity by the Massa- 
chusetts Department of Public Works this year, but their past ex- 
pressed interest in relocating it across the end of Sandy Pond would 
do irreparable damage to the Town — it would not only destroy some 
of the most valuable future residential areas of the Town and endanger 
the Town's water supply, but it would separate the northern part of 
Lincoln from the rest of the Town irrevocably. Fortunately, the 
"Planning for Lincoln" report, prepared for the Town by the two con- 
sultants, Morton Braun and Charles Eliot, offers a solution. 

C. National Historic Park 

The Boston National Historic Sites Commission, a Federal commis- 
sion appointed by the U. S. Congress in 1955 to study the feasibility 
of preserving historic Colonial properties in and around Boston, sub- 
mitted its report to the Secretary of the Interior in December. 
Among other things, it recommends that a national historic park of 
712 acres be created embracing portions of the route in Lexington, 
Lincoln and Concord that was traversed by the British on the 19th of 
April, 1775, and used by the Minute Men to turn their withdrawal into 
a rout. Three hundred of these acres are in Lincoln. The consul- 
tants of the "Planning For Lincoln" report recommended that Lincoln 
support the Commission's report with two provisions (see following 
section). After frequent consultation with the Commission and 
Conrad Wirth, director of the National Park Service, the government 
agency that would run this proposed park, the Planning Board felt the 
interests of the landowners involved were protected and with its two 
provisions accepted the consultants' recommendation for the reasons 
appearing in the following section. 

86 



PLANNING BOARD 

D. "Planning for Lincoln" Report 

By far the most important work that the Planning Board faced this 
year was bringing to a successful conclusion the work begun by the two 
consultants, hired by the Planning Board in 1957 after the Town had 
voted $2,000, to be matched by Federal funds. They began their work 
in February, 1958, and finished in December. This required a great 
amount of extra time and work on the part of Planning Board members. 
The Board feels that the citizens of Lincoln have an unusual oppor- 
tunity before them — to guide the future development of the Town 
along the principles outlined by the consultants. The Town is still 
young enough in its potential population growth and land use to make 
decisions now that will lead to an orderly and attractive community 
development resulting in a town that in decades to come will still be 
offering its citizens a kind of living that rampant growth has already 
caused to disappear in many towns and cities in the present metropoli- 
tan region. There is a sense of urgency about utilizing this oppor- 
tunity; it will not exist for long because of the enormous metropolitan 
pressures being exerted on towns, such as Lincoln, on the rim of the 
present urban areas. We hope all citizens will study this report 
carefully, and we reprint below for the record the Planning Board's 
introduction to this report with its recommendations for action and 
with its "Preliminary General Plan" map. 

To the Citizens of Lincoln: 

At the Town Meeting of March 18, 1957, the Planning Board was 
authorized to engage professional services 'toward a comprehensive 
study and presentation of factual data on the current conditions and 
trends in the Town, including the impact of light industrial, com- 
mercial or other zoning changes upon the Town 1 . The Board then se- 
lected two professional planners to carry out the study: Professor 
Charles W. Eliot of Harvard University and Mr. Morton Braun of Plan- 
ning and Renewal Associates. The consultants submitted their report 
and the Planning Board in turn reviewed their findings, in a series of 
special meetings during the summer and fall, at many of which the 
consultants were present. The Board then reached its conclusions. 
The booklet contains the complete text of the professional study, with 
this introductory statement giving the position of the Planning Board 
in regard to the consultants' recommendations. An appendix presents 
a series of graphs and tables that illustrate the 'current conditions 
and trends in the Town'. A map entitled "Town of Lincoln - Prelim- 
inary General Plan" serves as a key illustration to the study and ap- 
pears as a central spread in the booklet. 

The report refers to the 'character and distinctive qualities of 
Lincoln' that are being enjoyed by the citizens and shows how they 
have grown out of nature and the works of man over the past two hun- 
dred and fifty years. With this as background, the planners point to 
the forces of change that are now exerting their impact on the develop- 

87 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



ment of the Town. They recommend measures to safeguard existing 
values and to cope with the usual problems associated with a rapid 
town growth; they also enter into the special difficulties arising 
from the encroachment of Bedford Airport and the proposed relocation 
of Highway 2 on the northern edge of Sandy Pond. They point to the 
unusual opportunities before the Town to protect and develop North 
Lincoln that rest in the proposal of the Boston National Historic 
Sites Commission to establish a National Historic Park in that area. 

The growth of Lincoln has greatly accelerated since the end of 
World War II. The figures presented on page 50 of the report show 
that the Town grew at the rate of 50 houses per year between 1949 and 
1957. Were that rate to continue, the available land for 80,000 
square foot house lots would be consumed in twenty years and a popu- 
lation of 6000 would be reached. Though this will not happen in such 
a short time if large land owners continue to hold on to their proper- 
ties, nevertheless, present day planning for Lincoln must anticipate 
the consequences of a doubling in the size of the population within 
the not too distant future. Rural farm and woodland will be dis- 
appearing in subdivisions; many of the Town's narrow country roads 
will become inadequate for a greatly increasing traffic both from 
our growing population and from the expanding industrial and housing 
developments in the region; and the need for more costly town services 
schools in particular - may cause continuously rising taxes. 

The consultants in their planning study throw light on each of 
these points and outline their conclusions in the 'Summary of Findings 
and Recommendations ' on pages 15-18. The Planning Board explains its 
position in respect to these findings and recommendations under the 
following headings: (1) "The Open Space Program", (2) "The Proposed 
National Historic Park", (3) "The Road Problem", (4) "Considerations 
for Rezoning". The Board then presents a plan for action under each 
heading. 

The 'Preliminary General Plan' consolidates the various proposals 
in a map offering a framework for the orderly growth and development 
of the town. While many of the details may undergo changes without 
impairment to the over-all objectives of the Plan, certain of its 
features are vital to the future of Lincoln as a residential community. 
These are: first, the definition of the limits of the air base and all 
its fringe developments in relation to the town; second, the prevention 
of a physical division of the town by a road of the type proposed for 
the new Highway 2; third, the preservation of open space. 

THE OPEN SPACE PROGRAM 

During the past twenty-five years, Lincoln has become a part of 
the metropolitan community. By far the major portion of our popula- 
tion are now commuters. But despite this change, we have managed so 
far to preserve the essentially rural character of the town. Much of 

88 



PLANNING BOARD 

the land is still being farmed. Owing to large individual holdings, 
much of it is still in fields and woods. We have not yet lost the 
spaciousness, the beauty of landscape, the opportunities for outdoor 
recreation and nature study, the many values that are associated with 
country, as opposed to typically suburban, living. 

This is not inconsistent with Lincoln's position in the larger 
community. As the consultants state in this report: "Different parts 
of a metropolitan region should be expected to serve different pur- 
poses, peculiar to the physical conditions, history and potentialities 
of the particular area". The unique character of our town is depen- 
dent on one factor above all others: Open Space. By 'open space' is 
meant land which is under cultivation or left in its natural state, as 
distinguished from land which is developed for residential or other 
purposes. This is what has attracted people to Lincoln as a place to 
live and bring up their children; this is what the citizens of Lincoln ■ 
in advance of most other communities - have sought to preserve. We 
were one of the first towns in Massachusetts to adopt zoning, estab- 
lishing a minimum lot requirement of 10,000 feet in 1929, and of 
40,000 feet in 1936. We were the first in the state to go to overall 
80,000 feet in 1955. Our assessment policies have indicated our 
awareness of the importance to us of our farms and other open land. 
We have established a private Land Trust; and, at the recommendation 
of the Planning Board, the Town voted at the last Town Meeting to set 
up a Conservation Commission (again, the first town in the state to 
do this), as authorized by recent State legislation. 

Financially speaking, open land is not a luxury. On the con- 
trary, the experience of other towns - and our own experience to date - 
indicates that increased building and increased population leads to a 
higher tax rate; in other words, that the additional expense of school 
and other services exceeds the additional income from taxes on new 
residential property. 

Two important considerations in an open space program are water 
conservation and recreation. The growing concern of both the federal 
and state governments with water conservation demands that local gov- 
ernment groups play their part in preserving watersheds and wet lands. 
A second point is that 80,000 square feet zoning does not supply re- 
creational facilities for the community as a whole, such as would be 
provided by a system of connected open spaces and public rights of way. 

In the opinion of the Planning Board, immediate action is 
necessary if we are to preserve our open space, and with it the 
character of our town. As the Public Land Study Committee stated over 
two years ago in its report: 'The future will bring more people, more 
houses and more traffic into town. Less open land will remain for 
the enjoyment of the citizen. That is when public land will be 
needed the most, and that is the time it will be hardest to come by. 

89 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

The present report describes those areas that are considered most 
essential to be preserved as open space. (It should be noted that a 
large proportion is swamp land essential to water conservation, which 
could be acquired at a minimum cost to the Town). While State and 
Metropolitan District Commission projects are included in this survey, 
the Planning Board believes that emphasis should be placed on the pro- 
jects which are the responsibility of the Town; i.e., projects on 
which local action is possible. 

Your Board strongly endorses the consultants' plan for advance 
acquisition and a coordinated effort (by the Planning Board, Lincoln 
Land Conservation Trust and Conservation Commission) toward preserving 
the connected land indicated on the Preliminary General Plan map as 
open space, by means of citizen gifts, voluntary restrictions, ease- 
ments, covenants, direct town acquisition and/or zoning. It recom- 
mends: 

1. That the Town support State action on the Bay Circuit, 
Walden Pond, Cat Rock and Cambridge Reservoir projects 
when the occasion arises. 

2. That the Conservation Commission 

a. Negotiate, in coordination with the Lincoln 
Land Conservation Trust, with private owners 
for preservation of natural landscape as open 
areas along some such lines as indicated by 
proposed areas on the map, plus areas around 
the town center. The Planning Board, however, 
definitely rejects any suggestions that these 
open areas be used at any future time for road 
purposes. 

b. Make, prior to the 1960 Annual Town Meeting, a 
specific recommendation on acquisition of land 
for a town forest and/or recreation area. 

3. That a stabilization fund be established to be used on 
a long range basis for strategic land acquisition, and 
that an article be placed in the warrant for- the 1959 
Annual Town Meeting to appropriate $7000 as an initial 
appropriation for this purpose. 

4. That the Planning Board 

a. Negotiate with subdividers for the preservation 
of recreational areas, setbacks from stream and 
swamp land whenever possible. 

b. Place the following article in the warrant for 
the 1959 annual Town Meeting: 

To see if the Town will authorize the Planning 
Board to obtain options for land or rights 
therein that it desires to recommend be ac- 
quired by the Town as locations for future 
streets, for playgrounds and recreational 
purposes, or for any other proper municipal 

90 



PLANNING BOARD 

purpose; appropriate a sum of money therefor, 
or take any other action relative thereto, 
c. Bring to the 1960 Annual Town Meeting recommenda- 
tions concerning zoning for preservation of swamp 
land, streams, open space; and/or flood plain and 
agricultural zoning. 
5. That the Selectmen appoint an advisory committee to replace 
the present Roadside Beautif ication Committee to be called 
the Town Landscape Committee, to be composed of the Tree 
Warden, 2 members from the Garden Club, and 2 members at 
large - this committee's responsibility to be the preserva- 
tion, maintenance and extension of roadside planting, re- 
placement of public trees, landscaping and exterior decora- 
tion of public buildings. 

THE PROPOSED NATIONAL HISTORIC PARK 

The Historic Features section of the consultants' report is 
divided into three parts: (1) Proposed Minute Man National Historic 
Park, (2) Old Houses and Their Settings, (3) Names of Places and Roads, 
By far the most important is the proposed National Park, which would 
become an integral part of the General Plan for the orderly growth and 
development of Lincoln. 

In 1955, the 84th Congress, sparked by Senator Saltonstall and 
Congressman McCormack and the other members of the Massachusetts dele- 
gation in Washington, created a commission to study 'the feasibility 
of establishing a coordinated local, State and Federal program in the 
city of Boston, Mass., and general vicinity thereof, for the purpose 
of preserving the historic properties, objects and buildings of the 
Colonial and Revolutionary period of American history'. The Lincoln 
Planning Board and the consultants have been in constant touch with 
this commission and the area indicated on the Preliminary General Plan 
map is the same as the commission is recommending to Congress in 1959. 

The state and federal governments favor the establishment of this 
park from patriotic, educational and economic motives. Already there 
are two national parks dealing respectively with the middle and end of 
the American Revolution (Saratoga and Yorktown) and there is a need 
for a park dealing with the beginning of the Revolution. This partic- 
ular section of the country has been chosen because of the importance 
of the Lexington-Concord Battle Road. 

The consultants further suggest that two provisions be attached 
to the establishment of this Park — that the National Park Service 
arrange for life tenancy, lease-back, assistance in moving residences, 



Copies of this commission's report available at Town Hall 
and Library. 

91 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

and similar provision to minimize the disruption of residential and 
business uses and hardship to owners and occupants, and that the Act 
establishing the Historic Park will make provision for payment of 
taxes or payments in lieu of taxes on all properties included in the 
park which are used for a private purpose or require services from the 
Town of Lincoln. 

State and federal policies are often in opposition to local de- 
sires; but in this case the Town of Lincoln stands to benefit consider- 
ably by the establishment of the Park for the following reasons: 

1. It would provide a stabilization zone between Bedford Air 
Base and the Town of Lincoln, with consequent support of 
real estate values south of the Park. 

2. It would offer further justification for relocating Highway 
2 on the edge of the Town, since this location would make 
the proposed park more accessible and would eliminate the 
necessity for a separate by-pass road. 

3. It would provide a buffer zone between the town and any 
future light industrial zone with consequent protection of 
real estate values south of the Park. 

For these reasons the Planning Board strongly supports the con- 
sultants' recommendation with its two provisions for the establishment 
of the Minute Man National Historic Park. 

The other two parts of the Historic Features section of the re- 
port: 'Old Houses and Their Settings' and 'Names of Places and Roads' 
are of importance in preserving the 'character and distinctive quali- 
ties of Lincoln'. If a town in a large metropolitan area wishes to 
save itself from 'sprawling urbanitis', it should identify and pre- 
serve the old houses that give it individuality; houses that are con- 
cerned with historic events, famous men, or the town's own development. 
The same thing is true of the names of places and roads. In any 
community which attracts as many new residents as Lincoln, names can 
provide continuity and a distinctive quality in the life of the Town. 
An inventory should be made of names that reflect the history of the 
town and the importance of old families and original settlers, so that 
as new buildings go up, new subdivisions are developed, and open 
spaces set aside, an opportunity will be presented to revive the memory 
of these people or places, as has been done in the case of the Hartwell 
School. 

For these reasons, by the following action, the Planning Board 
supports the consultants' recommendation that the historical aspects 
of the town should be preserved: 

Appointment of a committee by the Selectmen, headed by 
Town Historian, to study further this section of the 



92 



PLANNING BOARD 

report and recommendations II E 3 through 6 on p. 17 and 
II A 2 on p. 16 (the formation of an historical society 
and inventory of and means of preserving historic houses, 
places and names), and report to the 1961 Town Meeting. 

THE ROAD PROBLEM 

The population growth in and around Lincoln is certain to in- 
crease traffic volume on local roads far beyond present conditions. 
The basic road pattern originally evolved for local services now must 
carry traffic to and from substantial employment centers outside the 
town. We now face the necessity for immediate decision if we are to 
preserve the present pattern of tree-lined country roads and field- 
stone walls that give the town its character and enhance its real 
estate values. 

Detailed surveys giving traffic counts and projections to deter- 
mine pavement widths, timing of road construction and estimation of 
costs are not within the scope of this report; but rather it presents 
definite policies which, if adopted, would evolve into an overall plan 
to serve as a guide and check whenever subdivisions are proposed or 
road improvements undertaken. 

The consultants point out that the major volume of through traffic 
should be carried by a few more-than-adequate main routes; in Lincoln 
these are 2, 2A, 117, 126. These roads should be brought up to the 
standards necessary to carry this traffic. 

They also discuss the need for reducing through traffic on local 
roads by the construction of by-pass roads (they suggest various possi- 
bilities). They point out that the building of connections between 
the streets radiating from the 5-point Center intersection (the rim 
concept) through subdivision planning would relieve traffic congestion 
at this point and give better local circulation. They also suggest 
a new method of preserving the town's existing roads by the construc- 
tion of a parallel travelled way on the other side of the tree and 
stone wall lines, for divided traffic. Parts of 126 and 117 might be 
doubletracked, as well as Lincoln, Bedford, Lexington and Trapelo Roads 

The Planning Board realizes that some of these policies are ex- 
pensive and require substantial time for development. But we shall 
be forced to change some of our roads if reasonable standards of safety 
and convenience are to be maintained. 

Last and most important, they recommend a relocation of Highway 2, 
adjacent to the proposed Historic Park. Of primary concern to Lincoln 
residents is the Department of Public Works' present proposal to place 
a new limited-access highway, 300-350 feet in width, south of the 
present Highway 2 along the northern shore of Sandy Pond. This would 
not only destroy some of the most valuable future residential areas of 

93 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



the town and endanger the town's watershed but would sever North Lin- 
coln from the rest of the Town and lower the quality of the existing 
residential development in that section. The consultants point out 
that the alternative choice of relocation just south of the proposed 
Historic Park is based not only on the selfish interests of Lincoln 
but offers advantages to the State: it makes the airbase more access- 
ible and lowers the State's cost of road building, in that it eliminates 
the expense of building a separate by-pass road south of the Proposed 
Historic Park. 

The Planning Board recommends the following action: 

1. Adoption and vigorous advocacy by the Town Boards and towns- 
people of the relocation of Highway 2 along the southern 
boundary of the Proposed Historic Park. 

2. Preparation and adoption by the Selectmen with the help 
of the Planning Board of a long range road plan to be 
printed and sent to the town by the 1960 annual town meet- 
ing and based on 

a. The classification of roads in Appendix I of the 
1956 Report of the Long-Term Capital Requirements 
Committee. 

b. Detailed traffic surveys to determine pavement 
widths and jurisdiction of road classes. 

c. The consideration of double-tracking wherever 
feasible (e.g. South Lincoln commercial area). 

d. The bringing of the numbered routes up to stan- 
dards necessary to carry through traffic. 

e. Acceptance of the concept and further study of a 
by-pass road to eliminate the inevitable danger 
and congestion at the 5-point Center intersection 
and on Lincoln Road (the Town's most important 
road - on it are located the Town's schools, two 
of its three churches, library, town offices and 
shopping centers). 

f . Acceptance of the rim concept in subdivision plan- 
ning. The Planning Board has and will continue 
to provide extension for road linkage between sub- 
divisions. 

g. Adoption of policy of replacement of trees and 
stone walls whenever widening of roads seems the 
only answer, and exploration of possibility that 
abuttors might give land in exchange for such re- 
placement. 

h. Traffic study to determine if Old County Road would 
draw off through traffic from local town roads, and, 
if so, construction, with the help of Chapter 90, 
of a relocated Old County Road from North Avenue 
in Weston to Winter Street and an improved Old 
County Road as far as Trapelo Road. 

94 



PLANNING BOARD 



CONSIDERATIONS FOR REZONING 



One of the main purposes for which the consultants were employed 
was to make a study of 'the impact of light industrial, commercial or 
other zoning changes on the Town'. Though Lincoln has always been 
an agricultural and residential community, in the last few years the 
thought has arisen that the Town should consider rezoning for industry. 
The reasons for this are: first, that with a rising tax rate the town*s 
income from an industry might help to reduce the levy on home owners; 
second, that near the research station at the Bedford Airbase is a 
good location for related industries, particularly as this is also 
close to Highway 128 where a great number of industries have moved; 
three, that such location of industry would eliminate the loss of this 
land to the Air Force. 

The findings and recommendations on this aspect of the consultants 
study may be summarized as follows: 

The most appropriate categories of nonresidential development for 
the town of Lincoln are light production and research, with the addi- 
tion of commercial enterprises in the Mill Street area. Many factors 
from both the Town's and the prospective nonresidential developers' 
view points militate against heavy industry in Lincoln. 

Only two possible areas within the Town, totaling approximately 
150 acres, are considered suitable for light industrial or commercial 
development. 

1. The first area, comprising about 85 acres, is located on 
the Bedford Levels at the end of the southwest runway of 
the Air Base. This area is already isolated and unsuit- 
able for residences because of the flight easement appurt- 
enant to the southwest runway of the Air Base. It adjoins 
an area in the Town of Concord which it is believed the 
Concord Planning Board is now considering for light in- 
dustry. If Highway 2 should be relocated along the route 
which the consultants recommend and if the Historic Park 
becomes a reality, a barrier will result between those 
sections of Lincoln lying between the Bedford Air Base and 
the Historic Park and the remainder of the Town. A new 
approach road would have to be built to service this area. 

2. The second area, comprising about 65 acres, is located 
west of Mill Street and south of Route 2A. This area is 
suggested as the one that would most logically lend itself 
to development as a limited commercial adjunct to the pro- 
posed Historic Park. If the Park is established, this 
area in the consultants' words 'would have a special at- 
traction for commercial uses serving the Park - restaurants, 
motels, automotive needs, gift shops - as an area in which 
displaced commercial facilities may be relocated.' The 

95 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

consultant primarily responsible for this section of the 
report sees a potential for light industrial development 
of this area even without the establishment of the Park. 
He believes that, with proper zoning controls, its non- 
residential development would not affect existing resi- 
dential development to the east and south. However, the 
Planning Board feels that such a suggestion should be ap- 
proached with the greatest caution, since the proposed 
Park, and Highway 2 in its recommended new location south 
of the Park, would be the chief barriers to protect resi- 
dential properties in North Lincoln. 

The consultants further state that each of these areas is large 
enough to be self-contained and to offer opportunities for several 
enterprises. 

They believe that rezoning, for non-residential development, if 
properly circumscribed by controls, can be accomplished without im- 
pairment of the essentially residential character of the remainder of 
the Town. These controls are: 'No change of zoning to 'industrial' 
is suggested without the prior application of a particular enterprise. 
This is because no general zoning change, however carefully worded, 
can be relied upon to give the protection desired. Also experience 
in other communities has demonstrated the necessity, prior to re- 
zoning, of advance formulation of high performance standards and proper 
zoning controls and of agreement by the proposed developer to absolute 
compliance with those controls and standards. However, the Board feels 
that the consultants' report should have contained more facts concern- 
ing the potential effect that industrial zones have on surrounding 
residential areas and on the values of the town in general. 

The consultants further feel that detailed site studies of both 
areas by the Planning Board must be undertaken to determine the cost 
to the Town of additional capital outlays necessary to provide the 
requisite municipal services such as roads, water and fire and police 
protection, before it can be accurately known what net tax revenue the 
Town can expect to realize from each of the areas mentioned. The 
nature of the services required are, of course, dependent upon the 
type of nonresidential development involved. 

The consultants believe that the possible gross tax revenue from 
a light industrial development on the Bedford Levels site can be esti- 
mated only in a general manner. Under admittedly ideal conditions, 
with a 10% design factor for streets and with construction limited to 
20% coverage to permit ample space for parking and aesthetic appear- 
ance, there would be potentially 650,000 square feet of available floor 
space with a construction value of about $6,500,000, not including "land. 
If this were assessed at 50% of its construction value, the net in- 
crease in the tax base of the Town would be appreciable. The present 
limitations of water supply would not be aggravated by development on 

96 



PLANNING BOARD 



this site since no industry requiring water for processing would locate 
here, and domestic use would approximate that of residential develop- 
ment. However, the Board takes a conservative attitude toward this 
estimate, realizing that capital outlays would be involved which would 
reduce the net gain. 

The consultants further point out that the experience of other 
towns, such as Needham, indicates that while non-residential revenues 
can contribute to and temporarily stabilize a town's tax base, this 
may not prevent tax increases in the long run. 

The annual increase in total assessed valuation of real estate 
in the Town has averaged about $400,000 per year over the past decade. 
So long as this rate of growth continues, the Town can absorb annual 
increases in operating expenses of about $30,000 at a stable tax rate 
of approximately $75.00. Until 1957 a projection of a continued rate 
of growth at this level could have been made with some degree of 
assurance. However, the reduced amount of new residential construc- 
tion in 1957 and 1958, as evidenced by lower building permit values, 
makes it extremely doubtful that the Town can count upon the assessed 
valuation increasing at this rate. It may be still too early to draw 
conclusions in this regard, since a number of causes can be offered to 
explain the reduced level of building. 80,000 sq. ft. zoning is, of 
course, a factor, but other reasons such as unavailability of land and 
lower economic activity on a national level may also be important. 

Without the benefit of revenue from nonresidential sources or 
increased state contribution, the consultants foresee a continual rise 
in the Town's tax rate in the predictable future. This rise is an 
inevitable result of growth and the consequent need primarily for new 
capital facilities for education and secondarily for other town ser- 
vices. But it should also be noted that a reduced level of new build- 
ing may reduce expenses for school and other services. 

The Planning Board has reviewed these findings and has come to 
the following conclusions: 

1. The two areas recommended are the only suitable ones for 
light industrial or commercial development. 

2. The matter of timing in rezoning, as the consultants sug- 
gest, is most important. The Planning Board is fearful that a pre- 
mature establishment of nonresidential zones in the locations proposed 
might endanger the accomplishment of the Preliminary General Plan 
presented by the consultants. The Planning Board has unanimously 
agreed to a policy that no action should be taken by the town to re- 
zone areas that might in any way jeopardize the establishment of the 
National Historic Park and the relocation of Highway 2 beside the 
park, for the Board feels that the Historic Park alone or much better 



97 




TOWN OF LINCOLN, MA55. 
PRELIMINARY GENERAL PLAN 

TOWN PLANNING BOARD OF LINCOLN 



MORTON B.BRAUN PLANNING 

CHARLES W. ELIOT CONSULTANTS 



1111 EXISTING PARK5 & RESERVATIONS fe^g] SWAMPS 

H EXISTING SCHOOL, INSTITUTIONS & OTHER TAX EXEMPT AREAS 



PROPOSED "SWAMP BELT* RESERVATION OTHER PROPOSED RESERVATIONS 



PROPOSED NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 



PROPOSED BAY CIRCUIT 



SSSSS PROPOSED ROUTE Z POSSIBLE ROAD IMPROVEMENTS 




PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



the Park and the suggested Highway 2 are the last chance the Town will 
have to prevent the spread of undesirable developments from the Bed- 
ford Airbase with the resulting deterioration of real estate values 
between the Airbase and Highway 2. 

3. The Town should not be asked to act upon a proposal for re- 
zoning these areas until it can be assured that the zoning controls 
and performance standards will be adequate and that the prospective 
developer unqualifiedly can meet the standards of those controls and 
standards/' 



98 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Thomas B. Adams Hans Van Leer 

Henry B. Hoover Charles Y. Wadsworth 

William N. Swift 

Hearings were held on eighteen petitions to the Board during the 
year 1958. Set forth below is a summary of the decisions: 

Petition filed by Frank Pino to alter a building on a non- 
conforming lot on Concord Turnpike. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Maurice Leslie to allow rental of building off 
Concord Turnpike. Petition denied. 

Petition filed by Winifred Sullivan for a variance to allow con- 
struction of a single family dwelling on a lot on Winter Street having 
less than required frontage. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Hildur Sorenson for variance to use her 
property on Route #2 for business purposes. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Ruth Barbarow for variance to add to a non- 
conforming dwelling on Old Sudbury Road. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Ferdinand Troisi for variance to add to a non- 
conforming dwelling on Old Sudbury Road. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Margaret and Paul Marsh for permission to use 
barn on Winter Street for a Nursery School. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Thomas Diamond, Administrator, for permission 
to alter non-conforming dwelling on Cambridge Turnpike. Petition 
granted. 

Petition filed by McKnight's Nursery and Landscape Service on 
South Great Road for permission to sell grass seed, fertilizer, peat 
moss and insecticides. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Thomas W. Coan for permission to sell a strip 
of land from his property on Lincoln Road thus making his remaining 
lot non-conforming. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Arthur Witham for approval of non-conforming 
division of building lots on Beaver Pond Road. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Jacqueline M. Ferro to remodel non-conforming 
dwelling on Lincoln Road. Petition granted. 



99 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



Petition filed by Norman W. Hoar for variance to allow continu- 
ance of temporary kitchen in home on Lincoln Road. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by R. Langdon and Ruth W. Wales for a variance to 
permit construction of a single-family dwelling twenty-eight feet 
eight inches from the side lot line instead of the required thirty 
feet on Lot 5, Brown's Wood, Moccasin Hill. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Richard Halloran of Newton, Massachusetts, for 

a permit to conduct a landscape nursery business on the property of 

Peter Helburn located on the south side of North Great Road in Lincoln, 
Petition denied. 

Petition filed by Robert M. Malloy for a variance to permit the 
erection of a commercial building, with a 40-foot setback, on Lincoln 
Road. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by Robert M. Malloy for a variance, if necessary, 
and for a permit in any event, to remove fill from residentially 
zoned property adjacent to the commercial property on Lincoln Road to 
provide for a septic tank field to service the proposed commercial 
building. Petition granted. 

Petition filed by The First Parish in Lincoln for a variance to 
allow construction of a residence on a legally constituted lot owned 
by the First Parish off Bedford Road not having the required amount of 
frontage on a public way. Petition granted. 



BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 

Walter Belanger Robert Bygrave 

William Halsey Stephen Herthel 

Donald Loveys Lawrence Anderson, Chairman 

The Building Code Board of Appeals was organized for the year 
1958 with Mr. Lawrence Anderson as Chairman, and Mr. William Halsey 
and Mr. Stephen Herthel as the other regular members of the Board. 
Mr. Belanger, Mr. Bygrave and Mr. Loveys serve as associate members. 

Three cases were heard by the Board, in 1958, as follows: 

Petition of the Massachusetts Audubon Society for a variance 
under the building code to allow for omission of J£ inch bolts, 8 feet 
on center. The petition was denied. 

Petition of Benjamin Drisko for a variance under the building 
code to allow substitution of wallboard for metal lath and plaster in 



100 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



his garage. The petition was granted. 

Petition of Marc Comjean for a variance under the building code 
to allow the omission of wire lath and plaster from the inside ceil- 
ing of his garage. The petition was granted. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Raymond F. Maher, Superintendent 

The Town with its accelerating growth demands more and more of 
its Highway Department in the way of additional and better roads. 
The traffic load through the Town by commuters has reached the point 
where the Town must take a new look at its highways with respect to 
the safety of pedestrian children, school buses, and motorists. 
School bus drivers frequently report dangers at "squeeze points" 
along their routes. Wherever school buses travel, the Town should 
supply a road width not less than twenty-four feet including pavement 
and shoulders. This would allow room off the pavement in case of 
emergency and for snow removal. 

During 1958 many of the more critical spots of the Town's road 
network were resurfaced. There were a number of subdivisions that 
required only a seal to put them back in excellent condition. A 
number of culverts were reset in order to relieve standing water on 
abuttor's property. In addition there was the regular seasonal 
work of snow removal, sweeping the streets and cleaning catch basins 
after the winter months, cutting roadside brush, post and cable con- 
struction, and correlated work with the Tree and Cemetery Departments 



101 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

INSPECTORS OF BUILDING, PLUMBING AND WIRING 

William M. Dean, Building and Wiring Inspector 
Daniel J. Murphy, Plumbing Inspector 

Building permits issued during 1958: 

New residential buildings 18 

New non-residential buildings 7 

Alterations and additions 42 

Buildings demolished 5 

Permits renewed 4 

Buildings moved 1 

Fees collected $1,009.00 

Plumbing permits issued during 1958: 48 

Fees collected $ 790.00 

Wiring permits issued during 1958: 84 

Fees collected $ 459.00 



102 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Russell P. Mahan 
Edward S. Taylor 
Sumner Smith, Chairman 

The Board organized with the choice of Russell P. Mahan, Secre- 
tary, Edward S. Taylor, representative on the Executive Steering Com- 
mittee, and Sumner Smith, Chairman. Eighteen meetings were held 
during the year. 

On April 14 the Board visited the Concord gate houses and Main 
Station, with the Superintendent of the Concord Water Works. The 
meters and remote control of the pumps were observed and investigated, 
and it was considered best to continue checking the level of the 
Lincoln Reservoir in person. The method of measuring the Pond level 
was also observed. 

During April and May the Board was working on plans and specifi- 
cations to carry out the vote passed under Article 20 at the last 
Annual Town Meeting. This is the first time the Board has per- 
formed its own engineering without outside professional aid and super- 
vision, and conservatively saved over $7000. 

Greenough Brothers, whose bid of $36,575 was the lowest of nine 
contractors interested, was awarded the contract. The Water Works 
borrowed $50,000, which was supplemented by about $25,000 from Water 
Works funds, and bought all the pipe, hydrants, gates, valves, etc., 
necessary for the installation. 

The road surface on Old Sudbury Road and South Great Road will 
be repaired in the spring. 

The section on Concord Road (Route 126) was not renewed because 
winter was too close to start that work, but it will be started in 
the spring. 

New copper screens with cypress frames were installed in the 
pond gate